How popular is the baby name Ali in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Ali.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Ali


Posts that Mention the Name Ali

Numerology & Baby Names: Number 4

baby names that add up to 4, numerologically

Here are hundreds of baby names that have a numerological value of “4.”

I’ve sub-categorized them by overall totals, because I think that some of the intermediate numbers could have special significance to people as well.

Within each group, I’ve listed up to ten of the most popular “4” names per gender (according to the current U.S. rankings).

Beneath all the names are some ways you could interpret the numerological value of “4,” including descriptions from two different numerological systems.

4 via 13

The following baby names add up to 13, which reduces to four (1+3=4).

  • “13” girl names: Cai, Eh, Ece, Gea
  • “13” boy names: Cade, Cai, Al, Eh, Cj, Jc, Dace, La

4 via 22

The following baby names add up to 22, which reduces to four (2+2=4).

  • “22” girl names: Lia, Kaia, Ila, Giada, Ali, Hala, Aicha, Bibi, Lee, Adel
  • “22” boy names: Ali, Lee, Dale, Hadi, Bane, Mace, Akai, Adel, Boe, Agam

4 via 31

The following baby names add up to 31, which reduces to four (3+1=4).

  • “31” girl names: Blake, Demi, Kara, Macie, Miah, Aliah, Janae, Delia, Haddie, Gina
  • “31” boy names: Jacob, Blake, Kaleb, Cash, Kane, Ahmed, Koda, Taj, Gian, Cedar

4 via 40

The following baby names add up to 40, which reduces to four (4+0=4).

  • “40” girl names: Maya, Lola, Angela, Kiara, Megan, Alaya, Linda, Maleah, Kenia, Hailee
  • “40” boy names: David, Diego, Camden, Jude, Zaid, Neil, Lucca, Allan, Boden, Abner

4 via 49

The following baby names add up to 49, which reduces to four (4+9=13; 1+3=4).

  • “49” girl names: Emilia, Athena, Jayla, Logan, Kyla, Harlee, Karen, Dallas, Aliza, Milan
  • “49” boy names: Logan, Luke, Aaron, Jose, Ayden, Milo, Adriel, Dallas, Milan, Bruce

4 via 58

The following baby names add up to 58, which reduces to four (5+8=13; 1+3=4).

  • “58” girl names: Lily, Arianna, Liliana, Natalia, Daisy, Josie, Nicole, Ariella, Aniyah, Ryan
  • “58” boy names: Ryan, Nathan, Miles, Jesse, Holden, Hayes, Pedro, Albert, Kieran, Isaias

4 via 67

The following baby names add up to 67, which reduces to four (6+7=13; 1+3=4).

  • “67” girl names: Gabriella, Michelle, Ruth, Lyric, Paislee, Kaliyah, Aurelia, Jessie, Brylee, Jillian
  • “67” boy names: Julian, Dominic, Miguel, Bradley, Jensen, Jaylen, Brycen, Julio, Cullen, Marcelo

4 via 76

The following baby names add up to 76, which reduces to four (7+6=13; 1+3=4).

  • “76” girl names: Kinley, Emory, Lorelei, Rory, Hayley, Addisyn, Emmeline, Ansley, Kathleen, Kataleya
  • “76” boy names: Thomas, Emmett, Dawson, Jeremy, Louis, Rory, Dexter, Nixon, Jerry, Sylas

4 via 85

The following baby names add up to 85, which reduces to four (8+5=13; 1+3=4).

  • “85” girl names: Anastasia, Gracelyn, Brinley, Ainsley, Madisyn, Aubrielle, Tinley, Paityn, Sevyn, Finnley
  • “85” boy names: Steven, Donovan, Kayson, Franklin, Finnley, Boston, Ulises, Korbyn, Zackary, Jovanni

4 via 94

The following baby names add up to 94, which reduces to four (9+4=13; 1+3=4).

  • “94” girl names: Willow, Genevieve, Harmony, Evangeline, Alessandra, Antonella, Bernadette, Kinsleigh, Emberlyn, Aislynn
  • “94” boy names: Braxton, Jaxtyn, Brayson, Everest, Reynaldo, Trevon, Jiovanni, Sebastien, Alexandro, Gregorio

4 via 103

The following baby names add up to 103, which reduces to four (1+0+3=13).

  • “103” girl names: Princess, Scarlette, Roslyn, Merritt, Nicolette, Rosemarie, Justyce, Valkyrie, Violett, Xitlaly
  • “103” boy names: Greyson, Solomon, Yisroel, Zeppelin, Marquise, Merritt, Perseus, Tiberius, Jaxston, Tyrus

4 via 112

The following baby names add up to 112, which reduces to four (1+1+2=4).

