How popular is the baby name Bandit in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Bandit and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Bandit.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Bandit

Number of Babies Named Bandit

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Bandit

Popular Baby Names in Alberta, 2014

According to data from Service Alberta, the most popular baby names in Alberta in 2014 were (again) Olivia and Liam.

Here are Alberta’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2014:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Olivia
2. Emma
3. Emily
4. Sophia
5. Ava
6. Isabella
7. Abigail
8. Ella
9. Charlotte
10. Hannah
1. Liam
2. Ethan
3. Benjamin
4. William
5. Logan
6. Noah
7. Jacob
8. Oliver
9. Lucas
10. Carter

In the girls’ top 10, Isabella, Ella, and Hannah replace Avery, Chloe and Lily.

In the boys’ top 10, Oliver replaces Mason, and Lucas drops from 2nd to 9th.

A total of “6,110 distinct boy names and 7,409 distinct girl names” were registered last year. Here are some of the more unusual picks:

Unusual Girl Names Unusual Boy Names
Aafreen, Acadia, Adefolarin, Alimothy, Aluex, Anemone, Angelbert, Athens-Ava, Azhettea, Bandit, Baybee, Borbala, Brisbane, Caylex, Ceroxity, Cersei, Clairity, Cleony, Cyzarine, Daydence, Dazzlin, Ddendyll, Denali, Dibdrisht, Eiffel, Elisapea, Ellyndriel, Ethiopia, Felizity, Finfinne, Gai-Inn, Gnouma, Hattie-Kay, Izna, Iztlixochitl, Jeinezt, Jimiefer, Kestrel, Koblenz, Leiralita, Louange, Maghfira, Maisley, Marshall-Heigl, Melon, Mentallah, Mintge, Morning-Star, Nof, Nomingoo, Phahannah, Qiersteine, Raineeville, Rhadio, Rteel, Schneidine, Selvaria, Serastella, Sixx, Syaffa, Talimia, Thumbelina-Jane, Vando-Vandu, Vermond, Vhia, Via-star, Vimbai, Vinoruveze, Wahpan-ah-chak, Zethandra Alecvander, Agbomk, Arcadian, Arkham, Bellicose, Border, Beowulf, Brenor, Bronxdyn, Cadillac, Clarenziel, Clarksicnarf*, Clench, Cobain, Colt-Wesson, Confucius, Dazareth, Dokter, Drew-Donnelly-Donald, Drizelle, Erbenstan, Eulliejhay, Evanescence, Fteen, Gavisht, Gibson-Rush, Helix, Jaffredson, Kakwa, Kgotso, K’i, KiiyosaahKomapii, Kreydd, Macxinier, Madiba, Markonal, Mavallus, MC-Jerry, McYusef, NorthernSky, Ollivander, Pitch, Qambarali, Quark, Reech, Ricarlisle, Ringo, Seanex**, Shaddix, Soloolo, Spur, Strife, Tenor, Tesla, Thaxter, Theologis, Thrain, Thunderboy, Uel, Uzuvira, Vangelis, Venzuela, Whizkie-Czar, WindyBoy, Xeighdrey, Xyber, Zabartor, Zabit, Zarillious, Zegee

*Clarksicnarf is the combination of Clark (forwards) and Francis (backwards).
**Seanex is very close to Seanix.

Here are Alberta’s top names from 2013, 2012, 2011, 2009, 2008, 2007 and 2006.

Sources: Alberta’s Top Babies Names – Service Alberta, Liam and Olivia top baby names for 2014


43 Unique Noun-Names

I’m fascinated by personal names that, out of context, don’t appear to be names at all. Especially when said names are created from everyday nouns and proper nouns — places, foods, animals, objects, brands, ideas, events, institutions, organizations, qualities, phenomena, and so forth.

My fascination kicked into high gear after I wrote about noun-names earlier this year. Ever since, I’ve kept my eyes peeled for noun-names.

