How popular is the baby name Boston in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Boston and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Boston.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Boston

Number of Babies Named Boston

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Boston

Iowa Baby Named Nash for Nashville, Gets Gifts

The first baby born in central Iowa (including Des Moines) in 2014 was Nash David Eddie, son of Lance and Christine Eddie.

The name “Nash” was chosen in honor of Nashville, Tennessee. It’s where Lance and Christine went on their first road trip together.

When the president/CEO of the Nashville Convention and Visitors Corp. learned about baby Nash, he sent the Eddie family a bunch of “Nashville-themed gifts, including a CD with music from the TV show “Nashville,” a guitar-shaped chocolate bar, the “Lisa Loeb’s Silly Singalong” children’s book and a four-foot-tall stuffed Gnash — the Nashville Predators hockey team mascot.”

The family will also get free passes to local attractions the next time they visit Nashville.

(Some of the other locational baby names I’ve blogged about over the years: Brighton, Endellion, Julian, Sonora, Kennedy, Aquinnah, Georgian, Washington, Boston, Newark, Florence, Cape Cod, Bronx, Montana, Helsinki.)

Sources: New parents bring in first baby of 2014, Des Moines’ first baby named for Nashville

Baby Names for Coffee Lovers (Namestorm #16)

baby names for coffee lovers

I’m posting on Sunday instead of Monday this week. Why? Because today (September 29) is International Coffee Day, and I thought it would be fun to celebrate by brainstorming for baby names for coffee lovers.

Here are some coffee-inspired names I’ve come up with so far…


Legend has it that an Ethiopian goatherd named Kaldi discovered the coffee plant during the 9th century. After watching his goats become lively after eating coffee berries, he tried the berries himself, then told some local monks about the plant. The story has inspired many coffee shop owners to name their establishments “Kaldi’s Coffee” and the like.


Another legend has it that, around the year 1600, Pope Clement VIII gave coffee his official papal approval. Coffee was new to Europe, and Catholic clerics wanted it banned because they associated it with Islam. But Clement tried it and liked it, and his thumbs-up made coffee acceptable (and, soon, very popular) in Europe.


Thousands of coffeehouses opened in England during the second half of the 17th century. During the 18th century, they came to be called Penny Universities because, for the one-penny price of cup of coffee, a person could learn a great deal from the many political, commercial and philosophical discussions going on inside. Like the Kaldi legend, this story has inspired many coffee shop owners to use the name “Penny University.”

Boston, Griffin

The U.S. would have been a tea-drinking nation if not for the Boston Tea Party, which made tea drinking unpatriotic. After that historic 1773 rebellion against the King George’s tea tax, Americans switched over to coffee and never looked back. The specific location of the Tea Party was Griffin’s Wharf (which no longer exists).


French naval officer Gabriel de Clieu transported (maybe smuggled?) a single coffee plant from Louis XIV’s royal garden to the French colony of Martinique in 1720. The trip across the Atlantic was arduous, but both he and the plant arrived intact. Fifty years later, Martinique boasted over 18 million coffee plants — all progeny of Gabriel’s original.


Colonel Francisco de Melo Palheta of Brazil traveled to French Guiana in 1727, ostensibly to help settle a border dispute. He ended up obtaining coffee seedlings for Brazil (the real objective of his mission, likely) in a rather sneaky way: within a bouquet of flowers. Brazil went on to become the world’s largest coffee producer.

Johann, Lieschen

In the 1730s, composer Johann Sebastian Bach wrote the “Coffee Cantata,” in which a young woman, Lieschen, argues with her father about her coffee addiction. She sings lines like “Coffee, I must have coffee” while he tries to force her to break her habit. Here’s the Coffee Cantata in English. (Lieschen is based on Lies, which is a diminutive of Elisabeth, which is the German form of Elizabeth.)

What other baby names for coffee lovers can you come up with?

Sources: Coffee @, History of Coffee – National Coffee Association, History of Coffee – Wikipedia

P.S. If you liked this, you might also like the namestorms for chocolate and beer.

Most Popular Baby Names in England and Wales, 2012

The most popular baby names in England and Wales were announced last week.