  • “112” girl names: Brooklyn, Emmersyn, Victory, Weslynn, Divinity, Odyssey, Reighlynn, Zeplynn, Kopelynn, Houston
  • “112” boy names: Stetson, Valentino, Guillermo, Houston, Zayvion, Brooklyn, Augustin, Hawthorne, Ollivander, Trayson

4 via 121

The following baby names add up to 121, which reduces to four (1+2+1=4).

  • “121” girl names: Persephone, Courtney, Tiaraoluwa, Kierstyn, Zonnique, Amarachukwu, Morrison, Cortlynn, Estrellita, Ivylynn
  • “121” boy names: Courtney, Morrison, Kristofer, Christofer, Quintus, Aloysius, Trysten, Christophe, Trustin, Zymarion

4 via 130

The following baby names add up to 130, which reduces to four (1+3+0=4).

  • “130” girl names: Oluwatoni, Mariaguadalupe, Monzerrat, Viktoriya, Christionna, Constantina
  • “130” boy names: Wynston, Prynceton, Xzayvier, Souleymane, Washington, Oluwaseyi, Oluwatoni, Juventino, Ugochukwu, Oluwakorede

4 via 139

The following baby names add up to 139, which reduces to four (1+3+9=13; 1+3=4).

  • “139” girl names: Gwyndolyn, Oluwadamilola, Anuoluwapo, Christopher, Quetzally, Mariavictoria, Kymberlynn
  • “139” boy names: Christopher, Kristopher, Martavious, Fitzpatrick, Oluwadamilola

4 via 148

The following baby names add up to 148, which reduces to four (1+4+8=13; 1+3=4).

  • “148” girl names: Oluwateniola, Marykatherine, Moyinoluwa, Oluwatobiloba
  • “148” boy names: Oluwatobiloba, Michaelanthony

4 via 157

The boy name Marquavious adds up to 157, which reduces to four (1+5+7=13; 1+3=4).

4 via 166

The boy name Muhammadyusuf adds up to 166, which reduces to four (1+6+6=13; 1+3=4).

4 via 175

The unisex names Kosisochukwu adds up to 175, which reduces to four (1+7+5=13; 1+3=4).

What Does “4” Mean?

First, we’ll look at the significance assigned to “4” by two different numerological sources. Second, and more importantly, ask yourself if “4” or any of the intermediate numbers above have any special significance to you.

Numerological Attributes

“4” (the tetrad) according to the Pythagoreans:

  • “Anatolius reports that it is called ‘justice,’ since the square (i.e., the area) […] is equal to the perimeter”
  • “It is the prerequisite of the general orderliness of the universe, so they everywhere called it a ‘custodian of Nature.'”
  • “Everything in the universe turns out to be completed in the natural progression up to the tetrad”
  • “The tetrad is the first to display the nature of solidity: the sequence is point, line, plane, solid (i.e. body).”
  • Examples of things that are divided into four parts:
    • “four traditional seasons of the year — spring, summer, autumn and winter.”
    • “four elements (fire, air, water and earth)”
    • “four cardinal points”
    • “four distinguishing points – ascendant, descendant, mid-heaven and nadir”
    • “Some say that all things are organized by four aspects – substance, shape, form and principle.”

“4” according to Edgar Cayce:

  • “In four, it makes for the greater weaknesses in the divisions…four being more of a division and weakness” (reading 261-15).
  • “In four, we find that of a division – and while a beauty in strength, in the divisions also makes for the greater weakness” (reading 5751-1).
Personal/Cultural Significance

Does “4” — or do any of the other numbers above (e.g., 22, 49, 76, 103) — have any special significance to you?

Think about your own preferences and personal experiences: lucky numbers, birth dates, music, sports, and so on. Maybe your favorite football team is the San Francisco 49ers, for example.

Also think about associations you may have picked up from your culture, your religion, or society in general.

If you have any interesting insights about the number 4, or any of the other numbers above, please leave a comment!

Source: Theologumena Arithmeticae, attributed to Iamblichus (c.250-c.330).

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: Letter M (part 2)

merna kennedy, actress, cinema, nameLooking for a rare girl name with a retro feel? Here are dozens of ideas. All came straight from very old films that were released from the 1910s to the 1940s.

This is part of a series of posts featuring female names from early cinema. The names below are the second half of the M-list (Me- to My-). The first half includes all the Ma- names.

Enjoy!

Medelina
Medelina was a character played by actress Laura La Varnie in the short film The Nurse at Mulberry Bend (1913).

Meena
Meena was a character played by actress Dorothy Gish in the film Little Meena’s Romance (1916).

  • Usage of the baby name Meena.

Menne O Wa
Meene O Wa was a character played by actress Gertrude Robinson in the short film Before the White Man Came (1912).

Meenie
Meenie Van Winkle was a character played by actress Gertrude Messinger in the film Rip Van Winkle (1921).

