How popular is the baby name Billie in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Billie.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Billie


Posts that Mention the Name Billie

The Height of Eilish (…So Far)

katie, eilish, twins, siamese, 1990s, baby name,
Katie and Eilish Holton, born in Ireland in 1988

Once the SSA releases the 2019 baby name data, we’ll know just how high the name Eilish — an anglicized form of Eilís, the Irish Gaelic form of Elizabeth or Alice — climbed during Billie Eilish’s breakout year.

While we wait, though, we can go back in time to learn why the Irish name Eilish saw its strongest usage in the U.S. in the mid-1990s.

The year Eilish debuted in the data, 1977, it was given to a mere five babies. The year it reappeared, 1993, it was given to nearly two dozen babies. (The same year, we see the reappearance of Ailish and the debut of one-hit wonder Ilish.) And when Eilish peaked in usage three years later, the number had climbed to nearly three dozen.

  • 1997: 27 baby girls named Eilish
  • 1996: 35 baby girls named Eilish [peak]
  • 1995: 17 baby girls named Eilish
  • 1994: 14 baby girls named Eilish
  • 1993: 23 baby girls named Eilish
  • 1992: unlisted
  • 1991: unlisted

So what brought Eilish back?

Eilish Holton, a conjoined twin (along with her sister Katie) who was born in County Kildare, Ireland, in August of 1988. The pair were “joined from shoulder to hip, with four arms and two shared legs. Each had her own heart and spinal column but shared one pelvis, one large bowel, one bladder and one kidney.” Eilish was on the right-hand side, Katie on the left-hand side.

The girls came to the attention of Americans thanks to the British TV documentary Katie and Eilish (1992), which aired in the U.S. in May of 1993.

katie and eilish, documentary, television, 1993, conjoined, twins,

The Peabody Award-winning documentary followed the 3-year-old twins over the twelve months leading up to their 15-hour separation surgery, which took place in London in April of 1992. The film concluded after the operation had taken place and Katie had passed away (due to heart failure, just days after the separation) leaving Eilish as the sole surviving twin.

The documentary’s follow-up, Eilish: Life Without Katie (1995), which aired in the U.S. in July of 1996, is what pushed the name to peak usage three years later.

The second film followed 6-year-old Eilish, who was now getting around with the help of a prosthetic leg (dubbed “Katie,” poignantly). Unlike the first film, though, this one wasn’t well-received by reviewers; one described it as “maddeningly unchallenging, uninformative and undemanding.”

What are your thoughts on the baby name Eilish? Would you use it?

Sources: Katie and Eilish – ITV Studios, The Most Intimate Bond – Time, Such Sweetened Sorrow – The Independent, Life after Katie – Independent.ie, Eilish – Behind the Name

P.S. Eilish Holton’s four other sisters are named Claire, Therese, Mairead, and Maeve.

Name Quotes 82: Rosebud, Pirate, Habakkuk

From an article about the Mad About You reboot:

On the original show, Theresa was portrayed by Burnett as a bit overbearing. But, she always brought extra love…and helped them name their daughter Mabel. When Jamie and Paul Buchman (Paul Reiser) couldn’t decide on a name for their baby, Theresa proclaimed that “Mothers Always Bring Extra Love,” an homage to The Dick Van Dyke Show where Rob and Laura explain Ritchie’s middle name. The Buchman’s decide to call their daughter Mabel.

The conversation between Rob Petrie (dad) and Ritchie Rosebud Petrie (son) referenced above, from the 1962 Dick Van Dyke episode “What’s in a Middle Name?” [vid]:

Rob: …and there’s no reason to look so sad, your middle name isn’t really Rosebud.

Ritchie: Yes it is, my birth certificate says it’s Rosebud.

Rob: Yes it does, but do you know why?

Ritchie: No, but I wish it was ‘Jim.’

[…]

Rob: So you see, Ritch, actually, your middle name is Robert, Oscar, Sam, Edward, Benjamin, Ulysses, David. And, the initials to all of your middle names spells…

Ritchie: Rosebud!

(The seven names were suggestions from various family members. To see the scene and hear the full explanation, click the link to the video.)

