How popular is the baby name Beth in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Beth.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Beth


Posts that Mention the Name Beth

Name Quotes for the Weekend #9

From a Chicago Parent article about name pronunciation:

Here’s the story behind my daughter’s name – the name no one can pronounce: When it came to naming our daughter, her father insisted on naming her Amalasunta, after the ancient Queen of the Visigoths. “No, nope, that won’t work,” I said, standing firm, “No one will ever be able to pronounce that!” And so we settled on Chiara. It means light and fair; the perfect name for our little blonde-haired, blue-eyed daughter.

Well, as it turns out, no one seems to be able to pronounce that, either.

From a Clutch article about things non-black people should know about black women:

Look, all Black folk don’t have multi-hypenate names. We have Janes, Marys and Beths too. And somehow our single syllabic sisters learn how to pronounce names like La’Taquisha, Marquaysa, Taiwanas, etc. You know what our secret is? Lean closer.

WE ASK.

I’m a four syllable girl with an uncommon name (in the States.) I know it’s a challenge to pronounce and I am never offended by anyone asking, “how do I pronounce your name?” However, I am offended when you, a stranger, butchers it without care or tries to nickname me like we’re friends. Take the time to learn my name and maybe, I’ll offer my nickname to help you out.

From a Kashmir Life article about baby naming practices:

While some Muslims follow the astrological concept adopted by Sharif and Khan, others rubbish the concept as superstitious and faulty. Fatima Wani, a 66 year old woman says, “I was named Fatima by my father following two of my elder sisters with the same name who died soon after their birth. But my father rubbished any superstitious belief of a doomed name and preferred to give me the same name, Fatima, as of my two late sisters. And look, I am alive and talking to you now.”

From a Deadline Hollywood article about Quvenshané Wallis:

In a way, however, both of Quvenzhané’s parents are with her every time someone speaks her unusual first name (pronounced Kwe-VAWN-zhan-ay). The first part combines elements of her teacher mother’s first name, Qulyndreia, and her truck driver father’s first name, Venjie. Her mother says that Zhané is the Swahili word for “fairy,” although no direct translation can be found on an Internet search. Qulyndreia Wallis says her own name means “to you with love.” The rest of the kids include Venjie Jr., 15; brother Vejon, 13; and sister Qunyquekya, 19.

According to several sources, the Swahili word for “fairy” is jini — reasonably close to Zhané, actually.

From a Slate article about the papal conclave:

From early on, many popes changed their names to honor Christian saints or earlier popes, and to show their Christian faith by abandoning pagan names (such as Gerbert). Starting around 1000, the practice became formalized, but the choice of a new name was somewhat political, and popes were often influenced by other church officials. In the 13th century, popes started to choose their names independently. The use of numbers began in the 6th century, when the second Pelagius took the suffix “junior.” (He’s now referred to as Pelagius II.)

From a Stir post about the pros and cons sharing baby names pre-birth:

The pros of the share-nothing route is that you can blithely stick to your guns and not be dissuaded by friends’ grimaces, underwhelmed shrugs, or regrettable “sounds-like-a-stripper-to-me”-type comments. The bad part is … the same. You get no feedback! And making arguably one of the most important decisions of your life in a vacuum can be tough. Would you want to pick your wedding dress without your friends around to tell you that a mermaid silhouette is really not for you?

[…]

By telling other people you get to hear how it sounds when you say it and see if you’re still committed to it even if — and especially if — you have to defend it. No doubt some comments will be ridiculous, have nothing to do with you (ex. “I went to day camp with a girl called X and she threw up on the bus every day”), and/or possibly freak you out (ex. “That was my ex’s name. He was a cutter.”). Still, if you love the name despite the insults, isn’t that a great way to tell if it’s The One?

From a(nother) Stir post about “Teen Mom” Leah Messer and her new baby Adalynn:

[S]he is spending the whole week correcting every media report out there on how to spell the baby’s name. Whoops!

The problem started when US Weekly spelled the little girl’s name with two “d”s instead of one, and just spiraled from there. Leah has had to turn to social media to make the correction.

Sounds like the Teen Mom just got a taste of what happens when you decide you need your baby’s name to be insanely “unique.”

From a Baby Names in the News post about using a win-win approach for baby naming:

Shared Goals to Consider:

  • Would you both like to wind up with a name that reflects well on your child?
  • Would you both like to find a name your child will enjoy and want to keep?
  • Would you both be willing to screen a name under consideration for “user-friendliness” to make sure that it won’t be too hard to spell or pronounce, will be versatile, won’t create uncomfortable gender confusion, will make a positive impression, and won’t come across as dated, archaic, weird or embarrassing?
  • Would you both be willing to pick a middle name that provides a reasonable “fallback” in case the first name doesn’t work out for some reason?
  • Would you both agree that the selected name must be one that both parents like a lot and look forward to using?
  • Finally, would you both promise not to argue on behalf of (or worse, insist on) any names your partner doesn’t like?