Meetah
Meetah was a character played by actress Soledad Jimenez in the film Forbidden Valley (1938).

Megildis
Megildis was a character played by actress Florence Winston in the film The Miracle (1912).

Meggie
Meggie was a character played by actress Jean Cadell in the film Jassy (1947).

  • Usage of the baby name Meggie.

Mehitable
Mehitable was a character played by actress Eugenie Forde in the film The Road to Divorce (1920).

Melahi
Melahi was a character played by actress Maria Montez in the film South of Tahiti (1941).

Melba
Melba was a character name in multiple films, including Mind Your Own Business (1936) and Pinky (1949).

  • Usage of the baby name Melba.

Melisande
Melisande was a character played by actress Renée Adorée in the film The Big Parade (1925).

Melisse
Melisse was a character played by actress Eugenie Besserer in the short film Partners (1912).

Melissy
Melissy was a character played by actress Ethel Wales in the film Lovers’ Lane (1924).

Melitta
Melitta was a character name in multiple films, including The Alcalde’s Conspiracy (short, 1912) and The Cohens and Kellys in Atlantic City (1929).

Mellitta
Mellitta was a character played by actress Lya De Putti in the film Phantom (1922).

Mem
Remember “Mem” Steddon was a character played by actress Eleanor Boardman in the film Souls for Sale (1923).

Memory
Memory Baird was a character played by actress Fritzi Brunette in the film Jacques of the Silver North (1919).

  • Usage of the baby name Memory.

Menote
Menote was a character played by actress Francelia Billington in the short film The Pride of Angry Bear (1913).

Mera
Mera Donovan was a character played by actress Vola Vale in the film The Iron Rider (1920).

  • Usage of the baby name Mera.

Merapi
Merapi was a character played by actress Maria Corda in the film The Moon of Israel (1924).

Mercedita
Mercedita was a character played by actress Margaret Cullington in the film Tropical Love (1921).

Merceita
Merceita Esmond was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Pennsylvania in 1869.

Mercia
Mercia was a character name in multiple films, including Another Man’s Shoes (1922) and The Sign of the Cross (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Mercia.

Merle
Merle Oberon was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1970s. She was born in British India in 1911. Her birth name was Estelle Merle Thompson.

  • Usage of the baby name Merle.

Merna
Merna Kennedy was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1930s. She was born in Illinois in 1908. Her birth name was Maude Kahler.

  • Usage of the baby name Merna.

Merope
Merope was a character played by actress Mrs. A. C. Marston in the short film Madelaine Morel (1916).

Merrilla
Merrilla was a character played by actress Annette Kellerman in the film Queen of the Sea (1918).

Merta
Merta Sterling was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Wisconsin in 1883.

  • Usage of the baby name Merta.

Mertice
Mertice Kenare was a character played by actress Francelia Billington in the short film The Father (1915).

Meryllyn
Meryllyn was a character played by actress Ollie Kirby in the short film The Barnstormers (1915).

Mescal
Mescal was a character played by actress Bebe Daniels in the film The Heritage of the Desert (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Mescal.

Mesquite
Mesquite was a character played by actress Marin Sais in the short film The Big Horn Massacre (1913).

Messalina
Messalina was a character name in multiple films, including Safety in Numbers (1930) and I, Claudius (1937).

Meta
Meta was a character name in multiple films, including Misbehaving Ladies (1931) and Out of the Past (1947).

  • Usage of the baby name Meta.

Metta
Metta was a character played by actress Muriel Ostriche in the film The Dormant Power (1917).

  • Usage of the baby name Metta.

Michelna
Michelna Libelt was a character played by actress Vivian Martin in the film The Trouble Buster (1917).

Mici
Mici was a character played by actress Marguerite Clark in the film The Seven Sisters (1915).

Mickey
Mickey was a character played by actress Mabel Normand in the film Mickey (1918).

  • Usage of the baby name Mickey.

Mida
Mida was a character name in multiple films, including Grand Central Murder (1942) and Mystery Broadcast (1943).

  • Usage of the baby name Mida.

Midge
Midge was a character name in multiple films, including The Two-Fisted Sheriff (1925) and Time Out for Romance (1937).

  • Usage of the baby name Midge.

Mifanwy
Mifanwy was a character name in multiple films, including Mifanwy: A Tragedy (1913) and A Welsh Singer (1916).

Mignon
Mignon Anderson was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Maryland in 1892. Mignon was also a character name in multiple films, including The Drive for a Life (short, 1909) and Mignon (short, 1912).

  • Usage of the baby name Mignon.

Mignonne
Mignonne Golden was an actress who appeared in films in the 1920s. She was born in England in 1904.

Miki
Miki was a character played by actress Olga San Juan in the film Rainbow Island (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Miki.