From the 2018 children’s book Who Is Pele? by James Buckley, Jr.:

Edson Arantes do Nascimento was born on October 23, 1940, in the tiny village of Três Corações (say: TRACE kor-ah-SOYS), Brazil. Even in 1940, there were many parts of the world that did not have electricity. Most of southeastern Brazil was one of those areas. In honor of their village finally getting electricity, Edson’s parents named their first son after the American inventor Thomas Edison.

From a BBC interview with Billie Eilish:

Q: Hello Billie Eilish… Have I pronounced that right?

A: Yes! It’s eye-lish, like eyelash with a lish.

Q: Your family name is O’Connell, though, so is that a stage name?

It is my middle name. So I’m Bille Eilish Pirate Baird O’Connell.

Q: Pirate! That’s an amazing name.

Pretty weird, right? Pirate was going to be my middle name but then my uncle had a problem with it because pirates are bad. Then Baird is my mother’s name.

From an NPR interview with Leonardo DiCaprio:

My father tells me that they were on their honeymoon at the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, I believe. They were looking at a da Vinci painting, and allegedly I started kicking furiously while my mother was pregnant. And my father took that as a sign, and I suppose DiCaprio wasn’t that far from da Vinci. And so, my dad, being the artist that he is, said, “That’s our boy’s name.”

From a Christianity Today article called “Sorry, James and David: Silas and Obadiah Are Today’s Trending Baby Names“:

Looking forward, there’s plenty more space for creativity with highly unique but still highly religious names. Of the 2,606 biblical names I track in my ongoing research, only 811 ever had a year with more than 4 baby boys or girls given that name. We haven’t yet seen kids named Abijam or Paltiel, nor have we seen name fads for Philetus or Berechiah. Even notably faithful biblical figures like Ehud, Elkanah, Habakkuk, Hilkiah, and Jehonadab have been passed over.

If you ever come across an interesting name-related quote (or article), please let me know!

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: C (Part 2)

Looking for a rare girl name with a retro feel? Here are dozens of ideas, all from very old films (1910s-1940s).

The names below are the second half of the C-list (Ci- to Cy-). The first half has the Ca- to Ch- names.

Enjoy!

Cicely
Cicely was a character name in multiple films, including The Hoyden’s Awakening (1913) and Next Time We Love (1936).

  • Usage of the baby name Cicely.

Cicily
Cicily was a character name in multiple films, including The Cat Creeps (1930) and The Cat and the Canary (1939).

  • Usage of the baby name Cicily.

Ciel
Ciel was a character played by actress Evelyn Dumo in the film The Black Butterfly (1916).

  • Usage of the baby name Ciel.

Ciglia
Ciglia was a character played by actress Camilla Horn in the film Eternal Love (1929).

Cina
Cina Burton was a character played by actress Julia Swayne Gordon in the short film The Troublesome Step-Daughter (1912).

  • Usage of the baby name Cina.

Cinders
Cinders was a character played by actress Marie Doro in the film Lost and Won (1917).

Cissie
Cissie was a character name in multiple films, including Twinkletoes (1926) and Experiment Perilous (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Cissie.

Cissy
Cissy Fitzgerald was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in England in 1873. Her birth name was Marie Kathleen Kipping. Cissy was also a character name in multiple films, including Just Cissy’s Little Way (short, 1913) and Sunny Side Up (1926).

  • Usage of the baby name Cissy.

Citronella
Citronella Dedough was a character played by actress Ethel Teare in the short film Ham the Detective (1915).

Clairette
Clairette Montieth was a character played by actress Linda Arvidson in the short film A Fair Rebel (1914).

Clarabell
Clarabell Brooks was a character played by actress Betty Furness in the film The 3 Wise Guys (1936).

Clarabella
Clarabella was a character played by actress Ona Munson in the film Wild Geese Calling (1941).

Clarabelle
Clarabelle was a character name in multiple films, including Keystone Hotel (1935) and George White’s Scandals (1945).

Clarette
Clarette Clare was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s.

Claribel
Claribel was a character name in multiple films, including The Magic Bon Bons (1915) and Strike Me Pink (1936).

Claribell
Claribell Lotsadough was a character played by actress Gale Henry in the film Marble Heads (1917).

Clarice
Clarice was a character name in multiple films, including A Question of Identity (1914) and The Family Upstairs (1926).

Clarine
Clarine Seymour was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in New York in 1898.

