How popular is the baby name Attila in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Attila.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Attila


Posts that Mention the Name Attila

Name Quotes 78: Brene, Neal, SanDeE*

The name SanDeE* from LA Story (1991).
SanDeE* from LA Story

From the 1991 movie LA Story, a conversation between Harris (played by Steve Martin) and SanDeE* (played by Sarah Jessica Parker):

H: What was your name again?

S: SanDeE*

H: I’m sorry, Sandy, Sandy… It’s a nice name. Everybody has such weird names now, it’s like Tiffany with a P-H-I, and instead of Nancy it’s Nancine. [He begins to write her name down.]

S: Big S, small A, small N, big D, small E, big E.

H: What?

S: Big S, small A, small N, big D, small E, big E. [She grabs his hand and writes directly on it.] Big S, small A, small N, big D, small E, big E. Then there’s a little star at the end.

Anna Wintour recently talking about her new puppy, named Finch [vid]:

She’s called Finch because we call all of our dogs after characters in To Kill a Mockingbird. So we have had a Scout, a Radley, and a Harper. And let me tell you, they are not happy about Finch’s arrival.

From a 1995 interview with R.E.M. vocalist Michael Stipe, whose paternal grandfather was a Methodist minister:

Well, Methodism was started by John Wesley, who was, in his way, a really radical guy who believed in a lot of individual responsibility. It’s not the kind of religion that’s right around your throat. Actually, I was named after him, John Michael Stipe.

From an article about Lara Prescott, author of the new book The Secrets We Kept, a fictional account of the dangers of publishing Doctor Zhivago in the 1950s:

You could say she was born to write this historical novel: Prescott’s mother named her after the doomed heroine from her favorite movie, the 1965 adaptation of Boris Pasternak’s epic.

A non-edited tweet from Cardi B, whose sister’s name is Hennessy:

Fun fact :Always wanted a daughter and I always used to say imma name her HennyLynn. It’s a cute mix of my sisters name but then I started calling my sister HennyLynn then it became one of the nicknames I gave my sister so it woulda been weird naming my daughter that .

From an article about a Georgia man whose name, Neal, came from a POW bracelet:

His father, the late John Carpenter, was an aircraft mechanic in the Navy and was deployed overseas at the time. He arrived home in time for his son’s birth. When it became necessary to scramble and find a boy’s name, John Carpenter looked down at the POW/MIA bracelet he was wearing.

The engraved name was Neal Clinton Ward Jr. He had been listed as Missing in Action since June 13, 1969. An airman, his plane had been shot down over Laos in the jungles of Southeast Asia, nine days before his 24th birthday.

The Carpenters named their son Neal Ward Carpenter.

(Neal’s mom had been convinced the baby would be a girl. Neal said: “I was going to be April Michelle, and that’s all there was to it.”)

Research professor and author Brené Brown on her unique name:

Growing up, every time we drove from San Antonio to Houston, going to Stuckey’s — all these places where you buy monogrammed shirts and glasses — I was so put out because there was never a “Brené.” So I think I made up in my head that it was French. And then I hitchhiked across Europe after high school and I got to France and I was like, “Je suis Brené!” And they were like, “What kind of name is that?” They’d never heard of it. My parents just made it up. I had a whole narrative in high school — “When I bust out of this suburban Spring, Texas, high school I’m going to go back to France where my people are!” But, no, it’s not French — it’s south side San Antonio.

Marketing expert Seth Godin’s take on the best middle name ever:

It’s not Warren or Susan or Otis or Samuel or Tricia.

It’s “The.”

As in Attila The Hun or Alexander The Great or Zorba The Greek.

When your middle name is ‘The’, it means you’re it. The only one. The one that defines the category. I think that focus is a choice, and that the result of appropriate focus is you earn the middle name.

For more name-related quotes, check out the name quotes category.

Popular Baby Names in Hungary, 2016

According to data from the Hungary’s Ministry of the Interior (Belügyminisztérium), the most popular baby names in Hungary in 2016 were Hanna and Bence.