Milada
Milada Mladova was an actress who appeared in films from the 1940s to the 1950s. She was born Oklahoma in 1921. Her birth name was Annabel Milada Mraz. Milada was also a character played by actress Luise Rainer in the film Hostages (1943).

  • Usage of the baby name Milada.

Mima
Mima was a character played by actress Dorothy Lamour in the film Road to Singapore (1940).

  • Usage of the baby name Mima.

Mimba
Mimba was a character played by actress Mathilde Comont in the film The Sea Bat (1930).

Mimi
Mimi was a character name in multiple films, including The Call of the Traumerei (1914) and Who’s Your Lady Friend? (1937).

  • Usage of the baby name Mimi.

Mimitta
Mimitta was a character played by actress Iris Ashton in the film The Dancer of the Nile (1923).

Mimsey
Mimsey was a character played by actress Virginia Weidler in the film Peter Ibbetson (1935).

Mimsi
Mimsi was a character played by actress Elsie Ferguson in the film Forever (1921).

Min
Min was a character name in multiple films, including The Fringe of Society (1917) and Min and Bill (1930).

  • Usage of the baby name Min.

Minetta
Minetta was a character played by actress Jessie Ralph in the film The Kid from Texas (1939).

Minette
Minette Bunker was a character played by actress Viola Dana in the film The Great Love (1925).

Minna
Minna Grey was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in England in 1877. Minna Gombell was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1950s. She was born in Maryland in 1892. Minna was also a character name in multiple films, including Perils of the Secret Service (1917) and The Oath (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Minna.

Minnetake
Minnetake was a character played by actress Hedda Nova in the film The Gold Hunters (1925).

Minnette
Minnette Christiewas a character played by actress Edna Murphy in the film Ermine and Rhinestones (1925).

Minta
Minta Durfee was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1970s. She was born in California in 1889. Her birth name was Araminta Estelle Durfee.

Minty
Minty Sharpe was a character played by actress Beatriz Michelena in the film A Phyllis of the Sierras (1915).

Miora
Lady Miora was a character played by actress Kate Lester in the film Beau Brummel (1924).

Mirabel
Mirabel was a character played by actress Frances Dee in the film The Gay Deception (1935).

Mirah
Mirah was a character played by actress Ethel Kauffman in the short film Gwendolin (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Mirah.

Mirami
Mirami was a character played by actress Alma Rubens in the short film Banzai (1913).

Mirandy
Mirandy was a character name in multiple films, including Mirandy Smiles (1918) and His Buddy’s Wife (1925).

Mirella
Mirella was a character played by actress Dria Paola in the film Mr. Desire (1934).

Miriamne
Miriamne Esdras was a character played by mononymous actress Margo in the film Winterset (1936).

Mirza
Mirza was a character played by actress Anna Q. Nilsson in the short film The Second Commandment (1915).

  • Usage of the baby name Mirza.

Mississippi
Mississippi was a character name in multiple films, including Out in Happy Hollow (1914) and Red Barry (1938).

Missouri
Missouri Martin was a character played by Glenda Farrell in the film Lady for a Day (1933).

Missy
Missy Rose was a character played by actress Victoria Spivey in the film Hallelujah (1929).

  • Usage of the baby name Missy.

Mitchette
Mitchette Dubois was a character played by actress Winifred Allen in the film The Long Trail (1917).

Mitsi
Mitsi was a character played by actress Mary Philbin in the film The Rose of Paris (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Mitsi.

Mittie
Mittie was a character played by actress Dorothy Tree in the film While the Patient Slept (1935).

  • Usage of the baby name Mittie.

Mitty
Mitty Whipple was a character played by actress Fanny Midgley in the film The Heart of Youth (1919).

  • Usage of the baby name Mitty.

Mitzel
Mitzel was a character played by actress Betty Compson in the film Love Me and the World Is Mine (1927).

  • Usage of the baby name Mitzel.

Mitzi
Mitzi was a character name in multiple films, including The Enemy (1927) and My Weakness (1933).

  • Usage of the baby name Mitzi.

Mizzi
Mizzi was a character name in multiple films, including The Marriage Circle (1924) and A Sister of Six (1926).

M’liss
M’liss was a character name in multiple films, including M’Liss (1918) and The Girl Who Ran Wild (1922).

  • Usage of the baby name Mliss.

Moala
Moala was a character played by actress Lucille Moulton in the film The Adorable Savage (1920).

Modesta
Modesta was a character played by actress Goldie Colwell in the film The Yaqui (1916).

Modiste
Modiste was a character played by actress Betty Blythe in the film Stolen Love (1928).

Moina
Moina Robina was a character played by actress Margaret Gibson in the short film The Mystery of the Hidden House (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Moina.

Moitle
Moitle Perry was a character played by actress Fay Tincher in the short film Foiled Again (1914).

Molee
Molee was a character played by actress Linda Perry in the film The Great Garrick (1937).