Clarita
Clarita was a character name in multiple films, including The Ruling Passion (1910) and Three Keys (1925).

Clary
Clary was a character name in multiple films, including Bar 20 Rides Again (1935) and The Law West of Tombstone (1938).

  • Usage of the baby name Clary.

Claudette
Claudette Colbert was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1960s. She was born in France in 1903. Claudette was also a character played by actress Glenda Farrell in the film Traveling Saleslady (1935).

Claudine
Claudine was a character name in multiple films, including The Nut (1921) and Fifth Avenue (1926).

Clelia
Clelia Matania was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1980s. She was born in England in 1918.

  • Usage of the baby name Clelia.

Clelie
Clelie Gordon was a character played by actress Fredi Washington in the film Ouanga (1936).

Clemency
Clemency Warlock was a character played by actress Kay Francis in the film Cynara (1932).

Clementina
Clementina was a character name in multiple films, including The Glory of Clementina (1922) and The Desert Song (1929).

Cleone
Cleone Meredith was a character played by various actresses (like Madge Stuart and Elissa Landi) in various films called The Amateur Gentleman, all based on the novel of the same name by Jeffrey Farnol.

Cleopatra
Cleopatra was a character name in multiple films, including Cleopatra – Queen of Egypt (1912) and Oh! Oh! Cleopatra (1931).

Click
“Click” Stewart was a character played by actress Glenda Farrell in the film Exposed (1938).

Clo-clo
Clo-Clo was a character played by actress Margo in the film The Leopard Man (1943).

Clodah
Clodah Harrison was a character played by actress Dorothy Cumming in the film The Female (1924).

Clorinda
Clorinda was a character name in multiple films, including The Lifted Veil (1917) and A Lady of Quality (1924).

Clothilde
Clothilde was a character name in multiple films, including The Breath of Araby (1915) and The Count of Monte Cristo (1934).

Clotilda
Clotilda was a character played by actress Louise Beavers in the film Kisses for Breakfast (1941).

Clotilde
Clotilde de Marelle was a character played by actress Angela Lansbury in the film The Private Affairs of Bel Ami (1947).

Cluny
Cluny Brown was a character played by actress Jennifer Jones in the film Cluny Brown (1946).

Clyne
Clyne Dacia was an actress who appeared in 1 film in 1922.

Clytemnestra
Clytemnestra was a character played by actress Helen Kelly in the film M’Liss (1918).

Clytie
Clytie was a character name in multiple films, including The Danger Game (1918) and The Heart Line (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Clytie.

Cobina
Cobina Wright was an actress who appeared in films in the 1940s. She was born in New York in 1921.

  • Usage of the baby name Cobina (which debuted in the data in 1939).

Colomba
Colomba was a character played by actress Eily Malyon in the film The White Angel (1936).

Columbine
Columbine was a character name in multiple films, including A Harlequinade Let Loose (1912) and The Tidal Wave (1920).

Comfort
Comfort was a character played by actress Mary Boland in the film The Pursuit of Happiness (1934).

Concha
Concha was a character name in multiple films, including The Canyon of Light (1926) and The Devil Is a Woman (1935).

  • Usage of the baby name Concha.

Conchita
Conchita Montenegro was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1940s. She was born in Spain in 1911. Her birth name was Concepción Andrés Picado. Conchita was also a character name in multiple films, including A Branded Soul (1917) and Border Romance (1929).

Concordia
Concordia Selander was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Sweden in 1861.

Connaught
Connaught O’Brien was a character played by actress June Collyer in the film Hangman’s House (1928).

Connemara
Connemara Moore was a character played by actress Marie Prevost in the film Bobbed Hair (1925).

Constantia
Constantia was a character name in multiple films, including The Conquest of Constantia (1915) and Little Lord Fauntleroy (1936).

Constantina
Constantina Ivaneska was a character played by actress Tala Birell in the film The Power of the Whistler (1945).

Consuelo
Consuelo was a character played by actress Norma Shearer in the film He Who Gets Slapped (1924).

Cordova
Cordova was a character played by actress Mona Barrie in the film When a Girl’s Beautiful (1947).

Corie
Corie was a character played by actress Nydia Westman in the film Two Alone (1934).

  • Usage of the baby name Corie.

