How popular is the baby name Amit in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Amit and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Amit.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Amit

Number of Babies Named Amit

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Amit

Name Quotes #62: Alice, Donna, Shachar

Ready for another batch of name-related quotes gathered from all over the place?

Let’s start with Liberian midwife Alice Sumo:

…[S]he was both surprised and delighted when quickly babies were named after her.

“I said ‘oh wow’ because with some of them I didn’t even know that they had named the baby after me! When you go to the market everybody is called Alice of Alex or Ellis. The last time I counted it was 862 Alices but now it has increased to 1,000 plus!

“To me the name Alice is an action name. Alice people are active people, they are caring people, they are loving people. A, the first letter in the alphabet. A for action.”

From Jack Burton’s article about songwriters Harry and Albert Von Tilzer in the April 9, 1949, issue of Billboard magazine:

After a season of tanbark and tinsel, Harry caught on with a traveling repertoire company, playing juvenile roles, singing songs of his own composing, and abandoning the family name of Gumm for a more glamorous and professional moniker. He took his mother’s maiden name of Tilzer and added “Von” for a touch of class. This switch in nomenclature proved to be the keystone of a songwriting dynasty which was destined to make history in Tin Pan Alley with the turn of the century.

The family’s surname was originally Gumbinsky. The phrase “tanbark and tinsel” refers to the circus; Harry was part of a traveling circus for a time as a teenager.

From an article about names in Israel by Abigail Klein Leichman:

I figured [Forest Rain’s] parents must have been hippies or Native Americans. In mainstream American culture, it is unusual to name children after elements of nature. How many people do you know named Rainbow, Lightning, Juniper Bush, Boulder, Valley, Oak, Prairie, Wellspring, or Wave?

In Israel, such names are extremely commonplace. If Forest Rain translated her name to Ya’ara Tal, no Israeli would think it exotic in the least. The words mentioned above translate to the everyday Hebrew names Keshet, Barak, Rotem, Sela, Guy, Alon, Bar, Ma’ayan, and Gal.

Another difference is that many modern Israeli names are unisex. You often cannot tell by name alone if someone is male or female. Tal, Gal, Sharon, Noam (pleasant), Shachar (Dawn), Inbar (amber), Inbal (bell), Neta (sapling), Ori (my light), Hadar (splendor), Amit (friend), and myriad other common names are used for either gender.

From an essay in which birder Nicholas Lund contemplates naming his baby after a bird (found via Emily of Nothing Like a Name):

Eventually Liz asked me to think about why I was pushing for this, and whether a birdy name was in the best interests of our kid. Did he need to carry on my own birding legacy? She was right. My son may very well grow up to love birds—I really hope he does—but he also might not. It should be his choice and not mine. If my dad had named me after some of his hobbies, you’d be calling me Carl Yastrzemski Lund or Rapala Lure Lund, and then I’d have to live with that.

From Nelson Mandela’s 1994 autobiography Long Walk to Freedom:

Apart from life, a strong constitution, and an abiding connection to the Thembu royal house, the only thing my father bestowed upon me at birth was a name, Rolihlahla. In Xhosa, Rolihlahla literally means “pulling the branch of a tree”, but its colloquial meaning more accurately would be “troublemaker.” I do not believe that names are destiny or that my father somehow divined my future, but in later years, friends and relatives would ascribe to my birth name the many storms I have both caused and weathered.

From an Irish newspaper article about the CSO disregarding fadas in Irish baby names:

The CSO recently unveiled its Baby Names of Ireland visualisation tool recently published by the Central Statistics Office (CSO) tool allowing users to check the popularity of names officially registered in Ireland. However, it does not allow for names with the síneadh fada or other diacritical marks that denote pronunciation or meaning.

[…]

“Our language, while having a special status afforded it in the Constitution has been progressively marginalised to the fringes of bureaucracy.

“It behoves the Central Statistics Office above all other institutions to be correct in all matters it reports. This is where historians will first go to research,” [author Rossa Ó Snodaigh] said.

From an essay by Donna Vickroy about the difficulty of being named Donna in 2018:

[L]ately people ask “Vonna”? or “Dana?” or “What?” Maybe the whole language movement has taken a toll.