By agreeing that the most important goals of the name search are to find a name that both parents and the child will enjoy using and to not argue about names one partner doesn’t like, you can happily start looking for a name that will be chosen based on collaboration and consensus.

From Summer Pierre’s blog post about her name:

I grew up in what I have learned since then, is considered an ALTERNATIVE environment. I went to a hippie school, and my classmates had names that included Andromeda, Boreas, Vitali, Oak, and Rolly (pronounced Role-e) (hi guys!). Considering the roll call, I was kind of the “Jane Smith” of the group. However, regardless of the pillows on the floor, and meetings where we had to discuss our feelings, I still got teased on the playground and called names. None of them were season-based. They were things that rhymed with my name–names that STILL make me cringe and feel bad. Names like “Bummer” and “Dumber.”

[…]

Then, I moved to the East Coast. East coast people find it a very funny name. This morning, as it would happen, two co-workers discussed my name in front of me, and one said, “I didn’t think it was your real name.” I get that a lot. Maybe it’s because there aren’t any hippies left here. I know the cultural consciousness happened on the east coast, because I’ve met people that had hippies for parents, but it seems that east coast hippies have moved on to academic postings or documentary filmmakers, and they seem to name their kids Amos or Noah, and not after seasons or other natural occurrences.

From a Multiple Mayhem Mamma post on the ridiculousness of “stolen” baby names:

The reality of the situation is that none of us has “dibs” on a name. As with any other intangible objects, names exist within the confines of our minds and, while a particular name can indeed evoke certain emotions (we all have a visceral reaction to the name of the childhood bully who taunted us, or similar), it does not belong to a particular person or family. To that end, it cannot be “stolen” or otherwise pilfered, despite protestations to the contrary.

From a Daily Mail article about a new species of dinosaur that’s been named after a little girl:

Palaeontologists announced this week that fossilised remains found on a stretch of Isle of Wight beach in 2008 had been finally identified as a new species of flying dinosaur.

The remains were discovered by Daisy Morris, who, now aged nine, has amassed a collection of fossils and animal remains so extensive it led one expert to describe her bedroom as ‘resembling a natural history museum.’

[…]

And when it came to naming the creature, the experts looked to its young finder for inspiration, officially dubbing it Vectidraco Daisymorrisae.

The Latin elements in Vectidraco translate to “Wight” (vectis) and “dragon” (draco).

Baby Names No Longer Needed – Elise, Dexter, Phoebe

We helped five readers brainstorm for baby names in December of last year and January of this year.

So far, I’ve heard back from three of those five. Beth decided on Elise, Abbie chose Phoebe and Dexter, and Kathleen hasn’t made a decision yet (she’s due next month).

I have yet to hear from Julie and Shana.

Baby Name Needed – Girl Name for Lydia’s Little Sister

A reader named Beth is expecting her second daughter in a few weeks. She writes:

My first is named Lydia and we have a very Polish last name. After what has been an excruciating process, my husband and I have come up with three names we can agree on. He loves Sylvia, as do I, but I wondered if it was too sing-song-y with big sister Lydia. I would probably want to nickname her Sylvie for that reason. We also like Stella, but I think the name is fast becoming the new Ava, Sophia or Ella. Francesca is the wild card-we like it, just not sure if it would fit well enough. What are your thoughts, and if you have any suggestions, they would be welcome!

One thing I noted was Beth’s use of the verbs like and love. She and her husband “like” Stella and Francesca, but they “love” Sylvia. I think that difference is key.

Over and over again I see people return to the name they loved after putting it aside to consider the dozens of names they liked. (As if all the lesser names had to be ruled out before a decision could finally be made.) If Sylvia is the one name Beth and her husband both love, perhaps that fact is more important than anything else…?

But let’s put diction aside for now and look at each name individually.

Is Sylvia too close to Lydia? It has the same length, the same rhythm, the same ending. I think I’d be against the pairing if not for the nickname Sylvie. That knocks off a syllable, alters the rhythm, changes the ending. If Sylvia will be known as Sylvie, well, that might just solve the problem.

I think it’s smart to be wary of Stella. I’m not sure that it has the momentum to become as popular as Sophia or Ava, but you never know.

Ah, Francesca! I’m a big fan of the Fran- names, so I get excited when I learn that someone might be using one. I think Lydia and Francesca fit together quite well. Even better than Lydia and Stella, actually. If this were a beauty contest, I’d probably give Sylvia/Sylvie the tiara, but I’d make Francesca the first runner-up.

I’d hate to make the naming process any more excruciating than it’s already been, but a few name suggestions did come to mind as I was typing:

Callista
Celeste
Isadora
Sabrina
Theresa
Vivienne

Do you have an opinion or suggestion you’d like to share with Beth? Please comment below and/or cast a vote in the poll (sidebar).

