How popular is the baby name Adelina in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Adelina and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Adelina.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Adelina

Number of Babies Named Adelina

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Adelina

The Baby Name Sissieretta

sissieretta jonesSissieretta Jones was a famous African-American soprano who performed both nationally and internationally from the late 1880s to the mid-1910s.

She began her career as an opera singer, earning the nickname “Black Patti” in reference to Italian opera singer Adelina Patti. (She was not a fan of the nickname.)

She sang for presidents and royalty, but racism prevented her from performing in most American concert halls. So in the mid-1890s she switched over to popular music, headlining the successful traveling show the “Black Patti Troubadours.”

Sissieretta’s unique name — originally her middle name (her first name was Matilda) — appears to be a blend of Sissie and the name of her mother, Henrietta.

Though she isn’t well remembered today, I’ve found dozens of people named in her honor including Sissieretta Duncan (born in 1893) and Sisseretta Valentine (born in 1920).

What do you think of the name Sissieretta?

Sources: Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones – Wikipedia, The Rhode Island Music Hall of Fame Class of 2013
Image: White House Historical Association


Female Names in the Domesday Book

Female Names in the Domesday Book

We looked at names from King Henry III’s fine rolls (13th century) a couple of weeks ago, so now let’s go back a bit further and look at names from the Domesday Book (11th century).

What is the Domesday Book?

It’s a land survey, compiled in 1086, that covered much of England and parts of Wales.

The Domesday Book provides extensive records of landholders, their tenants, the amount of land they owned, how many people occupied the land (villagers, smallholders, free men, slaves, etc.), the amounts of woodland, meadow, animals, fish and ploughs on the land (if there were any) and other resources, any buildings present (churches, castles, mills, salthouses, etc.), and the whole purpose of the survey – the value of the land and its assets, before the Norman Conquest, after it, and at the time of Domesday.

The book is held at The National Archives in London, but its contents are available online at Open Domesday.

Most of the names in the Domesday Book are male, as most landowners were men. So, to be different (and to make things easier!) I thought I’d focus on the women.

The female names below appeared in the Open Domesday database just once, except where noted. (Multiple mentions don’t necessarily speak to name popularity, as this is not a representative sample of 11th-century people. Also, some individuals are simply mentioned in the book more than once.)

A

  • Adelaide
  • Adelina (2)
  • Adeliza
  • Aeldiet
  • Aeleva (3)
  • Aelfeva (9)
  • Aelfgyth (4)
  • Aelfrun
  • Aelfthryth
  • Aelgeat
  • Aelgyth
  • Aelrun
  • Aethelfled
  • Aethelgyth
  • Agnes (2)
  • Ailhilla
  • Aldeva
  • Aldgyth (13)
  • Aldhild
  • Aldwif
  • Aleifr
  • Aleva
  • Alfhild (3)
  • Alfled (3)
  • Alswith
  • Althryth
  • Alware
  • Alweis
  • Alwynn (2)
  • Asa
  • Asmoth
  • Azelina

B

  • Beatrix
  • Bothild
  • Bricteva (8)
  • Brictfled
  • Brictgyth

C

  • Christina
  • Cwenhild
  • Cwenleofu
  • Cwenthryth

D

  • Deorwynn
  • Dove

E

  • Edeva (8)
  • Edhild
  • Edith (5)
  • Edlufu
  • Egelfride
  • Emma (7)
  • Estrild
  • Eva

G

  • Goda (6)
  • Gode (2)
  • Godelind
  • Godesa
  • Godgyth (4)
  • Goldhild
  • Godhyse
  • Godiva (7)
  • Godrun
  • Goldeva
  • Goldrun
  • Gudhridh
  • Gunild (2)
  • Gunwor
  • Guthrun
  • Gytha (4)

H

  • Heloise (2)
  • Hawise

I

  • Ida
  • Ingifrith
  • Ingrith
  • Isolde

J

  • Judith

L

  • Lefleda
  • Leodfled
  • Leofcwen
  • Leofeva (9)
  • Leoffled (4)
  • Leofgyth
  • Leofhild
  • Leofrun
  • Leofsidu
  • Leofswith
  • Leofwaru
  • Leohteva

M

  • Matilda (3)
  • Mawa
  • Menleva
  • Mereswith
  • Merwynn
  • Mild
  • Modeva
  • Molleva
  • Muriel

O

  • Odfrida
  • Odil
  • Odolina
  • Oia
  • Olova
  • Oseva

Q

  • Queneva

R

  • Regnild
  • Rohais (2)

S

  • Saegyth
  • Saehild
  • Saelufu
  • Saewaru
  • Saieva
  • Sigrith
  • Skialdfrith
  • Stanfled
  • Sunneva

T

  • Tela
  • Thorild
  • Thorlogh
  • Tova
  • Tovild
  • Turorne
  • Tutfled

W

  • Wigfled
  • Wulfeva (9)
  • Wulffled (2)
  • Wulfgyth
  • Wulfrun
  • Wulfwaru (2)
  • Wulfwynn (2)

See anything you like?

Also, did you notice the names of Scandinavian origin (e.g., Guthrun, Ingrith, Sigrith)? “These names are most numerous in the eastern half of the country, particularly Yorkshire and Lincolnshire. This is precisely where, as we know from other evidence, there was a substantial settlement of Scandinavian immigrants.”

UPDATE: Here are the Male Names in the Domesday Book.

