How popular is the baby name Brad in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Brad and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Brad.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Brad

Number of Babies Named Brad

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Brad

Name Quotes #45 – Traxton, Sadi, Yeimary

Ready for more name quotes?

From an essay by Hans Fiene about BuzzFeed’s criticism of Chip And Joanna Gaines’ church:

“People who give their kids weird names are unsophisticated morons,” I thought to myself when I was 23 years old and busy substitute-teaching a class full of kids named Brysalynn and Traxton.

[…]

Then, a few years later, one of my closest friends had a kid and named him something dumb. At the moment of said dumb-named kid’s entrance into this world, two options stood before me. Option A: I was wrong about baby names, and it was, in fact, possible to be an interesting, intelligent person while also being sweet on absurd baby monikers. Option B: Despite having a mountain of evidence that my friend was interesting and intelligent, this was all a ruse and he had been a moron the entire time.

From The Toast, an in-depth look at “ship names” — short for relationship names, i.e., name blends that represent fan-created relationships between fictional characters:

Onset conservation is also why we get Drarry (Draco/Harry), Dramione (Draco/Hermione), Klaroline (Klause/Caroline), Sterek (Stiles/Derek), Stydia (Stiles/Lydia), Clex (Clark Kent/Lex Luthor), Chlex (Chloe/Lex), Phrack (Phryne/Jack), Cherik (Charles/Erik), CroWen (Cristina/Owen), Bedward (Bella/Edward), Brucas (Brooke/Lucas), Brangelina (Brad/Angelina), and so on.

(“Olicity Is Real” was trending on Twitter recently…I wonder how long it’ll be before we start seeing ship names on birth certificates.)

From the 2007 New York Times obituary of The Mod Squad actor Tige Andrews (whose name was one of the top debut names of 1969):

Tiger Andrews was born on March 19, 1920, in Brooklyn; he was named after a strong animal to ensure good health, following a Syrian custom.

From a footnote in a 1986 translation of the book Reflections on the Motive Power of Fire (1824) by French scientist Nicolas-Léonard “Sadi” Carnot:

Sadi was named after the thirteenth-century Persian poet and naturalist, Saadi Musharif ed Din, whose poems, most notably the Gulistan (or Rose Garden), were popular in Europe in the late eighteenth century. It seems likely that Lazare [Sadi’s father] chose the name to commemorate his association, in the 1780s, with the Société des Rosati, an informal literary society in Arras in which a recurring theme was the celebration of the beauty of roses in poetry.

From Ed Sikov’s 2007 book Dark Victory: The Life of Bette Davis (spotted while doing research for the Stanley Ann post):

Manly names for women were all the rage [in Hollywood movies] in 1941: Hedy Lamarr was a Johnny and a Marvin that year, and the eponymous heroines of Frank Borzage’s Seven Sweethearts were called Victor, Albert, Reggie, Peter, Billie, George, and most outrageous of all, Cornelius.

Speaking of Cornelius…some comedy from John Oliver‘s 2008 special Terrifying Times:

[A] friend of mine emailed me and he said that someone had created a Wikipedia entry about me. I didn’t realize this was true, so I looked it up. And like most Wikipedia entries, it came with some flamboyant surprises, not least amongst them my name. Because in it it said my name was John Cornelius Oliver. Now my middle name is not Cornelius because I did not die in 1752. But obviously, I want it to be. Cornelius is an incredible name. And that’s when it hit me — the way the world is now, fiction has become more attractive than fact. That is why Wikipedia is such a vital resource. It’s a way of us completely rewriting our history to give our children and our children’s children a much better history to grow up with.

From Piper Laurie‘s 2011 memoir Learning to Live Out Loud:

It never occurred to me that I didn’t have to change my name. For the last twenty or thirty years, I’ve admired and envied all the performers who have proudly used their real names. The longer and harder to pronounce, the better.

(Was Mädchen Amick one of the performers she had in mind? They worked together on Twin Peaks in the early 1990s…)

From a New York Times interview with Lisa Spira of Ethnic Technologies, a company that uses personal names to predict ethnicity:

Can you give an example of how your company’s software works?

Let’s hypothetically take the name of an American: Yeimary Moran. We see the common name Mary inside her first name, but unlike the name Rosemary, for example, we know that the letter string “eimary” is Hispanic. Her surname could be Irish or Hispanic. So then we look at where our Yeimary Moran lives, which is Miami. From our software, we discover that her neighborhood is more Hispanic than Irish. Customer testing and feedback show that our software is over 90 percent accurate in most ethnicities, so we can safely deduce that this Yeimary Moran is Hispanic.

From Duncan McLaren’s Evelyn Waugh website, an interesting fact about the English writer and his first wife, also named Evelyn:

Although I call the couple he- and she-Evelyn in my book, Alexander [Evelyn Waugh’s grandson] has mentioned that at the time [late 1920s] they were called Hevelyn and Shevelyn.

(Evelyn Waugh’s first name was pronounced EEV-lyn, so I imagine “Hevelyn” was HEEV-lyn and “Shevelyn” SHEEV-lyn.)

Want more name-related quotes? Here is the name quotes category.


The Woman Who Buys This Shirt – How Old Is She?

A few days before last week’s road trip, I went shopping. I didn’t find much, but I did spot this shirt while wandering aimlessly around Forever 21:

shirt from forever 21

The shirt says:

I (heart)
Brad
Dave
Sam
Ryan

What caught my eye specifically, beyond the fact that it’s a product with names on it, was the inclusion of the name Dave.