Molla
Molla Hansen was a character played by actress Blanche Sweet in the film Why Women Love (1925).

  • Usage of the baby name Molla.

Momba
Momba was a character played by actress Winifred Greenwood in the film The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1910).

Mombi
Mombi was a character name in multiple films, including The New Wizard of Oz (1914) and The Land of Oz (1932).

Monaei
Monaei Lindley was an actress who appeared in films in the 1930s.

Monah
Monah was a character played by actress Mary Charleson in the short film The Ancient Bow (1912).

  • Usage of the baby name Monah.

Monelle
Monelle Picart was a character played by actress Dany Robin in the film Monelle (1948).

Monika
Princess Monika was a character played by Kathleen Vaughan in the film The Prince and the Beggarmaid (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Monika.

Moonlight
Moonlight was a character played by actress Ruth Roland in the short film The Loneliness of the Hills (1912).

Moonyean
Moonyean was a character played by actress Jeanette MacDonald in the film Smilin’ Through (1941).

Moonyeen
Moonyeen was a character name in multiple films, including Smilin’ Through (1922) and Smilin’ Through (1932).

Morag
Morag Lannon was a character played by actress Madge Stuart in the film A Gamble with Hearts (1923).

  • Usage of the baby name Morag.

Morella
Morella was a character name in multiple films, including Beyond the Rocks (1922) and Quicker’n Lightnin’ (1925).

  • Usage of the baby name Morella (which debuted in the data the year after Beyond the Rocks came out).

Morgianna
Morgianna was a character played by actress Gertrude Messinger in the film Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves (1918).

Morn
Morn Light was a character played by actress Ora Carew in the film Loot (1919).

Morna
Morna Dabney was a character played by actress Susan Hayward in the film Tap Roots (1948).

  • Usage of the baby name Morna.

Mousali
Mousali was a character played by actress Leah Baird in the film The Miracle (1912).

Movita
Movita was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1950s. She was born in Arizona in 1917. Her birth name was Maria Castaneda.

  • Usage of the baby name Movita.

Moya
Moya was a character name in multiple films, including Forked Trails (short, 1915) and My Wild Irish Rose (1922).

  • Usage of the baby name Moya.

Moyna
Moyna MacGill was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1960s. She was born in Ireland in 1895. Her birth name was Charlotte Lillian McIldowie. Moyna was also a character played by actress Colleen Moore in the film Come on Over (1922).

Moyra
Moyra was a character played by actress Alice Hollister in the short film The Shaughraun (1912).

  • Usage of the baby name Moyra.

Mozelle
Mozelle Britton was an actress who appeared in films in the 1930s. She was born in Oklahoma in 1912.

Mula
Mula was a character played by actress Mathilde Comont in the film The Sea Beast (1926).

Mulie
Mulie Davenant was a character played by actress Vivian Martin in the film The Wax Model (1917).

Mulvinia
Mulvinia Minchen was a character played by actress Flora Finch in the short film The Mistake in Typesetting (1915).

Muriel
Muriel Ostriche was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in New York in 1896.

  • Usage of the baby name Muriel.

Murieska
Murieska was a character played by actress Carrie Clark Ward in the film His Hour (1924).

Musa
Musa was a character played by actress Helen Gardner in the short film The Still, Small Voice (1915).

  • Usage of the baby name Musa.

Musette
Musette was a character name in multiple films, including La Vie de Boheme (1916) and On Ze Boulevard (1927).

Musidora
Musidora was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in France in 1889. Her birth name Jeanne Roques.

Myone
Myone Madrigal was a character played by actress Betty Francisco in the film Her Night of Nights (1922).

Myrle
Myrle Davis was a character played by actress Heather Angel in the film Time to Kill (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Myrle.

Myrna
Myrna Loy was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1980s. She was born in Montana in 1905. Myrna Dell was an actress who appeared in films from the 1940s to the 1980s. She was born in California in 1924. Her birth name was Marilyn Adele Dunlap. Myrna was also a character name in multiple films, including The Face or the Voice (short, 1912) and Broadway to Cheyenne (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Myrna.

Myrta
Myrta Bonillas was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1930s. She was born in Massachusetts in 1890. Myrta was also a character played by actress Ollie Kirby in the short film The Trap (1917).

  • Usage of the baby name Myrta.

Myrtle
Myrtle Gonzalez was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in California in 1891. Myrtle Stedman was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Illinois in 1885. Myrtle was also a character name in multiple films, including Salvation Nell (1931) and Rackateers in Exile (1937).

  • Usage of the baby name Myrtle.

Mystie
Mystie Stafford was a character played by actress Miriam Cooper in the short film Tide of Battle (1912).

  • Usage of the baby name Mystie.

Mytyl
Mytyl was a character name in multiple films, including The Blue Bird (1918) and The Blue Bird (1940).