Update – The baby has arrived! To see the name Beth chose, either scroll down through the comments or just click here.

Miss America Names – Caleche, Jillayne, Osjha, Tangra, Venus

Did you know that there have been Miss Americas named Venus (1944), BeBe (1948), Jacque (1949), Vonda (1965) and Leanza (1993)?

Miss America 1926, Norma Smallwood, had the middle name Des Cygne, which she then passed along to her daughter as a first name (paired with the middle name L’Amour).

In 2000, the Miss America pageant included delegates named Brandee (from New Hampshire), Brandi (from New York) and Brandy (from Arkansas).

Other interesting names I spotted skimming over lists of delegates include…

  • Acacia Courtney (2015)
  • Adria Elaine Easton (1970)
  • Alansa Rounds Carr (1960)
  • Aloha Eugenia Porter (1926)
  • Ami Vice (2005) – just two letters away from Miami Vice!
  • Aniska T. Tonge (2013)
  • Annalou Johnston (1949)
  • Annyse Diane Sherman (1942)
  • Armelia Carol Ohmart (1946)
  • Arron Racheal Wendel (2001)
  • BaShara Crystelle Chandler (1994)
  • Bee Jay Johnston (1949)
  • Bethlene Pancoast (2007)
  • Bindhu Pamarthi (2014)
  • Brantlee Corinne Price (1970)
  • Burma Ann Davis (1969)
  • Caleche Manos (2008)
  • Charlavan Baker (1955)
  • Chardelle Hayward (1953)
  • Che’Vonne Dalora Burton (2001)
  • Chuti Lynn Tiu (1995)
  • Clark Janell Davis (2016)
  • Cloris Leachman (1946)
  • Coline-Helen Kaualoku Aiu (1975)
  • Cullen Johnson (1995)
  • Dakeita Tania Vanderburg (1984)
  • Dalyce Gail Smith (1956)
  • Daphne Jean Cochran (1981)
  • Darby Lynn Moore (1975)
  • Daureen Podenski (1980)
  • Delight Michelle Scheck (1999)
  • Dell-Fin Kala’upaona Po’aha (1951)
  • Dellynne Cole Catching (1969)
  • Delta Burke (1975)
  • Denby Annette Kwai Foong Dung (2002)
  • Devanni Partridge (2010)
  • Djuan Keila Trent (2011)
  • Dusene Alee Vunovich (1961)
  • Du Sharme Le Shette Carter (1993)
  • Dustin-Leigh Konzelman (2006)
  • Echo Layne Rost (1974)
  • Edithea Lois Wilde (1923)
  • Eisa Megan Krushansky (1998)
  • Eldrida Fisk (1922)
  • Ethelda Bernice Kenvin (1923)
  • Eudora Leola Mosby (2006)
  • Eugenia Alexandra Primis (2002)
  • Fairfax Bushnell Mason (1948)
  • Ferol Amelia Dumas (1941)
  • Fianna Marie Dickson (2004)
  • Florine Holt (1939)
  • Freita Fuller (1973)
  • Galen Aubrey Giaccone (2009)
  • GiGi Marie Gordon (1997)
  • Glenna Marie Pohly (1953)
  • Glynnelle Hubbard (1958)
  • Gordean Leilehua Lee (1960)
  • Gunnel Ragone (1969)
  • Gussie Short (1937)
  • Guylyn Elaine Remmenga (1979)
  • Haunani Asing (1977)
  • Hela Yungst (1971)
  • Helmar Liederman (1922)
  • Herma Loy Elliott (1963)
  • Honey Castro (1986)
  • Iora June Victor (1944)
  • Irmgard Dietel (1937)
  • Itha Duerrhammer (1944)
  • Jade-Romejii Smalls (2000)
  • Jalee Fuselier (2011)
  • Jaleigh Jeffers (1983)
  • Jeffie Lorraine Ventling (1998)
  • Jenileigh Avriel Sawatzke (2007)
  • Jere Wright (1957)
  • Jillayne Ann Mertens (2002)
  • Jini Boyd (1946)
  • Jinx Burrus (1951)
  • Junnie Young Cross (2001)
  • Kalyn Evel Chapman (1994)
  • Kama Katherine Boland (2000)
  • Kanoe Aberegg (1994)
  • Kanoelehua Kaumeheiwa (1974)
  • Kapri Allyse Rose (2002)
  • Karissa Carol Rushing (1991)
  • Karlyne La Rae Abele (1951)
  • Kehaulani Tiffanie Naleialoha Christian (2003)
  • Kendi Lynn Brown (1979)
  • Keone Cook (1981)
  • Keungsuk Kim (1982)
  • Kiaraliz Medina (2013)
  • Kinila Latia Callendar (2005)
  • Kippy Lou Brinkman (1966)
  • La Bruce Sherrill (1940)
  • LaFrance Boyett (1935)
  • LaRue Wilson (1935)
  • Lencola Sullivan (1981)
  • Lenena Ruth Holder (1994)
  • Lennie Josephine Nobles (1946)
  • Ligaya Stice (1990)
  • Loveta Chera-Lyn Cook (1999)
  • Luna Lynn McClain (1947)
  • Madonna Kimberly Emond (2004)
  • Marlinda Mason (1960)
  • Marshawn LaToya Evans (2002)
  • Mattigene Palmore (1939)
  • Melanne Pennington (1985)
  • Merissa Starnes (1998)
  • MerriBeth Cox (2013)
  • Merrilee Gay Miller (1965)
  • Mifaunwy Dolores Shunatona (1941)
  • Mikka Lynn Darby (1989)
  • Mineola Graham (1944)
  • Molla Barnett (1926)
  • Monnie Drake (1940)
  • Monta Anne Maki (1980)
  • Mozelle Ransome (1927)
  • Najla Ghazi (1988)
  • Naylene Vuurens (1979)
  • Nelle Xerminia Owens (1942)
  • Neva Jackson (1923)
  • Noralyn Olsen (1971)
  • Onalee Louise Olson (1966)
  • Osjha Michelle Anderson (2000)
  • Othelia Mitsch (1935)
  • Pennisue Largent (1982)
  • Pepper Donna Shore (1947)
  • Pilialoha Kalai Gaison (2007)
  • Ramsey Carpenter (2015)
  • Rana Beth Jones (2004)
  • Ra Nae Petersen (1977)
  • Rashida Tulani Jolley (2001)
  • Raven Malone (1947)
  • ReJean Ann Bowar (1962)
  • Renelle Kimberly Richardson (2001)
  • Ronnee Brunk (1968)
  • Sabrian Olena Rubin (2005)
  • Savvy Shields (2016)
  • Scarlotte Lee Deupree (2003)
  • Semmelle Shantae Ford (2001)
  • Seva Celeste Day (1976)
  • Shandi Finnessey (2003)
  • Sherrylyn Patecell (1961)
  • ShonDrell Latasha Hunter (2004)
  • Soncee Brown (1992)
  • Stuart Fraser Johnson (1959)
  • Tangra Lea Riggle (2003)
  • Tanssia Zara (1922)
  • Timmy Weston (1945)
  • Tippe Emmott (2013)
  • Titilayo Rachel Adedokun (1994)
  • Tosca Carolyn Masini (1951)
  • Toula Hages Straton (1943)
  • Toyia Tynae Taylor (2000)
  • Trelynda Kerr (1984)
  • Urania Judith Nicholaides (1946)
  • Valli Suzanne Kugler (2003)
  • Vanadora Baker (1940)
  • Veena Michelle Goel (2005)
  • Velva Irene Robbins (1954)
  • Wayring Smathers (1937)
  • Wilda Georgine Bowman (1946)
  • Wildeana Withers (1925)
  • Wren Prather (1973)
  • Yanci Jane Yarbrough (2000)
  • Yetta Haber (1925)
  • Ysleta LaVerne Leissner (1949)
  • Yun Tau Zane (1948)
  • Zasada Lord (1926)
  • Zulma Caballero Lopez (1938)

