How popular is the baby name Andrea in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Andrea.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.


Popularity of the Baby Name Andrea


Posts that Mention the Name Andrea

The Story of Doria

The baby name name Doria has peaked in usage twice so far. The second spike happened in 1971, the year of Tropical Storm Doria (which ended up being the costliest storm of the season). But the first spike, which was more subtle, happened in 1957:

  • 1959: 29 baby girls named Doria
  • 1958: 31 baby girls named Doria
  • 1957: 37 baby girls named Doria
  • 1956: 27 baby girls named Doria
  • 1955: 24 baby girls named Doria

What’s behind the first spike?

I think it’s same thing that was behind the sudden jump in usage of the name Andrea* a year earlier:

  • 1958: 3,241 baby girls (and 65 baby boys) named Andrea
  • 1957: 3,369 baby girls (and 67 baby boys) named Andrea
  • 1956: 3,394 baby girls (and 62 baby boys) named Andrea
  • 1955: 2,764 baby girls (and 31 baby boys) named Andrea
  • 1954: 2,721 baby girls (and 26 baby boys) named Andrea

On the night of July 25-26, 1956 — exactly sixty-three years ago — the Italian ocean liner SS Andrea Doria sank just off the east coast of America.

The Andrea Doria — said to be “unsinkable” (like the Titanic) — had been known for its luxury. It featured theaters, dance floors, card-rooms, lounges, and three outdoor swimming pools (one per passenger class). Since its maiden voyage in 1953, it regularly made trips across the Atlantic.

On the final night of one such trip from Italy to New York, the Andrea Doria was sailing through thick fog 50 miles south of Nantucket. Just past 11 pm, the Doria‘s starboard side was suddenly pierced by the ice-breaking prow of a smaller passenger ship called the MS Stockholm (which had left New York at mid-day and was en route to Sweden). The collision resulted in the deaths of 51 people — 46 of them Andrea Doria passengers.

Within a few minutes of the crash, the Doria had taken on so much water that it was listing more than 20 degrees to starboard. Evacuations began and, over the course of the night, the still-seaworthy Stockholm and other nearby ships came to the rescue of the remaining passengers and crew (a total of 1,660 people).

Early the next morning, East Coast newsmen in airplanes visited the crippled Doria. They took photographs and got video footage of the ship’s final moments. (It began sinking in earnest at 9:45 am, and disappeared from view under the water at 10:09 am.)

The video footage was broadcast on TV news shows later the same day, making the sinking of the Andrea Doria one of the very first televised tragedies.

The next day, photos of the doomed Doria were on the front pages of newspapers nation-wide. A few weeks later, more Doria shots ran in a photo-essay and on the cover of Life magazine. The most famous Doria photos were the Pulitzer-winning ones taken by Harry A. Trask.

All this media exposure drew attention to the two names “Andrea” and “Doria,” which in turn gave boost to the usage of both names, which is what we saw in the data above.

The ship had been named for 16th-century Italian admiral Andrea Doria, a member of the wealthy Genoese Doria (D’Oria, De Auria) family. The family traces its lineage back to a woman named Auria.

What do you think of the name Doria? Do you like it more or less than the name Andrea?

Sources:

Image: Screenshot from A Welcome Guest in the House

*Dozens of the baby girls named Andrea during the second half of 1956 got the middle name Doria. Here’s one example from Idaho.

Popular Baby Names in Italy, 2017

According to Italy’s Istituto Nazionale di Statistica, the most popular baby names in the country in 2017 were Sofia and Francesco.

Here are Italy’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Sofia, 7,173 baby girls
2. Giulia, 6,143
3. Aurora, 5,808
4. Alice, 3,691
5. Ginevra, 3,564
6. Emma, 3,525
7. Giorgia, 3,474
8. Greta, 3,270
9. Martina, 3,129
10. Beatrice, 2,970

Boy Names
1. Francesco, 7,209 baby boys
2. Leonardo, 6,622
3. Alessandro, 5,987
4. Lorenzo, 5,789
5. Mattia, 5,715
6. Andrea, 5,322
7. Gabriele, 5,129
8. Riccardo, 4,336
9. Matteo, 4,072
10. Tommaso, 4,020

In the girls’ top 10, Beatrice replaces Chiara (now 12th). Also notable is the fact that the top 10 again includes a total of four g-names. (In the U.S., on the other hand, there are only four g-names — Grace, Genesis, Gabriella, and Gianna — in the entire top 100.)

On the boys’ side, further down, Kevin is hanging on at #50.

Source: How many babies are named…? (Istat)

Popular Baby Names in Italy, 2016

According to Italy’s Istituto nazionale di statistica (Istat), the most popular baby names in the country in 2016 were Sofia and Francesco.

Here are Italy’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Sofia, 7,616 baby girls
2. Aurora, 6,466
3. Giulia, 6,093
4. Emma, 3,814
5. Giorgia, 3,651
6. Martina, 3,533
7. Alice, 3,506
8. Greta, 3,461
9. Ginevra, 3,256
10. Chiara, 3,188

Boy Names
1. Francesco, 7,850 baby boys
2. Alessandro, 6,664
3. Leonardo, 6,505
4. Lorenzo, 6,331
5. Mattia, 5,917
6. Andrea, 5,577
7. Gabriele, 5,254
8. Matteo, 4,526
9. Tommaso, 4,179
10. Riccardo, 4,087

In the girls’ top 10, Ginevra replaces Anna (now 11th).