Still, with its solid D beginning, short O solidified by double Ns and that ubiquitous feminine A at the end, Donna is — and should continue to be — easy to understand, pronounce, spell.

And yet, the struggle is real. Donna appears to be aging out.

From an Atlas Obscura article about a disgruntled former 7-Eleven owner:

The owner, Abu Musa, named his new convenience store “6-Twelve,” a one-up of the 7-Eleven name, which references the chain’s original operating hours of 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. Musa’s store operates from 6 a.m. to 12 a.m.

For lots more name quotes, click that link.

Popular Twin Names in Israel

As a follow-up to this morning’s post on baby names in Israel:

The most popular names given to Jewish girls this past year were Noa, Shira and Maya, and Daniel, Uri, Itai, Ido and Noam for boys. The most common pairs of names given to twins were Noam [pleasantness] and Amit [companion]; Ohr [light] and Shir [song]; Hod [glory] and Hadar [splendor]; and Shira [song] and Hodaya [thanks].

Among Arabs, the most common name is Muhammed, given to 13.8% of the boys. The most common Arab twins’ names were Muhammed and Ahmed, Muhammed and Mahmoud, and Mahmoud and Ahmed.

This comes from an article that was published in late 2004, so it’s out of date. Still, I thought it was worth posting as it’s the only twin name data for Israel that I’ve ever come across.

Source: Children in Israel

Name Quotes for the Weekend #8

From Kim Gillespie of the Bay of Plenty Times:

Yes, some want unique names for their babies. Others are happy to choose traditional or family names with meaning. Either way, having labelled your kid for life, how about mums and dads concentrate on growing a human being who will stand out, make a difference and be loved for who they are, not for what they’re called.

From the American Name Society [pdf]:

“Malala” was chosen as the Personal Name of the Year. The first name of Pakistani teenager Malala Yousafzai, who was shot by the Taliban for refusing to abandon her campaign for girls’ education, is now known worldwide as a symbol for women’s rights.

The overall Name of the Year was Sandy.

From CatholicMom.com’s Meg Matenaer, who named her first son Augustine:

When our oldest son Augustine was born, there was lots of confusion on the part of people asking what his name was. Either they misheard (“Justin? What a nice name.” or “Augustus?”) or they mispronounced it, especially if they were from a different faith tradition. Many a nurse has called for Augusteen across a crowded waiting room.

And named her second son Ignatius:

In the days following his birth, I tried not to worry about how other people perceived his name. Everyone had been very polite and remarked on what a beautiful or interesting name it was. No one actually said what they might have been thinking, “Are you serious?” Filling out the birth certificate paperwork, I tried to banish thoughts of how our little guy might grow up to hate us.

From Nina Badzin, writing for TC Jewfolk:

I speak from the experience of not waiting to announce my kids’ names. Of course after the birth of our first three children, my husband and I let approximately twenty-two seconds pass before broadcasting our name choices. But with our fourth child due in a few weeks, we’ve decided to hold out until the proper ceremony (we don’t know if we’re having a boy or a girl) before telling anyone the name. Practically speaking, there’s something cool and uniquely private about forcing ourselves to rise above the fast-paced announce everything on Facebook three minutes after it happens culture.

From a Fortune article about finance guru Ramit Sethi:

Sethi says his name was originally supposed to be Amit, not Ramit. But when his parents realized that Amit Singh Sethi’s initials spelled out a profanity, they went back to the registrar and convinced him that he had erroneously dropped an “R.” “Like true immigrants, they didn’t request a name change, because that would be, like, $50,” he says.

From Elizabeth Walne of UK genealogy blog Your Local History:

Some first names can be very helpful in providing an approximate birth date for an individual if you are unsure. I once researched a family with sons Foch, Petain and Joffre – all Marshals of France during WWI, effectively ‘dating’ them to around 1914-18.

Another example with less specific dates is the girl’s name ‘Adelaide’ which became popular with Adelaide, wife of William IV (born 1792, crowned Queen Consort 1831 and died 1849) and then fell in popularity – but importantly for red herring purposes didn’t disappear completely – after the turn of the century.