…Which of the above names do you like best?

Source: IMDb

Name Quotes #56: Albert, Arthur, Otterly

sex and the city, movie quote, name quote

From the 2010 movie Sex and the City 2, characters Carrie and Aidan talk about Aidan’s three sons:

Carrie: “My god, three?”
Aidan: “Homer, Wyatt, Tate.”
Carrie: “Sounds like a country music band.”

From a Telegraph article about creative baby names by Flic Everett (born a Johanna, later changed to Felicity):

Very unusual names can, [psychotherapist Christophe Sauerwein] says, make a child stand out for the wrong reasons. “I have a patient aged ten, named Otterly,” he says (spelling it out, in case I confuse it with Ottilie, which now features regularly in Telegraph birth announcements). “It’s a very unusual name and she’s bullied about it. As a parent, you can love a name, but come on, think twice. Is it embarrassing? Will she have a lifetime of explaining herself to everyone she meets?”

From a Pop Sugar article about the naming Prince Charles and Princess Diana’s sons:

When Diana gave birth to her first son in June 1982, he was given the name William Arthur Philip Louis; two years later, Prince Harry was christened Henry Charles Albert David. In a recorded interview that would go on to be published in the controversial 1992 book Diana: Her Story by Andrew Morton, Diana admitted that she picked the first names for both of her newborn sons after nixing the ones Charles had in mind. When asked, “Who chose [Harry’s] name?,” Diana said, “I did,” adding, “I chose William and Harry, but Charles did the rest.” She went on: “He wanted Albert and Arthur, and I said no. Too old!”

From a biography of English actress Ellen Terry (1847-1928):

“Ellen Terry is the most beautiful name in the world; it rings like a chime through the last quarter of the nineteenth century,” George Bernard Shaw wrote of the Dame when she was at the height of her career.

From a Washington Post article about Korean companies forcing workers to go by English names:

The norm in South Korea is to call your colleagues or superiors not by their given names but by their positions. It’s the same for addressing your older friends or siblings, your teacher or any person on the street. So if your family name is Johnson and you were to be hired in a Korean company as a manager, your co-workers would call you “Johnson-boojang.” To get the attention of your older female friend, you would call for “eunni,” or “older sister.”

[…]

One popular Korean blog was more explicit on shirking honorifics in the workplace: “Dropping your pants and [urinating] in the person’s briefcase would be only a little ruder than calling him/her by his/her first name.”

From the abstract of a study looking at passenger discrimination by transportation network companies like Uber and Lyft (found via Baby Name Wizard):

In Boston, we observed discrimination by Uber drivers via more frequent cancellations against passengers when they used African American-sounding names. Across all trips, the cancellation rate for African American sounding names was more than twice as frequent compared to white sounding names.

From a 2016 Elle interview with comedian Alexandra “Ali” Wong in which Ali talks about her baby:

What’s her name?

Mari, inspired by my hero Marie Kondo, who wrote The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. She’s really wonderful, is very into eye contact, and has forced me to be a lot more present. It’s hard to be anxious about the future or depressed about the past when your baby does an explosive poo that somehow ends up in the feet part of her pajamas.

From a New York Times essay about Turkish-American names by Eren Orbey:

Had my mother, Neşe (pronounced neh-sheh), not already published articles under her birth name, she probably would have changed it upon naturalization. Lately, to avoid confusion, she has taken to introducing herself simply as “N,” which her accent converts into an American name. People hear “Anne,” and that is what they call her.

At the start of the essay, Eren mentions that his mother’s name means “joy” in Turkish.

Want to see more quotes about names? Check out the name quotes category.

Royal Baby Name: Farah

farah diba, 1959, iran, queen
Farah Diba on the cover of LIFE, 1959

The last Shah of Iran had three wives — first Fawzia, second Soraya, and finally Farah: Farah Diba, who was a 21-year-old commoner when she married the king in Tehran at the very end of 1959.

The Arabic name Farah, which means “joy,” appeared for the first time in the SSA’s baby name data the next year:

  • 1964: 11 baby girls named Farah
  • 1963: 13 baby girls named Farah
  • 1962: 14 baby girls named Farah
  • 1961: 12 baby girls named Farah
  • 1960: 19 baby girls named Farah [debut]
  • 1959: unlisted

The couple went on to have four children: Reza (the male heir the Shah had been waiting for), Farahnaz, Ali-Reza, and Leila.

Little Reza never got a chance to rule Iran, though, because the royal family was forced to flee during the Iranian Revolution at the end of the 1970s. By the time the Shah died of cancer in 1980, the new leader of the country was Ayatollah Khomeini.

The similar name Farrah first appeared in the data in the late ’60s. It would go on to see a dramatic spike in usage in 1976-1977 thanks to Farrah Fawcett (whose name at birth was actually Ferrah).

