How popular is the baby name Adam in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Adam and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Adam.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Adam

Number of Babies Named Adam

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Adam

Five Name Friday: Boy Name like Ethan, Derek

five name friday, boy name

It’s a post-Thanksgiving Five-Name Friday! Here is today’s baby name request:

I’m looking for medium-length boy names that aren’t easily made into nicknames. Examples of what I mean are Adam, Aaron, Ethan, Owen, Eric, Derek.

Can you come up with five solid baby name suggestions for this person?

Here are the rules:

  • Be independent. Choose your five names before looking at anyone else’s five names.
  • Be sincere. Stick to legit recommendations you would offer a real-life friend or acquaintance.
  • Five names total in your comment. If you go over, I will delete the extras.

Which five baby names are you going to suggest?

[You can also send me your own 2-sentence baby name request using the contact form. Here are all the previous Five-Name Friday posts.]

Baby Names from Bewitched

bewitched, baby names, 1960s

Bewitched, the sitcom about a witch who marries a mere mortal, premiered on ABC in September of 1964 and ran all the way until 1972. Like many popular TV shows, it had a noticeable influence on U.S. baby names. For instance…

Samantha

The name Samantha, which had ranked far outside the top 1,000 for most of the 20th century, skyrocketed in popularity in the mid-1960s thanks to main character (and witch!) Samantha Stephens, played by Elizabeth Montgomery.

  • 1968: 2,339 baby girls named Samantha [rank: 136th]
  • 1967: 1,806 baby girls named Samantha [rank: 176th]
  • 1966: 1,794 baby girls named Samantha [rank: 182nd]
  • 1965: 1,963 baby girls named Samantha [rank: 179th]
  • 1964: 421 baby girls named Samantha [rank: 473rd]
  • 1963: 73 baby girls named Samantha

The name reached and maintained top-5 status during most of the 1990s (with a lot of help from another fictional Samantha: Samantha Micelli from ’80s sitcom Who’s the Boss?).

Montgomery also played the part of Samantha’s cousin Serena, who was a recurring character during later seasons of the show. The name Serena saw higher usage in the late ’60s and early ’70s as a result.

Darrin

The name Darrin was boosted up to its highest-ever usage in 1965 thanks to Samantha’s husband Darrin Stephens, originally played by Dick York.

  • 1968: 2,078 baby boys named Darrin [rank: 138th]
  • 1967: 2,029 baby boys named Darrin [rank: 141st]
  • 1966: 2,568 baby boys named Darrin [rank: 119th]
  • 1965: 3,257 baby boys named Darrin [rank: 102nd] <- peak usage
  • 1964: 801 baby boys named Darrin [rank: 272nd]
  • 1963: 310 baby boys named Darrin [rank: 450th]

In fact, all the spelling variants of Darrin saw peak usage in 1965. The most common spelling of the name, Darren, reached 52nd place in the rankings that year. Also in the top 1,000 were Darin (123th), Daren (271st), Darron (408th), Daron (494th) Daryn (717th), and Darryn (818th).

Endora

The rare name Endora debuted in 1965, thanks to Samantha’s flamboyant and moderately villainous witch-mother Endora, played by Agnes Moorehead (who, several years earlier, played another TV witch).

  • 1968: 7 baby girls named Endora
  • 1967: 17 baby girls named Endora
  • 1966: 19 baby girls named Endora
  • 1965: 28 baby girls named Endora [debut]
  • 1964: unlisted
  • 1963: unlisted

Endora was so dismissive of Darrin that she nearly never bothered to say his name correctly, calling him things like Derwood, Dagwood, Darwick, Dumpkin, and so forth.

Endora’s own name was inspired by the biblical Witch of Endor; “Endor” was an ancient Canaanite city.

Tabatha & Tabitha

The names Tabatha and Tabitha were both featured on Bewitched, confusingly.

Samantha and Darrin’s first child was a baby girl born in January of 1966. They named her Tabitha, a name first strongly suggested in the storyline by Endora (“Whatever you call her, I shall call her Tabitha”).

Behind the scenes, it was Elizabeth Montgomery who suggested the character name Tabitha — spelled the traditional way, with an i.

But, for some unknown reason, the name was spelled Tabatha — with an a — on the credit role. Montgomery was later quoted as saying: “Honestly, I shudder every time I see it. It’s like a squeaky piece of chalk scratching on my nerves.” The spelling wasn’t corrected until season 5 (1968-1969).