So far, I’ve collected hundreds. But it’s going to take me a while to blog about all of them. In the meanwhile, I thought I’d list some of the strangest ones I’ve already talked about:

  1. Bandit
  2. Cape Cod
  3. Captivity
  4. Celerie (celery)
  5. Danger
  6. Eclipse
  7. Emancipation Proclamation
  8. Emirates
  9. Eiffel Tower
  10. Facebook
  11. Fourth
  12. Freeway
  13. Funeral
  14. Golden Palace
  15. Halloween
  16. Helsinki
  17. Jeep
  18. Joker
  19. Key West
  20. Knuckles
  21. Legal Tender
  22. Metallica
  23. Oleomargarine
  24. Opera House
  25. Orbit
  26. Peaches
  27. Pebbles
  28. Peppermint
  29. Prohibition
  30. Rainbow
  31. Shotgun
  32. Skylab
  33. Soccer City
  34. Sou’Wester
  35. Strawberry
  36. Suffrage
  37. Tahiti
  38. Trooper
  39. Tsunami
  40. Union Jack
  41. Vick Vaporup (Vicks VapoRub)
  42. Wilmot Proviso
  43. Zeppelin

Did I skip any good ones? Let me know in the comments!

*

Later additions…

  1. Sputnik, 10/4
  2. Nintendo, 10/22
  3. Annexation, 10/25
  4. Windchime, 11/9
  5. Oregon Territory, 11/22
  6. Gold Dust, 11/29

Can Wiki Be a Girl Name?

This question has been bringing traffic to my blog lately. People seem to be interested in using the Hawaiian word wiki, which means “quick,” as a baby girl name.

Can they use wiki as a girl name? Well, sure they can. If they live in a place that doesn’t have strict laws about baby names. In the U.S., for instance, they can name their baby girl Audrey, Abcde, Brenda, Bandit, Charity, Cheesette, or just about anything else they want.

Should they use it as a girl name, though? Should wiki be used as a baby name at all? I think these questions are a bit more thought-provoking. Let’s try a poll:

Should wiki be used as a baby name?

View Results

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Are Babies Getting Dog Names?

My father grew up in the 1950s. When he was young, his family had three dogs: King, Jett and Baron.

A few weeks ago, the SSA announced the top baby names of 2009. It also published a nifty change in popularity page.

What two names were prominently featured on that page? King and Jett. They’d increased in popularity significantly from 2008 to 2009. (Baron didn’t make the list, but it did crack the top 1,000 for the first time in 2008.)

We already know that human names are being given to dogs. But the trendiness of King and Jett makes me wonder: are all those old dog names destined to be reincarnated as baby names?

Snowflake and Spot may not make the jump, but Ace, Bandit, Petal, Princess and Spike have been popping up on birth certificates lately. And I could see how other old-school dog names like Duchess, Shadow and Lucky might appeal to certain parents.

What do you think about dog names for babies — Fun? Crazy? Inevitable?

Red Stilettos, Brown Loafers and Baby Names

Many people want unique names for their babies. They believe unique names will help their children stand out. And they’re right–unique names do indeed attract attention. But is it the kind of attention parents should want for their kids?

Let’s try an analogy. A unique name is a pair of red stilettos. A common name is a pair of brown loafers. The stilettos are conspicuous and memorable; the loafers are plain and forgettable.

The big drawback to red stilettos? (Besides knee pain, back pain, sprained ankles, hammer toes, corns and calluses?) They’re a distraction.

The big benefit to brown loafers? They aren’t distracting at all. They make it easy for the wearer attract attention to herself, which is the way things ought to be. A person shouldn’t have to compete with her name (or her shoes!) for attention.

People named Marijuana, Renesmee, Bandit and Zealand-New are forced to walk around in red stilettos their entire lives. People named Isabella, Olivia, Chloe and Sophie, on the other hand, get to wear comfy loafers.

(Holds true for boy names as well–I just thought it would be strange to throw a bunch of boy names into a post about red stilettos.)