Which of the above do you like best?

For more beauty queen names, check out these posts on Miss Teen USA Names and Miss USA Names.

Sources: Miss America, Norma Smallwood – Wikipedia

[Latest update to this post: Aug. 2017]

Baby Name Needed – Name for Baby Girl #4

A reader named Darlene is having trouble coming up with a name for her fourth baby girl (due in 2 months). Her first three daughters are Whitney Anne, Presley Kaye, and Gracey Dale. She and her husband have come up with possibilities like Lindsey, Kristen, Nicole, Jenna, Carley, Valerie and Meloney — but none of them have really emerged as favorites.

What do you think, readers? Whitney, Presley, Gracey, and … what?

My opinion is that the fourth daughter’s name ought to continue the pattern: 2-syllable first name ending with an “ee”-sound, then a 1-syllable middle name. Trying something new at this point might give rise to jealousy.

With that in mind, I think the following first names might work: Ainsley, Annie, Bailey, Chelsea, Elsie, Finley, Hadley, Harley, Jody, Josie, Kacey, Lainey, Lilly, Marley, Riley or Zoe.

For middle names, I came up with Beth, Bree, Claire, Faith, Hope, Jade, Jane, Kate, Paige, Reese, Rose, Sage and Tess.

As for combinations… Ainsley Jane? Riley Claire? Zoe Rose? Marley Kate?

Please leave a comment with your suggestions for Darlene.