From Melinda Ozongwu of This Is Africa (via A Mitchell):

These days it isn’t uncommon to meet young African parents who’ve succumbed to one naming trend or the other, naming their children after celebrities, for instance: the Blue Ivy’s and all the rest of it. It’s quite a new thing, as the form and parameters of African names have traditionally been fairly standard, unlike in the West where spellings of names change, new names get invented, names rise and fall in popularity from one year to the next and so on. Recently it seems that Africans are more likely to include popular English names as well as ‘trend’ names when naming their children. It must be quite frustrating for the older generation to see the younger generations opting out of using traditional names, especially so for those who were around during our countries’ liberation from colonialism, many of whom are proud traditionalists, and many of whom are already exhausted by the younger generation abridging and altering their culture in other ways.

From Bella Clarke of the blog Glitz and Pram:

Chose a middle name first. You might want a family name as a middle name, or have a name that you’ve always loved but don’t think it seems right as a forename. For some reason it’s a lot easier to decide on a middle name for your baby and I found that having this choice set in stone made it easier to eliminate some of my forename choices.

From Drew Magary of Deadspin:

I’m waiting for Utah parents to seize upon the W as the next replacement vowel. If you don’t think there’s a Jwcwlwnn in our future, you are dead wrong. Eventually, all American baby names will resemble some kind of old Welsh dialect.

Previously: #1, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6, #7

Name Quotes for the Weekend #4

From a Grand Forks Herald article about local baby names:

Six-month-old Camber Shaw Foss, daughter of Jared and Christine Foss of Greenbush, Minn., is named for the brand of front spindle adjustment on the go-cart and the chassis on the car her father has been racing for years.

I couldn’t track down the brand, but I did find this: Camber angles.

From William D. Lindsey of the blog Bilgrimage:

There’s also the pattern–which makes family history easier at times, since it helps identify the hidden surnames of mothers–of giving the mother’s surname as a given name to a son, something my mother did in naming my middle brother Simpson. […] This pattern can result in unfortunate combinations, however, and for that reason ought sometimes to be considered carefully. In the Braselton side of my family, there’s a Head family that ties in by marriage in the 1700s back in Maryland, which united in marriage to a Bigger family, and chose to name a son Bigger Head–a choice I would not have made myself, I reckon.

From an article about bizarre baby names in West Auckland, New Zealand:

Plunket‘s most unusual West Auckland names include Problemo, Unique, Famous, Season, Stylez, Poison, Storm, Lovely, Hurricayn, Zepha and Potato.

Problemo and Potato! Both new to me.

From a Times of India article about baby names:

More and more young parents now want a name that is unique for their child. The common names like Gaurav, Amit, Rahul, Rohit, Mohit, Aditya, Aakanksha, Neha, Aditi, Preeti and Pooja have given way to trendy names like Alisah, Prioska, Aliyah, Natalia, Rachel, Nysa, Adam, Diva, Renae, Alina, Sarah and like.

UPDATE – Just tweeted by much-loved advice columnist Sugar:

It’s Raymond Carver’s birthday today. He’d be 74 if he were still alive. He was so important to me. My son, Carver, is named for him.

“Sugar” is the nom de plume of author Cheryl Strayed.

Here are quote lists #1, #2, and #3.

Hebrew Names Lost In Translation – Dudu, Mangina, Osnot, Ramit

I recently stumbled upon a funny post on Hebrew names at the blog Zabaj. Here’s a snippet:

So my family and I love to play this game – try and come up with as many names we can think of that sound great in Hebrew but hilarious in English. Some of them just look funny as they’re written and mispronounced, others are funny simply because of how they sound.

Some of the names mentioned in the post were:

  • Osnot (pronounced Oh Snot)
  • Oded (pronounced Oh Dead)
  • Amit (pronounced Ah Meat)
  • Ramit (pronounced Raw Meat)
  • Mangina (pronounced Mahn Gee Nah)
  • Dudu (pronounced Doo-Doo)

Just imagine having to live in small-town USA with a name like Mangina. Yikes. (Sorta reminds me of that Seinfeld episode in which Jerry comes up with names that rhyme with parts of the female body…)