Corinna
Corinna Mura was an actress who appeared in films from the 1940s to the 1950s. She was born in 1909. Corinna was also a character played by actress Jacqueline Logan in the film The House of Youth (1924).

Corliss
Corliss Palmer was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1930s. She was born in Georgia in 1902. Corliss was also a character played by actress Gloria Grey in the film Unknown Dangers (1926).

Cornelia
Cornelia was a character name in multiple films, including Drugged Waters (1916) and Cover Girl (1944).

Corunna
Corunna was a character played by actress Louise Platt in the film Captain Caution (1940).

Creola
Creola was a character played by actress Lillian Yarbo in the film Wives Under Suspicion (1938).

  • Usage of the baby name Creola.

Creota
Creota was a character played by actress Rose Dione in the film It Happened in Paris (1919).

Cressy
Cressy was a character played by actress Blanche Sweet in the film Fighting Cressy (1919).

Cristobella
Cristobella was a character played by actress Anna Demetrio in the film Born to Be Wild (1938).

Croessa
Croessa was a character played by actress Gina Marangoni in the film Cabiria (1914).

Croisine
Croisine Bouhouhorts was a character played by Edith Barrett in the film The Song of Bernadette (1943).

Cuca
Cuca was a character played by actress Armida in the film Fiesta (1941).

  • Usage of the baby name Cuca.

Curly
Curly Flagg was a character played by actress Miriam Hopkins in the film She Loves Me Not (1934).

  • Usage of the baby name Curly.

Cyd
Cyd Charisse was an actress who appeared in films from the 1940s to the 1970s. She was born in Texas in 1922. Her birth name Tula Ellice Finklea.

  • Usage of the baby name Cyd.

Cymba
Cymba Roget was a character played by actress Helen Gardner in the film The Sleep of Cymba Roget (1920).

Cynthy
Cynthy was a character played by actress Peggy Hyland in the film The Rebellious Bride (1919).

Cyprienne
Cyprienne Marcey was a character played by actress Billie Burke in the film Let’s Get a Divorce (1918).

Cyrilla
Cyrilla Drew was a character played by actress Caroline Cooke in the film Roses of Yesterday (1913).

Which of the above do you like best?

Pop Culture Baby Name Game, 2019

pop culture baby name game, 2019

Time for the annual Pop Culture Baby Name Game!

But first: Happy birthday, Elvis Presley! (He would have been 85 today.)

So now, think back to 2019. Think of all the pop culture that caught your attention. Think of movies, music, TV shows, social media, sports, video games, news, politics, products, and so forth.

Which of these things had an influence on U.S. baby names last year, do you think? Which baby names will see higher usage (or appear for the very first time) in the 2019 data thanks to 2019 pop culture?

Here are some names to start with:

  • Adeya – from celebrity baby Adeya (born in March to Kehlani)
  • Alita – from the movie Alita: Battle Angel
  • Archie – from royal baby Archie (born in May to Harry & Meghan)
  • Billie – from singer Billie Eilish
  • Brixton – from the movie Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw
  • Deckard – from the movie Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw
  • Dorian – from hurricane Dorian
  • Eilish – also from singer Billie Eilish
  • Gloria – from the St. Louis Blues anthem “Gloria
  • Greedy – from NFL player Andraez Montrell “Greedy” Williams
  • Greta – from environmental activist Greta Thunberg
  • Lizzo – from rapper/singer Lizzo (originally a Melissa)
  • Luce – from the movie Luce
  • Maleficent – from the movie Maleficent: Mistress of Evil
  • Nipsey – from the late rapper Nipsey Hussle
  • Post – from rapper Post Malone
  • Psalm – from celebrity baby Psalm (born in May to Kim & Kanye)
  • Saybie – from newsworthy baby Saybie
  • Shaed – from the band Shaed (“Trampoline”)
  • Sulwe – from the book Sulwe by Lupita Nyong’o
  • Wick – from the movie John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum

A few names from the 2018 game (Kamala? Kelleth? Sanni? Marsai?) might still be applicable as well.

What other names should we add to the list? Let me know by commenting below. Please don’t forget to mention the pop culture influence!

I’ll be posting the game results in May of 2020, a few days after the SSA releases the 2019 baby name data. If you don’t want to miss the results post, just subscribe to NBN!