How popular is the baby name Boris in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Boris and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Boris.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Boris

Number of Babies Named Boris

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Boris

Popular Baby Names in Bulgaria, 2013

Bulgaria’s top baby names of 2013 were released last month.

According to preliminary data from the National Statistical Institute (NSI), the most popular baby names last year were Viktoria and Georgi.

Here are Bulgaria’s top 19 girl names and top 19 boy names of 2013:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Viktoria (2.9% of baby girls)
2. Nikol (2.7%)
3. Maria (2.4%)
4. Alexandra (1.7%)
5. Gabriela (1.5%)
6. Raya (1.2%)
7. Yoana (1.2%)
8. Simona
9. Elena
10. Dariya
11. Teodora
12. Siyana
13. Mihaela
14. Gergana
15. Magdalena
16. Bozhidara
17. Monika
18. Ivayla
19. Karina
1. Georgi (3.55% of baby boys)
2. Alexandar (3.1%)
3. Martin (2.9%)
4. Ivan (2.4%)
5. Dimitar (2.1%)
6. Nikola (2.1%)
7. Nikolay (2.0%)
8. Viktor
9. Kristiyan
10. Kaloyan
11. Boris
12. Teordor
13. Bozhidar
14. Petar
15. Stefan
16. Alex
17. Ivaylo
18. Mihail
19. Angel

Source: Most popular baby names in Bulgaria – Georgi, Viktoria

The Baby Name Yeltsin

Boris Yeltsin
Boris Yeltsin
In mid-1991, Russian politician Boris Yeltsin became the first President of the Russian Federation.

In early 1992, the New York Times announced that President Bush and President Yeltsin had “proclaimed a new era of “friendship and partnership” as they declared a formal end to seven decades of rivalry” (i.e., the Cold War).

That same year, the baby name Yeltsin appeared on the SSA’s baby name list for the first time:

  • 1994: unlisted
  • 1993: 8 baby boys named Yeltsin
  • 1992: 7 baby boys named Yeltsin [debut]
  • 1991: unlisted

It stuck around one more year before disappearing again. (Perhaps because Yeltsin’s popularity declined drastically during the 1990s, as his economic policies caused mass poverty and hyperinflation in Russia.)

What does the Russian surname Yeltsin mean? “The Yeltsin surname derives from yel’, Russian for “fir tree,” and is a fairly common one in the [Ural] region,” which is where Boris was born.



Invented Baby Names in Cuba

Some imaginative baby names that have been bestowed in Cuba in the last few decades:

  • Adianez – Zenaida backwards
  • Ailed – Delia backwards
  • Boris – from the foreign name trend
  • Aledmys
  • Danyer – from the English word “danger”
  • Dayesi
  • Disami
  • Geyne – combination of Geronimo and Nelly
  • Hanoi – geographical term
  • Katia – from the foreign name trend
  • Leydi – from the English word “lady”
  • Maivi – from the English word “maybe”
  • Mayren – combination of Mayra and Rene
  • Migdisray – combination of Migdalia and Raymundo
  • Odlanier – Reinaldo backwards
  • Olnavy – from “Old Navy”
  • Orazal – Lazaro backwards
  • Robelkis – combination of Roberto and Belkis
  • Tatiana – from the foreign name trend
  • Usnavi – from “U.S. Navy”
  • Widayesi
  • Yadel – from the y-name trend
  • Yakarta – geographical term (from Jakarta)
  • Yamisel – from the y-name trend
  • Yander – from the y-name trend
  • Yaneymi – combination of Yanet and Mijail
  • Yanisey – from the y-name trend
  • Yasnaya – geographical term (maybe from Yasnaya Polyana?)
  • Yirmara – from the y-name trend
  • Yoanni – from the y-name trend
  • Yoelkis – from the y-name trend
  • Yohendry – from the y-name trend
  • Yolaide – from the y-name trend
  • Yordanka – from the foreign name trend
  • Yosbel – from the y-name trend
  • Yotuel – from the Spanish words “yo, tu, el” (I, you, he)
  • Yovel – from the y-name trend
  • Yulieski – from the y-name trend
  • Yumara – from the y-name trend
  • Yumilsis – from the y-name trend
  • Yunier – from the y-name trend
  • Yuri – from the foreign name trend
  • Yuset – from the y-name trend

I harvested all of these from yesterday’s Julio or Juliabe? Inventing Baby Names Popular in Cuba — an article that shouldn’t surprise any of us, as we’ve been discussing imaginative Latin American names for a while now. Here are two posts about Cuba specifically: Y-name Generation, Hiroshima & Nagasaki.

Names Needed for Baby Boy

A reader named Leigh will be having a baby boy within the next few weeks. She writes:

I am a teacher and have heard so many names that I don’t want to name our child. My husband and I really like the name Miles, however, there are many new baby boys in my friend circle, named Miles. I really like Emmett, but my husband is afraid he’ll be mocked because people might only know of his name from the Twilight series. We’re interested in two or three syllable strong, unique (not necessarily unusual) names. A current front runner is Anders, possibly Anders Gray Hollyard*. We also like the name Lars. I guess I’m finding we like names that end in s!

First name and possible middle name suggestions to go with Anders would be greatly appreciated.

*Their surname isn’t Hollyard, but a like-sounding two-syllable h-name.

A few thoughts on the current favorites:

  • Miles: The popularity of this one has been on the rise for years, so it makes sense that you’re hearing it more often. I’m sure this has already come up, but just in case: Have you considered Milo or Niles as alternatives? They both sound a lot like Miles, but they’re not nearly as popular (i.e. only 29 babies were named Niles in 2010).
  • Emmett: Personally, I associate this name with Emmitt Smith, not the fictional vampire. And I’m not even a sports fan. This Twilight craze will blow over one day (thankfully!) and, when it does, these vampire/werewolf associations will fade. Exception: Renesmee.
  • Anders: I really like this one. I especially like that it shortens to the nickname Andy, allowing anyone with this name to flip back and forth between formal/unusual and informal/familiar, depending on the occasion. Versatility is always a good thing.
  • Lars: I have a strong association with this one as well, though I’m not sure how many others have it — Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich. So this one may prompt people to ask about the possible Metallica connection. Much cooler than a Twilight question, anyway.

Here are some other names, many with s-endings:


As far as middle names for Anders go, I think Gray is great. I think a one-syllable name with a hard sound (that g) sounds good in that spot. Other names that fit this description are Brett, Craig, Drake, Frank, Grant, Jack, Kent, Mark and Paul.

Which of the above names do you like best? What other names would you suggest to Leigh?

Update: The baby has arrived! Scroll down for the name (or just click here).

Baby Name Story – Petal

I know of two Petals born in 2009. One belongs to chef Jamie Oliver, and the other belongs to Renée Soeterik and Boris Milinkovich of Toronto.

How did the latter Petal get her name? Well, Renee was taking a bath, Boris was brushing his teeth, and they were discussing baby names.

A vase of beautiful mixed flowers, from Boris – sent for no particular reason – sat on a ledge near Renée’s feet. A petal fell on her toe; she said “Petal.”

…and Petal’s what stuck.

Most people think the baby’s name is “charming and unique,” according to Renée, but a few have said it sounds like a stripper name.

What’s your opinion on Petal?

Source: A winter’s tale turns to a pretty, perfect Petal