Another similar name, Fara, predates both Farah and Farrah on the charts. Fara has been in the U.S. data since the 1910s. (Other unexpected Sara- and Clara-clones from that era include Flara, Gara, Para, and Nara.)

Do you like the name Farah? Which spelling do you prefer?

P.S. The male names Reza and Alireza started appearing in the U.S. data in the ’60s and ’70s, respectively.

Pop Culture Baby Name Game Results, 2016

Here are the results of Pop Culture Baby Name Game 2016!

As usual, the disclaimer: Some of the names below were already on the rise. Others may have been influenced by more than just the single pop culture person/event listed. I leave it up to you to judge the degree/nature of pop culture influence in each case.

On to the names…

Luna, +849

  • Up from 2,796 baby girls in 2015 to 3,645 in 2016.
  • 6th-highest raw-number increase on the girls’ list in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: celebrity baby Luna Simone, daughter of singer John Legend and model Chrissy Teigen.

Camila, +765

Greyson, +704

  • Up from 3,591 baby boys in 2015 to 4,295 in 2016.
  • 8th-highest raw-number increase on the boys’ list in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: celebrity baby Greyson Valor, son of reality TV star Jenni “JWoww” Farley.

Adonis, +443

Kehlani, +272

Wade, +232

  • Up from 553 baby boys in 2015 to 785 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Deadpool (2016).

Prince, +187

  • Up from 820 baby boys in 2015 to 1,007 in 2016.
  • The name Princess also saw a jump in usage: 268 baby girls in 2015 to 369 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the death of Prince.

Lyanna, +154

  • Up from 62 baby girls in 2015 to 216 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the TV show Game of Thrones.

Alessia, +130

Wilder, +122

  • Up from 215 baby boys in 2015 to 337 in 2016.
  • 9th-highest ranking increase on the boys’ list in 2016.
  • Wilder also saw higher usage among baby girls: 22 in 2015 to 38 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the death of Gene Wilder.

Canaan, +99

  • Up from 283 baby boys in 2015 to 382 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: son of Oprah Winfrey (she announced this name in late 2015).
    • According to a 2010 biography, Winfrey’s son’s legal first name was Vincent.

Cyrus, +91

  • Up from 631 baby boys in 2015 to 722 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the TV mini-series Roots (2016).

Creed, +78

Bowie, +77

  • Up from 53 baby boys in 2015 to 130 in 2016.
  • Bowie also saw higher usage among baby girls: 43 in 2015 to 75 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the death of David Bowie.

Muhammad, +77

  • Up from 881 baby boys in 2015 to 958 in 2016.
  • The name Muhammadali also saw a jump in usage: 12 baby boys in 2015 to 24 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the death of Muhammad Ali.

Ivanka, +74

  • Up from 37 baby girls in 2015 to 111 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: Trump’s daughter Ivanka.

Cohen, +68

  • Up from 1,017 baby boys in 2015 to 1,085 in 2016.
  • Cohen also saw higher usage among baby girls: 12 in 2015 to 17 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the death of Leonard Cohen.

Queen, +49

  • Up from 148 baby girls in 2015 to 197 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influences: the TV show Queen Sugar (2016-) and the movie Queen of Katwe (2016).

Melania, +41

  • Up from 90 baby girls in 2015 to 131 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: Trump’s wife Melania.

Moana, +38

  • Up from 18 baby girls in 2015 to 56 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Moana (2016).

Jupiter, +36

  • Up from 42 baby girls in 2015 to 78 in 2016.
  • Jupiter also saw higher usage among baby boys: 25 in 2015 to 41 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter.

Hillary, +34

Simone, +33

  • Up from 340 baby girls in 2015 to 373 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influences: Olympic gymnast Simone Biles and celebrity baby Luna Simone.

Doris, +32

  • Up from 85 baby girls in 2015 to 117 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Hello, My Name Is Doris (2016).

Dream, +30

  • Up from 98 baby _s in 2015 to 128 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: Kardashian baby Dream Renée.

Rio, +29

  • Up from 103 baby boys in 2015 to 132 in 2016.
  • Rio also saw higher usage among baby girls: 38 in 2015 to 61 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Malachi, +27

  • Up from 2,558 baby boys in 2015 to 2,585 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the TV mini-series Roots (2016).

Ali, +23

  • Up from 1,060 baby boys in 2015 to 1,083 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the death of Muhammad Ali.

Barron, +20

  • Up from 74 baby boys in 2015 to 94 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: Trump’s son Barron.

Miesha, +19

  • Up from 13 baby girls in 2015 to 32 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: MMA fighter Miesha Tate.

Onyx, +18

  • Up from 38 baby girls in 2015 to 56 in 2016.
  • Onyx saw an even higher jump in usage among baby boys: 118 in 2015 to 172 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: celebrity baby Onyx Solace, daughter of Alanis Morissette.