There were no replacements in the boys’ top 10.

Some of the names from within the top 50 were…

  • Girl names: Elisa (25th), Gioia (33rd), Asia (35th), Benedetta (46th)
  • Boy names: Edoardo (11th), Salvatore (31st), Enea (44th), Kevin (50th)

The top two names were the same in 2015.

Source: How many babies are named…? (Istat)

Name Quotes #54: Roella, Rumi, Tsh

splash, movie, quote, quotation, madison, 1980s

From the 1984 movie Splash, the character Allen (Tom Hanks) talking with his then-nameless lady friend (Daryl Hannah) as they walk around NYC:

Woman: “What are English names?”

Allen: “Well, there’s millions of them, I guess. Jennifer, Joanie, Hilary. (Careful, hey, those are hot!) See names, names… Linda, Kim– (Where are we? Madison.) Uh, Elizabeth, Samantha–”

Woman: “Madison…I like Madison!”

Allen: “Madison’s not a name… Well, all right, ok, Madison it is. Good thing we weren’t at 149th Street.”

Jay-Z on the names of his twins, Rumi and Sir, from a recent Rap Radar interview (via People):

“Rumi is our favorite poet, so it was for our daughter,” he shared. “Sir was like, man, come out the gate. He carries himself like that. He just came out, like, Sir.”

From a 2016 interview with Cheap Trick’s Robin Zander in the Tampa Bay Times:

In the early ’90s, he and wife, Pam, who grew up in Pinellas County, settled down in the Sunshine State, drawn by family ties and the promise of a nice, safe community in which to raise their son, Robin Taylor, now 23, and daughter, Robin-Sailor, 15. (Zander’s go-to line about his kids’ quirky names: “My wife just calls us Robin, and we all come running.”)

From a 2009 review of the book Looking In, about photographer Robert Frank:

On November 7 1955, part-way through a two-year, Guggenheim-funded voyage around America, the photographer Robert Frank was arrested by Arkansas state police who suspected he was a communist. Their reasons: he was a shabbily dressed foreigner, he was Jewish, he had letters of reference from people with Russian-sounding names, he had photographed the Ford plant, possessed foreign whisky and his children had foreign names (Pablo and Andrea).

From an article called This Is The Biggest Influence On Baby Names:

[Neil] Burdess says most parents’ baby-name decisions are shaped by affluent, highly educated families who live near them, rather than prominent figures in pop culture.

[…]

He cites research conducted in California in the 1960s, which found that names adopted by high-income, highly educated parents are soon embraced by those lower down the socioeconomic ladder.

From a 2015 obituary of movie star Rex Reason:

Contrary to what one might think, Rex Reason was his birth name, not one dreamed up by a Hollywood executive. Universal Pictures, in fact, had billed him as “Bart Roberts” in a couple of films before he insisted on being credited with his real name.

From a 1998 obituary of surfer Rell Sunn:

There seemed to be a bit of destiny attached. Her middle name, Ka-polioka’ehukai, means Heart of the Sea.

“Most Hawaiian grandparents name you before you’re born,” she says. “They have a dream or something that tells them what the name will be.” Hawaiians also have a knack for giving people rhythmic, dead-on nicknames, and for young Rell they had a beauty: Rella Propella.

“My godmother called me that because I was always moving so fast,” says Rell. “To this day, people think my real name is Rella. Actually I was born Roella, a combination of my parents’ names: Roen and Elbert. But I hated it, and no one used it, so I changed it to Rell.”

From a blog post by Jason Fisher on naming practices in Nigeria:

When [Kelechi Eke] was born, his mother experienced dangerous complications, which his parents acknowledged in his naming. In Igbo, Kelechi means “thank God”, and Eke means “creation”. The usual Igbo name for God, Chineke, means literally, “God of Creation”, and you can see both elements (chi + eke) in his two names. When K.C.’s own son was born, it was in the wake of difficulties in bringing his wife to the United States; consequently, they chose the name Oluchi, meaning “God’s work”, suggesting their gratitude that the immigration problems were resolved before his mother went into labor.

From the about page of writer Tsh Oxenreider:

My name is Tsh Oxenreider, and no, my name is not a typo (one of the first things people ask). It’s pronounced “Tish.” No reason, really, except that my parents were experimental with their names choices in the 70s. Until my younger brother was born in the 80s, whom they named Josh, quite possibly one of the most common names for people his age. Who knows what they were thinking, really.

Want to see more quotes about names? Check out the name quotes category.

Popular Baby Names in Moldova, 2016

According to an article published in late January by Moldovan news site Publika TV, the most popular baby names in Moldova in 2016 were Sofia and David.

The article was hard to interpret, but here’s my guess at Moldova’s top girl names and top boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Sofia
2. Anastasia
3. Daria
4. Victoria
5. Alexandra
6. Evelina
7. Amelia
8. Andrea
9. Valeria
10. Gabriela

Boy Names
1. David
2. Maxim
3. Alexandru
4. Artiom (…which is based on the name of Greek goddess Artemis)
5. Ion (…looks molecular, but it’s actually a form of John)
6. Bogdan
7. Daniel
8. Matthew
9. Nikita
10. Michael

The top names in 2014 were Sofia and Maxim.

Source: Most popular baby names chosen by Moldovans in 2016