How popular is the baby name Abigail in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Abigail and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Abigail.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Abigail

Number of Babies Named Abigail

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Abigail

Name Quotes #62: Alice, Donna, Shachar

Ready for another batch of name-related quotes gathered from all over the place?

Let’s start with Liberian midwife Alice Sumo:

…[S]he was both surprised and delighted when quickly babies were named after her.

“I said ‘oh wow’ because with some of them I didn’t even know that they had named the baby after me! When you go to the market everybody is called Alice of Alex or Ellis. The last time I counted it was 862 Alices but now it has increased to 1,000 plus!

“To me the name Alice is an action name. Alice people are active people, they are caring people, they are loving people. A, the first letter in the alphabet. A for action.”

From Jack Burton’s article about songwriters Harry and Albert Von Tilzer in the April 9, 1949, issue of Billboard magazine:

After a season of tanbark and tinsel, Harry caught on with a traveling repertoire company, playing juvenile roles, singing songs of his own composing, and abandoning the family name of Gumm for a more glamorous and professional moniker. He took his mother’s maiden name of Tilzer and added “Von” for a touch of class. This switch in nomenclature proved to be the keystone of a songwriting dynasty which was destined to make history in Tin Pan Alley with the turn of the century.

The family’s surname was originally Gumbinsky. The phrase “tanbark and tinsel” refers to the circus; Harry was part of a traveling circus for a time as a teenager.

From an article about names in Israel by Abigail Klein Leichman:

I figured [Forest Rain’s] parents must have been hippies or Native Americans. In mainstream American culture, it is unusual to name children after elements of nature. How many people do you know named Rainbow, Lightning, Juniper Bush, Boulder, Valley, Oak, Prairie, Wellspring, or Wave?

In Israel, such names are extremely commonplace. If Forest Rain translated her name to Ya’ara Tal, no Israeli would think it exotic in the least. The words mentioned above translate to the everyday Hebrew names Keshet, Barak, Rotem, Sela, Guy, Alon, Bar, Ma’ayan, and Gal.

Another difference is that many modern Israeli names are unisex. You often cannot tell by name alone if someone is male or female. Tal, Gal, Sharon, Noam (pleasant), Shachar (Dawn), Inbar (amber), Inbal (bell), Neta (sapling), Ori (my light), Hadar (splendor), Amit (friend), and myriad other common names are used for either gender.

From an essay in which birder Nicholas Lund contemplates naming his baby after a bird (found via Emily of Nothing Like a Name):

Eventually Liz asked me to think about why I was pushing for this, and whether a birdy name was in the best interests of our kid. Did he need to carry on my own birding legacy? She was right. My son may very well grow up to love birds—I really hope he does—but he also might not. It should be his choice and not mine. If my dad had named me after some of his hobbies, you’d be calling me Carl Yastrzemski Lund or Rapala Lure Lund, and then I’d have to live with that.

From Nelson Mandela’s 1994 autobiography Long Walk to Freedom:

Apart from life, a strong constitution, and an abiding connection to the Thembu royal house, the only thing my father bestowed upon me at birth was a name, Rolihlahla. In Xhosa, Rolihlahla literally means “pulling the branch of a tree”, but its colloquial meaning more accurately would be “troublemaker.” I do not believe that names are destiny or that my father somehow divined my future, but in later years, friends and relatives would ascribe to my birth name the many storms I have both caused and weathered.

From an Irish newspaper article about the CSO disregarding fadas in Irish baby names:

The CSO recently unveiled its Baby Names of Ireland visualisation tool recently published by the Central Statistics Office (CSO) tool allowing users to check the popularity of names officially registered in Ireland. However, it does not allow for names with the síneadh fada or other diacritical marks that denote pronunciation or meaning.

[…]

“Our language, while having a special status afforded it in the Constitution has been progressively marginalised to the fringes of bureaucracy.

“It behoves the Central Statistics Office above all other institutions to be correct in all matters it reports. This is where historians will first go to research,” [author Rossa Ó Snodaigh] said.

From an essay by Donna Vickroy about the difficulty of being named Donna in 2018:

[L]ately people ask “Vonna”? or “Dana?” or “What?” Maybe the whole language movement has taken a toll.

Still, with its solid D beginning, short O solidified by double Ns and that ubiquitous feminine A at the end, Donna is — and should continue to be — easy to understand, pronounce, spell.

And yet, the struggle is real. Donna appears to be aging out.

From an Atlas Obscura article about a disgruntled former 7-Eleven owner:

The owner, Abu Musa, named his new convenience store “6-Twelve,” a one-up of the 7-Eleven name, which references the chain’s original operating hours of 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. Musa’s store operates from 6 a.m. to 12 a.m.

For lots more name quotes, click that link.

Popular Baby Names in Smaller U.S. Territories, 2017

According to the SSA, the most popular baby names in the U.S. territories of Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, the Northern Mariana Islands, and American Samoa — all four regions combined — in 2017 were were Amy and Olivia (tied) and Kevin.

Here are the top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names for the four regions:

Girl Names
1. Amy, 12 baby girls (2-way tie)
2. Olivia, 12 (2-way tie)
3. Sophia, 11
4. Ava, 10 (2-way tie)
5. Emma, 10 (2-way tie)
6. Anna, 9
7. Abigail, 8 (3-way tie)
8. Emily, 8 (3-way tie)
9. Mia, 8 (3-way tie)
10. Annie, 7 (…tied with Charlotte, Isabella, Jasmine, and Sarah)

Boy Names
1. Kevin, 20 baby boys
2. Ethan, 19
3. Daniel, 18 (2-way tie)
4. William, 18 (2-way tie)
5. Michael, 15
6. Lucas, 14
7. Andy, 11 (4-way tie)
8. Joshua, 11 (4-way tie)
9. Liam, 11 (4-way tie)
10. Logan, 11 (4-way tie)

In 2016, the top names were Olivia and Daniel.

