How popular is the baby name Aladdin in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Aladdin and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Aladdin.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.


Popularity of the Baby Name Aladdin

Number of Babies Named Aladdin

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Aladdin

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: Letters X & Y

yola d'avril, starlet, actress, y-name
Yola d’Avril (1907-1984)
Here’s the next installment of rare feminine names collected from very old films (1910s, 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s).

Xandra
Xandra was a character played by actress Joan Bennett in the film Scotland Yard (1930).

Yancey
Yancey was a character played by actress Betty Furness in the film A Wicked Woman (1934).

Yannaia
Yannaia was a character played by actress Pola Negri in the film Sumurun (1920).

Yansci
Yansci “Jenny” Dolly was a Hungarian-born character played by actress Betty Grable in the film The Dolly Sisters (1945).

Yasmani
Yasmani was a character played by actress Myrna Loy in the film The Black Watch (1929).

Yasmini
Yasmini was a character played by actress Gertrude Messinger in the film Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp (1917).

Yester
Yester was a character played by actress Gertrude Michael in the film The Hidden Menace (1938).

Yetiva
Princess Yetiva was a character played by actress Adrienne Kroell in the short film Cinderella (1912).

Yetive
Princess Yetive was a character played by actress Beverly Bayne in the film Graustark (1915) and by actress Norma Talmadge in the remake Graustark (1925).

Yetta
Yetta was a character name in multiple films such as One Clear Call (1922) and Caught in the Draft (1941).

Ynez
Ynez de Torreno was a character played by actress Vivian Rich in the short film The Navy Aviator (1914).

Yola
Yola d’Avril was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1950s. She was born in France in 1907. Yola was also a character played by actress Sari Maritza in the film Monte Carlo Madness (1932).

Yolande
Yolande was a character name in multiple films such as The Love of Princess Yolande (short, 1914) and Lights of New York (1916).

Yoli
Yoli Haydn was a character played by actress Constance Bennett in the film Ladies in Love (1936).

Yona
Yona Landowska was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s.

Yonna
Yonna was a character played by actress Carmel Myers in the film The Devil’s Circus (1926).

Ysail
Ysail was a character played by actress Pauline Curley in the film Bound in Morocco (1918).

Ysidora
Donna Ysidora Sepulveda was a character played by actress Alice Joyce in the short film An American Invasion (1912).

Ysobel
Ysobel was a character name in multiple films, including The Yaqui (1916) and Men of Tomorrow (1932).

Yve
Princess Yve was a character played by actress Gladys Brockwell in the film The Mother of His Children (1920).


2 Tips for Using Literary Character Names as Baby Names

You want to name your baby after a literary character? That’s great. Character names often make good baby names. But they don’t always make good baby names. How can you tell if the name you like is a good one? Here are two tips that might help.

Read the Source

You’ve seen the movie? Flipped through the CliffsNotes? Read the Wikipedia entry? Doesn’t matter. If you haven’t read the story, you don’t know the character. And if you don’t know the character, you may be in for an unpleasant surprise.

Iago, Tamburlaine, Quentin, Sauron….interesting names, but if you’ve never read Shakespeare, or Marlowe, or Faulkner, or Tolkien, you might not know that they represent some flawed and/or cruel characters.

The only way you’ll be able to make an informed decision about whether or not a character makes a worthy namesake is if you read the source.

Don’t Overshadow Your Child

Aladdin. Cinderella. D’Artagnan. Dracula. Frodo. Gatsby. Hamlet. Pangloss. Pinocchio. Quixote. Renesmee. Sherlock. Tarzan. Yossarian.

I can think of several reasons why giving a baby one of the names above would be a bad idea. One of the most compelling, in my opinion, is that names as distracting as these may upstage your child and take away from his or her achievements.

If Emma Miller does something notable, she’ll be congratulated. If Cinderella Jones does the same thing, she’ll be asked about her unusual name. (And maybe later she’ll be congratulated.)

If Jacob Wilson breaks into a burning house and rescues a family of five before firefighters arrive, people will say he’s a hero. If Tarzan Smith does the same thing, people will snicker. They’ll ask him if he swung in on a vine, or if the flames singed his loincloth.

What other tips can you come up with for people who are looking to literature for baby names?