Ella, Emma…Enna?

enna, ella, emmaThe likeable names Emma and Ella are both very popular choices for babies right now. Nationally, Emma is ranked 1st and Ella is 16th.

Both can be traced back to Germanic words: Emma to ermen, meaning “entire, whole,” and Ella to ali, meaning “other, foreign.”

Both can also be used as short forms other names, particularly those starting with Em- (e.g., Emerson, Emmeline) or El- (e.g., Eleanor, Ellen).

So let’s say you like these names, but…you’d really prefer to use something a little less common. One thing you could try is moving to the next letter of the alphabet: L, M, N.

Enna isn’t what you’d call a traditional name. And it’s never been in the top 1,000 — though it did come close once, way back in 1894.

That said, the letter string “enna” is popular in longer names (like Jenna, Sienna, Mckenna, Kenna, Vienna, Brenna, Glenna, Gwenna, Zenna, etc.), and Enna as a standalone name has seen seen slightly higher usage lately:

  • 2017: 14 baby girls named Enna
  • 2016: 24 baby girls named Enna (peak usage so far)
  • 2015: 22 baby girls named Enna
  • 2014: 19 baby girls named Enna
  • 2013: 15 baby girls named Enna
  • 2012: 7 baby girls named Enna

What are your thoughts on the baby name Enna? Do you like it as an alternative to Ella and Emma?


2 thoughts on “Ella, Emma…Enna?

  1. To be outspoken: I don’t think that naming a baby girl Enna is a good idea. People will mishear and misspell the name all the time as Emma, and correcting them is such a waste of time.

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