How popular is the baby name Aspen in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Aspen and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Aspen.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.


Popularity of the Baby Name Aspen

Number of Babies Named Aspen

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Aspen

Top 50 Nature Names for Baby Girls

Nature is waking up again! Let’s celebrate by checking out which nature names are the most popular for baby girls right now. Ironically the top 50 list below includes all the seasons except for “Spring,” but it does feature lots of springtime things: flowers, birds, trees…

nature names, girl names, top 50, baby names,

For this list I stuck to names that are also correctly spelled English words. This means that I skipped names that are non-English words (like Stella and Luna) and alternative spellings of words (like Brooke and Briar). I should also mention that several of the above (including Rowan, Robin, and Clementine) do have more than one etymology to choose from.

Here are links to the popularity graphs:

1-10 11-20 21-30 31-40 41-50
Lily
Violet
Hazel
Autumn
Ruby
Willow
Jasmine
Jade
Ivy
Rose
Daisy
Summer
Iris
Olive
Rowan
Amber
River
Ember
Aspen
Sage
Magnolia
Meadow
Wren
Ivory
Laurel
Sky
Clementine
Dahlia
Juniper
Raven
Holly
Savanna
Rosemary
Winter
Crystal
Azalea
Pearl
Jewel
Heather
Robin
Diamond
Poppy
Opal
Sunny
Coral
Emerald
Clover
Pepper
Sapphire
Amethyst

Which nature name(s) do you like best?

P.S. Nature names that didn’t quite make the top 50 included Stormy, Zinnia, Sandy, and Acacia.


Distinctive Baby Names, State by State

Which baby names are the most disproportionately popular in each U.S. state?

Name blog Republic of Names has your answer — a bunch of cool lists of the most distinctive baby names by state. Here are some highlights for about half of the states.

In Alabama:

  • Crimson – Crimson Tide is the University of Alabama football team.
  • Krimson

In Alaska:

  • Aurora
  • Denali – Denali (Mount McKinley) in Alaska is North America’s highest peak.
  • McKinley

In Arizona:

  • Ariza
  • Helios
  • Nizhoni – Nizhóní is a Navajo word meaning “it/he/she is pretty/beautiful.”
  • Sedona – Sedona is a city in Arizona.

In California:

  • Eztli – Eztli is a Nahuatl (Aztec) word meaning “blood.”
  • Sissi

In Colorado:

  • Matix
  • Story
  • Trindon – Trindon Holliday played pro football in Colorado.
  • Zeppelin

In Florida:

  • Kervens
  • Woodley

In Idaho:

  • Ammon
  • Brigham
  • Hyrum

In Indiana:

  • Jolisa

In Iowa:

  • Kinnick – Kinnick Stadium is where the Iowa Hawkeyes football team plays.

In Kansas:

  • Creighton
  • Ignatius

In Louisiana:

  • Beaux
  • Jacques
  • Marigny – Foubourg Marigny is a New Orleans neighborhood.
  • Montreal

In Maine:

  • Baxter – Baxter is a state park in Maine.
  • Libby

In Mississippi:

  • Swayze

In Missouri:

  • Chancellor
  • Messiah

In Montana:

  • Tuff

In Nevada:

  • Berenice
  • Halo
  • Love

In North Carolina:

  • Chatham

In North Dakota:

  • Briggs
  • McCoy

In Oklahoma:

  • Gentry
  • Jentri
  • Jentry
  • Kutter
  • Tuck
  • Tuff

In Oregon:

  • Alder
  • Autzen – Autzen Stadium is where the Oregon Ducks football team plays.
  • Avenir – Avenir is a French word meaning “future.” It’s also on the Washington state list below. In fact, nearly two-thirds of last year’s Avenirs were born on the west coast: 10 in Washington, 7 in California, 5 in Oregon. Anyone know why?
  • Cedar
  • Forest
  • Maple
  • Opal
  • Pepper
  • Sequoia
  • Sol

In Tennessee:

In Texas:

  • Brazos – Brazos is a Spanish word meaning “arms.” The Brazos River in Texas was originally called Rio de los Brazos de Dios, or “River of the Arms of God.”

In Utah:

  • Korver – Kyle Korver played pro basketball in Utah.
  • Lesieli
  • Navy
  • Parley
  • Viliami

In Vermont:

  • Arlo
  • Juniper

In Washington, D.C.:

  • Egypt
  • Harlem

In Washington (state):

  • Avenir – see Oregon
  • Rio
  • Valkyrie
  • Zephyr

In West Virginia:

  • Remington

In Wisconsin:

  • Charisma
  • Croix
  • Ruthann

In Wyoming:

  • Temperance

See the original post for the rest. You might also be interested in checking out the “most regional” baby names in the US.