Francis, +17

  • Up from 619 baby boys in 2015 to 636 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Deadpool (2016).

Merrick, +17

  • Up from 191 baby boys in 2015 to 208 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: Judge Merrick Garland.

Ajax, +16

  • Up from 17 baby boys in 2015 to 33 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Deadpool (2016).

Juno, +13

  • Up from 86 baby girls in 2015 to 99 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter.

Keanu, +13

  • Up from 197 baby boys in 2015 to 210 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Keanu (2016).

Halsey, re-entered with 12

  • After an absence, returned to the list with 12 baby girls in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: singer Halsey (born Ashley Nicolette Frangipane).

Valor, +12

  • Up from 78 baby boys in 2015 to 90 in 2016.
  • Valor also saw higher usage among baby girls: 6 in 2015 to 14 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: celebrity baby Greyson Valor, son of reality TV star Jenni “JWoww” Farley.

Hamilton, +11

  • Up from 86 baby boys in 2015 to 97 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the Broadway musical Hamilton.

Sanders, +11

  • Up from 12 baby boys in 2015 to 23 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: presidential candidate Bernie Sanders.

Bernie, +10

  • Up from 11 baby boys in 2015 to 21 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: presidential candidate Bernie Sanders.

Omran, +10

  • Up from 7 baby boys in 2015 to 17 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: Syrian boy Omran Daqneesh.

Elle, +9

  • Up from 816 baby girls in 2015 to 825 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: singer Elle King.

Teresa, +9

  • Up from 426 baby girls in 2015 to 435 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: canonization of Mother Teresa.

Dak, re-entered with 8

  • After an absence, returned to the list with 8 baby boys in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: NFL player Rayne Dakota “Dak” Prescott.

Wrigley, +8

  • Up from 22 baby boys in 2015 to 30 in 2016.
  • Wrigley also saw higher usage among baby girls: 15 in 2015 to 18 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: Chicago Cubs’ World Series win.

Boomer, +7

  • Up from 5 baby boys in 2015 to 12 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: celebrity baby Boomer Robert, son of Michael Phelps.

Dory, re-entered with 6

  • After an absence, returned to the list with 6 baby girls in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Finding Dory (2016).

Maui, re-entered with 5

  • After an absence, returned to the list with 5 baby boys in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Moana (2016).

Wilson, +5

  • Up from 433 baby boys in 2015 to 438 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Deadpool (2016).

Sully, +4

  • Up from 17 baby boys in 2015 to 21 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Sully (2016).

Teyana, +3

  • Up from 47 baby girls in 2015 to 50 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: singer Teyana Taylor.

Draymond, +2

  • Up from 6 baby boys in 2015 to 8 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: NBA player Draymond Green.

Daya, +1

  • Up from 42 baby girls in 2015 to 43 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: singer Daya (born Grace Martine Tandon).

Names that went down in usage from 2015 to 2016:

Names not in the SSA data in either 2015 or 2016:

  • Angel Dust
  • Aroldis
  • Bison
  • Broncs
  • Cubby
  • Curiosity
  • Dopinder
  • Eleven
  • Emayatzy
  • E’myri
  • Esperanto
  • Hermine
  • Ingwen
  • Jikan
  • Jonbenet
  • Lorca
  • Kunta
  • Laremy
  • Linmanuel
  • Maga
  • MacGyver
  • Mountain
  • Moushumi
  • Ode
  • Phiona
  • Regé-Jean
  • Rykiel
  • Trump
  • Usain
  • Voltron
  • Zobrist

Some initial reactions…

I was surprised that Adonis and Wade jumped in usage as much as they did.

I was also surprised that Wrigley barely jumped at all in usage. Maybe “Wrigley” reminds too many people of gum?

usain bolt, race, 100m, rio, olympics
© 2016 Cameron Spencer/Getty

Where the heck is Usain? Why is Usain not in the data yet? Sure, track and field is relatively unpopular in the United States. Still, I thought Rio might do it — with the help of that viral photo of Usain Bolt cheekily grinning at the competition in the middle of that 100 meter sprint.

Finally, as a former ’80s kid, I did have my fingers crossed for Voltron. Oh well…

How about you? Did any of these rises/falls surprise you?

P.S. Some of the names from the 2015 Pop Culture Baby Name Game that have started/continued to do well: Adaline, Arlo, Bjorn, Bryshere, Finn, Furiosa, Gigi, Hakeem, Jedi, Joy, Kylo, Lagertha, Lucious, Margot, Mars, Rey, Saint, and Sullivan. Even more interesting is Atticus, which saw a drop in usage in 2016 after rising steadily for years. (Here’s more about Atticus and the Go Set a Watchman debacle.) The usage of Becky decreased as well — could Beyoncé’s song “Sorry” have anything to do with it?