Here are Hungary’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Hanna, 1,669 baby girls
2. Anna, 1,206
3. Jázmin, 866
4. Zsófia, 856
5. Zoé, 833
6. Lili, 764
7. Boglárka, 762 – Boglárka is Hungarian for “buttercup.”
8. Luca, 760
9. Emma, 742
10. Léna, 697

Boy Names
1. Bence, 1,800 baby boys – Bence is a form of Vincent.
2. Máté, 1,321
3. Levente, 1,280 – Levente might be based on the Hungarian verb lesz, meaning “will be.”
4. Dominik, 1,173
5. Marcell, 1,146
6. Dávid, 1,123
7. Ádám, 1,117
8. Noel, 1,071
9. Dániel, 1,054
10. Milán, 1,037

In the girls’ top 10, Léna replaces Nóra. In the boys’ top 10, Noel replaces Áron. (Interestingly, the two “replaced” names — if we ignore diacritical marks — are anagrams of one another. They’re palindromic, in fact.)

And how is the name Attila faring in Hungary these days? Here’s the data for the last few years:

  • 2016: Attila ranked 27th (569 baby boys)
  • 2015: Attila ranked 25th (568 baby boys)
  • 2014: Attila ranked 26th (560 baby boys)
  • 2013: Attila ranked 26th (552 baby boys)

Source: Statistics – Hungary’s Deputy State Secretariat for the Administration of the Ministry of the Interior (via Maybe It Is Daijiro)

Babies Named for Attila the Hun?

attila, movieIn Hungary, Attila was a top-20 baby name until just recently. In the U.S., on the other hand, Attila has never been very popular. It only started appearing in the data in the late 1950s:

  • 1961: 11 baby boys named Attila
  • 1960: 14 baby boys named Attila
  • 1959: 14 baby boys named Attila
  • 1958: 10 baby boys named Attila [debut]
  • 1957: unlisted

Why? Because of the 1954 movie Attila the Hun, which starred Anthony Quinn as Attila, the aggressive 5th-century ruler of the Huns.

I know what you’re thinking: How did a movie from 1954 cause a 1958 debut?

Well, the movie was an Italian production, so it was first released in Italy. The next year it came out in Portugal, West Germany, Austria, Denmark, Belgium, and France. In 1956, it was released in Spain, Sweden, and Japan. In 1957, it came out in Norway and Finland. Finally, in the middle of 1958, the movie reached the United States.

Attila the Hun may be a world-famous historical figure, but unfortunately no one knows what his name means. One theory is that Attila was derived from the Gothic word atta, meaning “father.” Another is that is has Turkic roots and means “the oceanic, universal [ruler].”

But here are some things we do know: Attila’s name morphed into “Etzel” in the medieval German epic poem Nibelungenlied. A variant of Etzel, Edsel, was the first name of Henry Ford’s childhood best friend Edsel Ruddiman. Later, it also became the name of his only son, Edsel Ford (1893-1943). And Edsel Ford’s first name ended up on the famously unsuccessful line of cars launched by Ford in the late ’50s — around the same time Attila popped up on the baby name charts, ironically.

Which name do you like better, Attila or Edsel?

Sources: Attila – IMDb, Attila – Wikipedia

Kilcher Names – Atz, Farenorth, Jewel, Q’orianka

I don’t normally watch television, but I’m visiting my Dad right now and he’s got his TV on all the time, so I haven’t been able to help it lately. :)

Yule Farenorth Kilcher
Yule Farenorth Kilcher
The other day I was walking past the TV set and heard the word ‘Alaska’ — a place I’ve long wanted to visit. So I stopped to see what was on. Soon I was hearing names like Atz, Atz Lee and Otto.

Who were these people? Where did they get such interesting names?

Turns out it was a reality show called Alaska: The Last Frontier, and the cast members were part of the locally famous Kilcher family.

Atz and Otto are the sons of homesteaders Yule Farenorth Kilcher (b. 1913) and Ruth Kilcher (b. 1920). Yule and Ruth left Switzerland for Alaska in the early 1940s. Yule went on to serve in the Alaska State Senate during the 1960s.

Yule wasn’t born “Yule Farenorth.” He was originally Julius Jakob [YOO-lee-us YAH-kob] but he changed his first and middle names after immigrating.

Yule and Ruth had a total of eight children — two boys and six girls. Here are the names:

  1. Mairiis
  2. Wurtila Dora (Wurzy)
  3. Linda Fay
  4. Attila Kuno (Atz)
  5. Sunrise Diana Irene
  6. Edwin Otto
  7. Stella Vera Septina (Bonnie)
  8. Catkin Melody

Many of the above also gave their own children distinctive names, such as Cornelius, Davin, Ecaterina, Gawan, Olga and Saskia.