According to the Office for National Statistics, the region’s top names were Harry for boys and Amelia for girls.

Here are the top 20 girl names and top 20 boy names of 2012:

Top Girl Names Top Boy Names
1. Amelia
2. Olivia
3. Jessica
4. Emily
5. Lily
6. Ava
7. Mia
8. Isla
9. Sophie
10. Isabella
11. Evie
12. Ruby
13. Poppy
14. Grace
15. Sophia
16. Chloe
17. Isabelle
18. Ella
19. Freya
20. Charlotte
1. Harry
2. Oliver
3. Jack
4. Charlie
5. Jacob
6. Thomas
7. Alfie
8. Riley
9. William
10. James
11. Joshua
12. George
13. Ethan
14. Noah
15. Samuel
16. Daniel
17. Oscar
18. Max
19. Muhammad
20. Leo

The England-only top 20 included all of the above except for Archie (not Leo) on the boys’ side.

The Wales-only top 20 included Dylan, Mason, Logan, Tyler and Isaac (not Samuel, Daniel, Oscar, Max or Muhammad) for boys and Seren, Megan, Ffion and Layla (not Isla, Chloe, Freya or Charlotte) for girls.

Newbies to the England and Wales top 100 are…

  • Hugo, Sonny, Seth, Elliott, Theodore, Rory and Ellis for boys. (Out are Joel, Hayden, John, Ashton, Jackson, Ben and Reece.)
  • Mollie, Ivy, Darcey, Tilly, Sara and Violet for girls. (Out are Lexie, Lauren, Rebecca, Tia, Nicola and Kayla.)

Here’s a selection of names from the other end of the list (each given to 10 babies or fewer):

Rare Girl Names Rare Boy Names
Ambreen, Anest, Arrietty, Arzoo, Bowie, Charvi, Cressida, Csenge, Delyth, Devoiry, Eveie, Flourish, Gwenno, Liepa, Llio, Lliwen, Loveday, Mayameen, Mazvita, Migle, Makanaka, Ocean-Blu, Pip, Senuli, Strawberry, Testimony, Tiggy, Tulsi Alieu, Atreyu, Bede, Betzalel, Boston, Cavalli, Celt, Cem, Connah, Croyde, Dacre, Exodus, His, Huckleberry, James-Dean, Jools, Jovi, Louix, MD., Messiah, Motty, Neyo, Nuh, Nuno, Papa, Peregrine, Platon, Reco, Rhome, Soul, Ting, Tirth, Ugnius, Wing, Winner

Finally, here are some older posts with the 2011, 2010, 2009 and 2008 lists of most popular names in England & Wales.

Source: Baby Names, England and Wales, 2012 (ONS)

Unusual Noun-Names

In 1971, the editors of American Heritage asked readers to tell them about people who were “named after places, institutions, and events.” They offered examples like Wilmot Proviso Ragsdale, Legal Tender Coxey, Monongahela de Beaujeau and Illinois Central Wilson.

In 1972, the best of the submitted names were published. Here’s most of that list (with a few extra details):

Boston Raspberry, born circa 1900. While playing in a sandlot baseball game in Florida, he “clubbed the opposing shortstop to death with a bat after an argument over a called third strike.” He was sentenced to life in prison, but was later pardoned by Gov. Millard Fillmore Caldwell, “who said that anybody with a name like Boston Raspberry should have a full pardon.”

Budweiser Hawkins and Falstaff Hawkins. Brothers from Arkansas. Budweiser Hawkins upheld the tradition by naming his children Budweiser Jr., Falstaff, Virginia Dare (wine), Ron Rico (rum), Jose Cuervo (tequila), and Courvoisier (cognac). Bud Jr. is now Dr. Budweiser, and he has a website/blog called Weiser Living.

Carbon Petroleum Dubbs, 1881-1962. Named “Carbon P” at birth by his father, oil magnate Jesse Dubbs. He extended his middle name (the letter P) to “Petroleum” as an adult.

Easter Lily Gates, born on Easter Sunday (April 21) in 1889. She was the Supervisor of Elections in Broward County, FL, from 1929 to 1969. “Hats were her trademark.”