Baby Name Needed – Boy Name for Brother of Channing and Deacon

A reader named Heath is expecting his third child, a boy, and would like some name suggestions. Here’s what he says:

I’m Heath, wife is Aspen, daughter is Channing and son is Deacon so we’re looking for a name that most kids won’t have but also want something that isn’t feminine, will get him picked on or doesn’t sound like we are trying too hard.

Here are some of the names they’ve been considering:

My favorite is Justice but that has no chance with my wife. She likes Ridge but I quickly vetoed that. Her favorite is Easton but I was looking for something more. Some others that we have thought about is Beckett, Kingston or Tate but again I’m not overly thrilled.

Many of the names above come from surnames, so that’s what I focused on as I brainstormed:

Baron
Bridger
Brogan
Corbin
Dax
Edison
Evander
Ezra
Felix
Finn
Fletcher
Franklin
Fulton
Garrison
Graham
Griffin
Grover
Hawthorn
Jasper
Lachlan
Lawson
Lennon
Marlow
Maxwell
Nash
Nigel
Owen
Paxton
Pierce
Quincy
Ramsey
Roscoe
Royce
Sawyer
Stone
Thaddeus
Thatcher
Tavish
Tobias
Trent
Vaughn
Walker
Winston
Zane

Which of the above do you like best with Channing and Deacon? What other names would you suggest to Heath?

Baby Name Needed – Boy or Girl Name for Aspen’s Sibling

A reader named Kendra, who has a daughter named Aspen, is now expecting a second baby (gender unknown). She’d like the baby’s first name to:

  • Be “different yet familiar”
  • Be easy to spell
  • Start with something other than A, K or M
  • End with something other than A or N

She’d like the middle name to start with J. Current favorites for the middle spot are Jacob, Johnmichael (a family name), Jenai and Jane.

For first names, I think occupational and locational names would be a good place to start:

Bailey
Carter
Chase
Cooper
Finley
Fisher
Fletcher
Harper
Hunter
Marley
Parker
Piper
Presley
Ridley
Ripley
Roscoe
Ryder
Sawyer
Slater
Tanner
Tatum
Taylor
Tucker
Turner
Thatcher
Tyler
Wesley

They are rooted in the physical (as Aspen is), but they won’t lock Kendra into noun-names (as names like Sage or Willow would). Most are also theoretically gender-neutral — again, like Aspen — though in real life they tend to be used for either one gender or the other.

These names also came to mind:

  • Bryce, Cody, Cole, Max, Rory, Royce, Ryker, and Ulysses for boys,
  • Carley, Chloe, Daphne, and Heidi for girls, and
  • Cassidy and Emery for either boys or girls.

(Daphne does refer to another kind of tree, but the connection is subtle, so I think it would be all right with Aspen.)

It’s tricky to suggest middle names without a definitive first name in place. I do really like Johnmichael and Jane, though. I also thought Kendra might find Jonah, Jett or Jude appealing, as they became fashionable (as first names) right around the same time Aspen did.

Do you like any of the above names? What others would you suggest?

Update – The baby is here! Scroll down to see what name Kendra chose.

Baby Name Needed – Botanical Name for Baby Boy

A reader named Daniel recently e-mailed me. He and his wife are expecting a baby boy in several weeks and they’re looking for a botanical name for their son.

Botanical boy names can be hard to track down, but they’re definitely out there. For instance, tree names that can be used as boy names include Aspen, Cedar, Linden, Rowan and Willow. Herb names that work for baby boys include Basil, Burnet, Sage, Thyme and Valerian.

Several of the names above also happen to be traditional names with separate (non-botanical) origins. Rowan comes from the Gaelic word for “red,” Basil from the Greek word for “king,” and Valerian from the Latin verb “to be strong.” The word sage can also mean “wise” (adj.) or “wise man” (n.).

Forest, Kale, Reed and Rush are other possibilities from the plant kingdom. And, if one wants to be a bit more daring, there’s always Hawthorn, Orris or Huckleberry.

Finally, male names with botanical definitions include Alon/Elon, Ashton/Nash/Tash, Ogden, Silvio/Sylvester and Vernon.

Do you guys have any other ideas?

Update: The baby has a name! Scroll down to find out what it is…