One of Atz’s children is pop singer Jewel Kilcher, a.k.a. Jewel. Her popularity in the mid-1990s helped push the baby name Jewel back into the U.S. top 1,000 in 1997:

  • 1999: 453 baby girls named Jewel [ranked 557th]
  • 1998: 490 baby girls named Jewel [ranked 516th]
  • 1997: 330 baby girls named Jewel [ranked 665th]
  • 1996: 168 baby girls named Jewel [ranked 1,098th]
  • 1995: 154 baby girls named Jewel [ranked 1,141st]

And, moving forward another generation, one of Wurzy’s grandchildren is actress Q’orianka Kilcher, whose appearance in the movie The New World (2005) made Qorianka a one-hit wonder on the baby name charts in 2006.

(Q’orianka told the press that her name means “golden eagle” in Quechua, and it does seem to be based on the Quechua words for “gold,” quri, and “eagle,” anca, but I’m not sure whether it’s a legit Quechua name or a modern invention.)

So do any of you guys watch Alaska: The Last Frontier regularly? Have I missed any other good Kilcher names?

Popular and Unique Baby Names in Quebec in 2009

The most popular baby names in the Canadian province of Quebec in 2009 were:

Boys Girls
William
Olivier
Thomas
Nathan
Alexis
Felix
Gabriel
Samuel
Antoine
Xavier
Léa
Florence
Emma
Rosalie
Jade
Juliette
Camille
Gabrielle
Maika
Mia

Now that that’s out of the way, it’s time for the fun stuff. Here are some of the baby names that were bestowed only once in Quebec last year. (I didn’t see another Kierkegaard, but I did spot a Rousseau!)

  • Attila Norbert (boy) – Part ferocious, part dorky. Love the contrast.
  • Aztlan (boy) – Legendary homeland of the Nahua (Aztecs).
  • Bienheureux (boy) – French for “very happy” or “blessed.”
  • Billary (girl) – Bill + Hilary? Could it be some sort of tribute?
  • Carnegie Ursula (girl) – Interesting.
  • Fraidy (girl) – I was actually having a conversation about about cats when I noticed this one.
  • Galadrielle (girl) – Galadriel with a French twist. (Not the hairdo, of course. That would look completely out of place in Middle-earth.)
  • God-Day (boy) – Reminds me of God’s Power from a few weeks ago.
  • Greace (girl) and Alizee Greace (girl) – Is Greace supposed to be Grace? It looks more like Grease, which is gross.
  • Great-Rousseau (girl) – I love these philosopher names. Wonder who’ll pop up next year. Descartes? Spinoza?
  • Harvest (girl) – Call me crazy, but I like it. Nice associations, and Harvie makes a cute nickname.
  • Heavenly-Trinity (girl) – Either one or the other, I’d say. The combination is a bit much.
  • Jeanne-Bosco (girl) – Surely inspired by St. John Bosco.
  • Kinda Ahmed (girl) – Not definitely Ahmed, but kinda Ahmed.
  • Klervi (girl) – It looks made-up, but it’s legit. Comes from the name of an obscure saint.
  • Limerick (boy) – Lemme guess…an older sister named Sestina?
  • Nervastone (boy) – “Forget flagstone–try Nervastone!”
  • Precious-Angel (girl) – See Heavenly-Trinity.
  • Rafter (boy) – Do they hope he’ll swing from one when he’s older?
  • Ratzy (girl) – Well, much of January ’09 was part of the Year of the Rat. Maybe that’s where this comes from.
  • Rose-Desneiges (girl) – Des neiges is French for “of the snows.”
  • Schneider-Himrick (boy) – Sounds like a tool company.
  • Shadey (girl) – The government of Quebec complains about a superfluous diacritic, but doesn’t mind that a newborn has been dubbed “Shadey”? Hm.
  • Syntyche (girl) – Means “with fate” in ancient Greek.
  • Tayden (boy) – First time I’ve seen this particular -ayden.
  • Turquoise Gold (girl) – School colors, maybe?
  • Wilberlyne (girl) – Kind of a cute way to feminize Wilber.

Have you had a chance to look through the list? If so, did you notice any interesting names?

Source: Régie des rentes Québec