Could Kevin’s rise to the #1 spot be due to all the Kevins on U.S. network TV lately?

Here are the top names in Puerto Rico, the largest U.S. territory by both area and population.

Source: Popular Baby Names by Territory (SSA)

Top Lengths of U.S. Baby Names, 2017

Once again, the most popular length for U.S. baby names was six letters.

Here’s a the length breakdown for girl names in 2017:

girl names, lengths, 2017

And here are the most-used girl names per length:

Here’s the breakdown for boy names:

boy names, lengths, 2017

And here are the most-used boy names per length for 2017:

Finally, here are both genders on the same chart:

baby names, lengths, 2017

The results in 2016 were very similar.

Biggest Changes, Baby Girl Names, 2017

Which girl names increased the most in popularity from 2016 to 2017? And which ones decreased the most?

There are a few different ways to answer this question. The SSA, for instance, likes to look at ranking differences within the top 1,000. And I like to augment their list by looking at raw number differences across all the data.

So let’s look at increases first…

Girl Names: Biggest Increases, 2016 to 2017

Rankings

1. Ensley, +1,461 spots
2. Oaklynn, +1,072
3. Dream, +840
4. Oaklyn, +749
5. Melania, +720
6. Emberly, +616
7. Octavia, +435
8. Paisleigh, +364
9. Yara, +352
10. Kehlani, +347

Melania was influenced by the First Lady. Dream was influenced by the latest Kardashian baby.

Raw Numbers

1. Luna, +1,657 babies
2. Mila, +1,123
3. Amelia, +1,047
4. Bella, +957
5. Nova, +748
6. Camila, +704
7. Elena, +685
8. Kinsley, +669
9. Everly, +616
10. Aurora, +590

Camila might have been influenced by Camila Cabello (“Havana ooh na-na…”).

Other names that saw raw number increases in the 300+ range included Raelynn, Willow, Amara, Isla, Samara, and Leilani.

And now let’s check out decreases…

Girl Names: Biggest Decreases, 2016 to 2017

Rankings

1. Julianne, -263 spots
2. Wendy, -243
3. Milania, -241
4. Montserrat, -225
5. Nathaly, -225
6. Jayden, -204
7. Jessa, -201
8. Tenley, -198
9. Aryana, -184
10. Ciara, -183

Looks like Melania stole a lot of attention away from Milania in 2017.

Raw Numbers

1. Sophia, -1,281 babies
2. Emily, -1,211
3. Abigail, -1,196
4. Madison, -1,167
5. Sofia, -1,027
6. Mia, -978
7. Alexa, -883
8. Riley, -788
9. Brooklyn, -774
10. Lily, -769

Alexa was no doubt adversely affected by the prevalence of Amazon’s virtual assistant, Alexa.

Other names that saw raw number drops in the (negative) 300+ range included Kylie, Natalie, Taylor, Morgan, Piper, Trinity, and Harper.

Do you have any explanations for the name movement above? If so, please comment!

Sources: Change in Popularity, SSA, Emma and Liam Top Social Security’s Most Popular Baby Names for 2017

Popular Baby Names in the United States, 2017

According to the Social Security Administration, Emma and Liam were the most popular baby names in the United States in 2017.

Here are the top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names:

Girl Names
1. Emma, 19,738 baby girls (same rank in 2016)
2. Olivia, 18,632 (same)
3. Ava, 15,902 (same)
4. Isabella, 15,100 (was 5th)
5. Sophia, 14,831 (was 4th)
6. Mia, 13,437 (same)
7. Charlotte, 12,893 (same)
8. Amelia, 11,800 (new)
9. Evelyn, 10,675 (new)
10. Abigail, 10,551 (was 8th)

Boy Names
1. Liam, 18,728 baby boys (was ranked 2nd in 2016)
2. Noah, 18,326 (was 1st)
3. William, 14,904 (same)
4. James, 14,232 (was 5th)
5. Logan, 13,974 (new)
6. Benjamin, 13,733 (same)
7. Mason, 13,502 (was 4th)
8. Elijah, 13,268 (was 9th)
9. Oliver, 13,141 (new)
10. Jacob, 13,106 (was 7th)

In the girls’ top ten, Amelia and Evelyn replace Harper (now 11th) and Emily (12th).

In the boys’ top ten, Logan and Oliver replace Michael (now 12th) and Ethan (14th).

In 2016, the top names were Emma and Noah.

Here’s more from the SSA’s press release:

Ensley was the fastest riser on the girls’ list, moving 1,461 spots to number 965, from number 2,426 in 2016. Spring has sprung, and Wells (meaning “spring”) had the biggest bloom in popularity for the boys, moving over 500 spots in 2017 from number 1,419 to 915. Perhaps his parents are fans of the hit TV show “The Bachelorette” where one of the popular contestants was named Wells. Does this mean more bachelors named Wells at future rose ceremonies?

In a clear nod to the popularity of the First Lady of the United States, new parents chose the name Melania at an increasing rate in 2017.

It looks like new parents are “Keeping up with the Kardashians” as the name Dream rose 840 spots in 2017. Fan or not, many people know Rob Kardashian and Angela White, aka Blac Chyna, named their daughter Dream in late 2016. For the boys, another fast riser was Nova, who may have gotten his popularity from all those Villanova Wildcats basketball fans naming their sons in celebration of the 2016 NCAA Men’s Basketball Champions.

More posts on the new names coming soon!

Source: Emma and Liam Top Social Security’s Most Popular Baby Names for 2017