Accordingly, the usage of both baby names rose during the ’60s, with Tabatha ranking higher than Tabitha for a three-year stretch before the spelling mistake in the credits was corrected:

Year Tabitha usage Tabatha usage
1971 947 [rank: 295th] 543 [rank: 398th]
1970 1,050 [rank: 279th] 585 [rank: 401st]
1969 944 [rank: 297th] 658 [rank: 355th]
1968 549 [rank: 391st] 701 [rank: 328th]
1967 444 [rank: 451st] 581 [rank: 378th]
1966 327 [rank: 524th] 500 [rank: 419th]
1965 34 5 [debut]
1964 22 unlisted
1963 21 unlisted

Adam

The name Adam more than doubled in usage over a two-year stretch thanks to Samantha and Darrin’s second child, Adam, who was born in October of 1969.

  • 1972: 5,748 baby boys named Adam [rank: 51st]
  • 1971: 5,855 baby boys named Adam [rank: 57th]
  • 1970: 4,320 baby boys named Adam [rank: 71st]
  • 1969: 2,869 baby boys named Adam [rank: 113th]
  • 1968: 2,546 baby boys named Adam [rank: 119th]
  • 1967: 2,528 baby boys named Adam [rank: 118th]

The name reached and maintained top-20 status for several years during the early 1980s.

…So are you a fan of Bewitched? Which names from the show do you like the best?

Sources:

Popular Baby Names in Belgium, 2017

According to data from Statistics Belgium, the country’s most popular baby names in 2017 were Emma and Liam.

Here are Belgium’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Emma, 634 baby girls
2. Olivia, 613
3. Louise, 595
4. Mila, 522
5. Alice, 423
6. Elise, 386
7. Lina, 375
8. Juliette, 364 (tie)
9. Sofia, 364 (tie)
10. Lucie, 350

Boy Names
1. Liam, 570 baby boys
2. Adam, 559
3. Arthur, 546
4. Noah, 545
5. Louis, 536
6. Lucas, 497
7. Jules, 462
8. Gabriel, 427
9. Victor, 422
10. Mohamed, 392

The #1 names within each of Belgium’s three regions were:

  • Brussels: Lina and Adam
  • Flanders: Louise and Liam
  • Wallonia: Emma and Gabriel

I forgot to post Belgium’s 2016 rankings, but in 2015 the top names overall were Emma and Louis.

Source: Prénoms filles et garçons

How to Name Fictional Characters

three tips on choosing a character name

How-to articles on naming fictional characters are a dime a dozen. But most are a litany of tips — some important, others not so much. So I thought I’d try boiling the best of the advice down to a single sentence. Here’s what I came up with:

“Each character’s name should fit the setting, fit the character, and be distinct within the story.”

The sentence contains three different objectives, so let’s look out each one separately:

Fit the setting

The name should be appropriate for the time and place in which the story occurs. A romance set in 18th-century England could be between an Elizabeth and a Frederick, but not a Nevaeh and a Jayden. Similarly, the protagonist of a 24th-century space opera could be named something standard/plain (John) or futuristic (Loxxan), but probably not something very old (Holmketill), or even slightly old (Clarence).

Fit the character

The name should suit the character, primarily in terms of permanent descriptors (e.g., gender, age, ethnicity), but also, perhaps, in terms of personality traits (e.g., bubbly, gracious, haughty).

Stereotyping in general is bad, but when it comes to character names, it’s very useful: You want the name to give the correct impression of the character right away. A woman from India should be named Padma, not Margaret. A man from Germany should be called Armin, not Oakley.

You could also take it a step further and choose a name that reflects the character’s personality in a subtle way. A friendly woman could be an Amy, while a complex woman could be Demetria. Do this mainly with sounds and associations, which will be picked up instantly by the reader.

Be distinct within the story

The name should not look or sound similar to any of the other names in the story, or else the reader could get confused. Pay special attention to first letters and to repeated sounds. If the protagonists are sisters, name them Mila and Harriet, not Katie and Kelly. Likewise, if the main characters are brothers, use the names Brian and Luke, not Aidan and Adam.

…What are your thoughts on this topic?

Popular Baby Names in Sweden, 2017

According to Statistics Sweden, the most popular baby names in the country in 2017 were Alice and William.

Here are Sweden’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Alice, 888 baby girls
2. Alicia, 675
3. Olivia, 634
4. Ella, 607
5. Ebba, 594
6. Lilly, 577
7. Astrid, 572
8. Saga, 569
9. Freja, 568
10. Wilma, 556

Boy Names
1. William, 941 baby boys
2. Oscar, 896
3. Liam, 823
4. Lucas, 793
5. Oliver, 765
6. Alexander, 701
7. Elias, 681
8. Hugo, 670
9. Noah, 654
10. Adam, 613

In the girls’ top 10, Astrid, Freja and Saga replace Maja, Elsa, and Julia.

In the boys’ top 10, Adam replaces Charlie.

“Maryam and Matteo have risen the most in 2017.”

In 2016, the top two names were Alice and Oscar.

Source: Name Statistics – Statistics Sweden