Eiffel Tower Sutherland, born circa 1894. On 10 Oct 1952, the Miami News mentioned her in this one-sentence story: “Danville, Ind. — When Betty Jean Weesney, home from a recent European trip, brought back a souvenir replica of the Eiffel Tower in Paris, it was the logical gift for just one friend–Eiffel Tower Sutherland.”

Mordecai Peter Centennial Brown, 1876-1948. Major League Baseball pitcher from Indiana. Born the year of the centennial. Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1949.

States Rights Gist, 1831-1864, and States Rights Jones, Jr., 1920-2002. The first was a Confederate brigadier general from South Carolina. His father, Nathaniel, was a fan of John C. Calhoun’s nullification politics (i.e. he thought states should have the right to nullify federal laws they deemed unconstitutional). The second was a USMC Colonel from Mississippi.

Through Trial And Tribulation We Enter Into The Kingdom Of Heaven Lindloff, 1881-1947. Known as “Trib.” Son of German immigrants.


Baby Names from Your Relationship with Your Partner

Could your relationship inspire a great baby name? I bet it could, if you ask yourself the right questions. Here are some to start you off:

How did the two of you meet?

  • Did a mutual acquaintance introduce you? What was that person’s name?
  • Did you meet while taking the same scuba class? What was the name of the instructor?
  • Did you meet while living in the same dorm at college? What was the name of the dorm? (If it’s a surname, what was the forename originally attached to it?)
  • Did you meet doing theater? What character names do you remember from the first production you worked on together?
  • Example: Actors Robby Benson and Karla DeVito named their daughter Lyric because they met while singing on Broadway.
  • Example: John Kipling and Alice Macdonald, future parents of writer Rudyard Kipling, met on the banks of Rudyard Lake in Staffordshire, England.

Think about your firsts.

  • Did you go out to dinner on your first date? What was the name of your waiter?
  • Did you have your first kiss while waiting in the lobby of a particular building? What was the name of the architect who designed the building?
  • What was the first movie you went to see together? What were the names of the lead characters?
  • Did you first say “I love you” to one another while picnicking in the park? What was the name of the park?

Think about other memorable experiences.

  • What’s the name of the street you first lived on together?
  • What’s the name of the coffee shop you used to go to every Friday night when you were dating?
  • Did your relationship ever hit a rough patch? What’s the name of the friend who helped you get through it out and stay together?
  • Have you ever done anything that you’re both really proud of (e.g. scaled a mountain, raised a lot of money for charity)? What names come to mind when you think of these things?
  • When you look through your collection of photographs, ticket stubs, playbills, receipts, brochures, fliers, and other paraphernalia, what names do you see? What other names are you reminded of?
  • Example: Filmmaker Rohan Fernando and his wife Carolle named their son Cohen because, on their second date, they went to see Leonard Cohen.
  • Example: “Late Night” host Jimmy Fallon name his daughter Winnie because he and his wife spent a lot of time (and were engaged) at Lake Winnipesaukee.

Engagement, Marriage, Honeymoon, Anniversaries

  • What’s the name of the person (e.g. pastor, priest, rabbi) who married you?
  • Wedding dresses often have female names in lieu of (or along with) model numbers–did yours?
  • Who sang your first dance song?
  • What’s the name of the hotel you stayed in on your honeymoon?
  • Example: San Francisco mayor Gavin Newsom named his daughter Montana because that’s where he and his wife got married.
  • Example: One of my commenters named her son Boston because she got engaged after running the Boston Marathon.

And now the fun part: What names can you come up with from your own relationship? What’s the story behind each one, and did you use (or do you plan to use) any of the names for your children?

Name in the News – Boston Harold

Boston Harold was born October 8 to John and Amanda Morgan of East Texas. His first name was inspired by the rock band Boston, and his middle name is a family name.

When his parents discovered there was a newspaper called the Boston Herald — just two letters away from Boston Harold–they ordered several copies of the October 8 edition to send out as part of the baby’s birth announcement.

The folks at the Boston Herald reciprocated by printing a story about Boston Harold just a few days later.