Sources:

Image: National Archives (UK)

Baby Names Needed for the Twin Siblings of Beatrix

A reader named Marissa, who has a daughter named Beatrix Penelope (nn Bea), is expecting twins–one boy, one girl. She’s got their middle names narrowed down (Anthony or Alexander for the baby boy, Daphne or Jillian for the baby girl) but she’d like some help with their first names.

Here’s what she’s looking for in a boy name:

For the boy I’d like names that are two syllables long and start and end in a consonant. So far I like Robert, Patrick, Daniel and Fabian. The only one he likes is Fabian, but we’re still not sure.

And here’s what she’s looking for in a girl name:

For the girl I’d like names that are three or four syllables long, and start and end in a vowel. So far I like Anastasia, Ophelia, Elena and Ursula, but he likes none of them.

The babies’ last name will sound something like Thisbe.

Here are some of the boy names I came up with:

Calvin
Clement
Chester
Conrad
Curtis
David
Declan
Dexter
Duncan
Felix
Franklin
Holden
Howard
Jasper
Kenneth
Lincoln
Linus
Lucas
Malcolm
Martin
Maxwell
Miles
Mitchell
Nathan
Nelson
Nigel
Nolan
Philip
Raymond
Reuben
Roland
Roman
Silas
Simon
Stuart
Thomas
Victor
Vincent
William
Winston

And here are some ideas for the girl name:

Acantha
Adela
Adelina
Adriana
Agatha
Alexandra
Alexina
Alicia
Allegra
Althea
Amelia
Annabella
Andrea
Angela
Antonia
Arabella
Araminta
Athena
Augusta
Aurelia
Aurora
Azalea
Eleanora
Eliana
Elisa
Eloisa
Estella
Eugenia
Eulalia
Imelda
Iona
Irena/Irina
Isabella
Isidora
Octavia
Odelia
Odessa
Olivia
Olympia
Ottilia

Which of the above do you like best with Beatrix? (And which ones make the best boy/girl pairings, do you think?)

What other names would you suggest to Marissa?

Baby Name Buffet – Charlotte, Madeleine, Suzette, Victoria

Are you a foodie? If so, this list might help you choose a baby name and spark a few meal ideas at the same time.

Below are dishes featuring female names; tomorrow I’ll post a list of dishes featuring male names. (If you try any of the recipes, let me know how they taste!)

Name Dish Namesake (if known)
Adelina Poularde Adelina Patti Adelina Patti, (1843-1919), singer
Agnès Nonnettes de poulet Agnès Sorel Agnès Sorel (1422-1450), mistress of King Charles VII of France
Alexandra Gâteau Alexandra Queen Alexandra of Denmark (1844-1925)
Alice Consommé Princess Alice Princess Alice, Countess of Athlone (1883-1981)
Anna Pommes Anna One of the grandes cocottes of the Napoleon III era, according to Julia Child
Béatrice Rissoles of crawfish à la Béatrice
Betty Brown Betty
Camille Lobster à la Camille
Charlotte Charlotte Russe Possibly Queen Charlotte (1744-1818)
Clara Chaudfroid de poulet à la Clara Morris Clara Morris (1848-1925), actress
Emma Coupe Emma Calvé Emma Calvé (1858-1942), singer
Hélène Poire Belle Hélène
Henriette Beefsteak à la Henriette
Jenny Jenny Lind Soup Jenny Lind (1820-1887), singer
Juliette Eggs à la Juliette
Lucia St. Lucia buns Saint Lucia (283-304)
Madeleine Madeleines Madeleine Paulmier (18th or 19th century), chef
Margherita Pizza Margherita Queen Margherita of Savoy (1851-1926)
Marguerite Chicken Marguerite
Martha Martha Washington’s Great Cake Martha Washington (1731-1802), former First Lady
Mary Poires Mary Garden Mary Garden (1874-1967), singer
Melba Peach Melba Nellie Melba (1859-1931), singer
Olga Consommé Olga
Rachel Tournedos Rachel Elisa-Rachel Félix (1821-1858), singer
Rebecca Rebecca Pudding
Sarah Sarah Bernhardt Cakes Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923), actress
Susette Eggs Susette
Suzette Crepe Suzette Dinner companion of King Edward VII (who was Prince of Wales at the time)
Theodora Consommé Theodora
Victoria Victoria Sponge Cake Queen Victoria (1819-1901)

Edit, Nov. 2009: Just found out about a post on named foods at CakeSpy.com. Here’s the link: Sweet Celebrities: A List of Pastries and Desserts Named After People.

Huge List of Anagram Baby Names

anagram baby names

Looking for baby names with something in common? Perhaps for a set of twins or triplets? I’ve collected hundreds of anagram baby names for you.

2-Letter Anagram Baby Names

3-Letter Anagram Baby Names

4-Letter Anagram Baby Names

5-Letter Anagram Baby Names

6-Letter Anagram Baby Names

7-Letter Anagram Baby Names

8-Letter Anagram Baby Names

9-Letter Anagram Baby Names

10-Letter Anagram Baby Names

If you like the idea of anagrams but want to avoid sound-alike sets, I recommend anagrams with different numbers of syllables. Pairs like “Etta and Tate” and “Clay and Lacy” are a far more subtle than pairs like “Enzo and Zeno” and “Mary and Myra.”

(Here are some palindromic names from last month.)