Names used in marketing (or on products themselves, as in this case) can give you a lot of information about the type of customer a company is targeting. A commercial featuring people named Madison and Tyler, for instance, is aimed at a different demographic than one featuring Debra and Gary, or Camila and Diego.

To me, Dave seems a bit old for the teens and 20-somethings shopping at Forever 21.

Here’s why:

forever-21-graph

The graph above indicates how many babies were named Bradley, David, Samuel, and Ryan from 1950 to 2000.

David was a top-10 boy name from the mid-1930s until the early 1990s, but it was really big pre-1970. It was the #1 boy name in the country in 1960, in fact.

Today’s oldest 20-somethings were born circa 1985. David was still more popular than Bradley, Samuel and Ryan in 1985, but it wasn’t as massively popular the 1980s as it had been in previous decades.

This might not seem like a big deal, but I find it really curious. Someone chose the name Dave for this shirt instead of Josh, or Matt, or Justin. Why?

There may not be an answer, but after doing some research, I’m wondering whether the choice of Dave wasn’t intentional. Here’s what I found in a Business Insider article about Forever 21 published a year ago:

Forever 21 is expanding its customer base — Forever 21 is becoming a fashion department store that caters to all members of the family — not just teens.

That means a broader set of customers are being gobbled up by the retailer as it releases new lines targeting men and older demographics. Yet, at its core, Forever 21 still has a similar target as the big teen retailers — 18- to 24-year-olds.

Maybe Dave was included to catch the attention of me and all the other 30-somethings and 40-somethings wandering aimlessly through the store? Hm…

And now the question of the day!

Let’s say you’re in Forever 21 and you see this shirt. And then you see someone — a female — walk up, take it off the rack, and buy it. In your visualization, what age is this person? And why do you think your brain automatically chose that age?

Baby Name Battle – 6 vs. 6

We all know that actors Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie have six kids named Maddox, Zahara, Shiloh, Pax (boy), Knox and Vivienne.

Well, football player Scott Wells and his wife also have six kids now — Jackson, Lola, Kingston, Caroline, Elijah and R.J. (boy).

Which set of six names do you prefer?

I like:

View Results

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Baby Name Story – Jasper Warren

Country singer Brad Paisley and actress Kimberly Williams have two sons.

The first one, William Huckleberry, was named in part for Huck Finn.

But the second one, Jasper Warren, has a name story I like even more. His middle name comes from Brad’s grandfather, the person “who gave [Brad] his first guitar and encouraged him to pursue a music career.”

Very cool tribute. Reminds me of the story behind Kiefer Sutherland’s first name.

Source: The Paisleys Reveal Newborn Son’s Name!

Betting on Celebrity Baby Names – Nicole Kidman & Angelina Jolie

Think you know what Nicole Kidman and Keith Urban will be naming their baby? You can put money on it over at Paddy Power:

Odds
10 to 1
12 to 1
14 to 1
20 to 1
25 to 1
33 to 1
40 to 1
50 to 1
66 to 1
100 to 1
250 to 1
Names
Anthony, Janelle
Nick/Nicholas, Keith
Shannon, Nicole
Robbie/Robert
Jude, Sean, Aoife, Lyle
Edna, Ewan, Beth, Sydney, Russell, Hope, Hugh
Rachel, Nara, Daralis, Brad, Courtney, Dylan
Kevin, Erin, Clyde, Baz, Angelina
Kylie, Virginia, Satine, Perth, London, Holly
Cupid, Jackson, Madonna, Honolulu, Prince, Ireland, Princess
Katie, Suri, Tom, Maverick

And if you think you’ve got the scoop on what Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt will be naming their next baby, you can go make a bet at Bodog:

Odds
5 to 1
9 to 1
10 to 1
11 to 1
12 to 1
13 to 1
15 to 1
20 to 1
30 to 1
Names
Marchelina
Shani
Etta, Gabriel, Sarah, Sari
Salama
Amani, Bradley, Jane
Alvin, Daren
Aaron
William
Jon

Personally, I don’t like the way both betting sites roll two issues — gender and name — into a single question. This forces you to bet on both, and hence you need to get both right to actually win.

Ignoring this sketchiness, though…if you were going to gamble on the baby names above, where would you put your money?

One-Syllable Boy Names – Cruz, George, Nash, Royce, Zane

Like baby names that are short and sweet? Here are over 100 one-syllable boy names:

Ace
Beau, Bo
Ben
Blaine, Blayne, Blane
Blaise, Blaze
Blake
Brad
Brent
Brett
Brock
Brooks
Bruce
Bryce, Brice
Cade
Cale
Carl
Case
Cash
Chad
Chance
Charles
Chase
Chaz
Chris
Clark
Clay
Cole
Colt
Craig
Cruz
Dale
Dane
Dax
Dean
Drake
Drew
Dwayne
Earl
Finn
Floyd
Flynn
Frank
Gage, Gauge
George
Glenn
Graham
Grant
Guy
Hank
Hayes
Heath
Hugh
Jace, Jayce, Jase
Jack
Jake
James
Jax
Jay
Jess
Jett
Joe, Jo
Joel
John, Jon
Josh
Juan
Jude
Kade
Kai
Kale
Kane
Karl
Kash
Keith
King
Knox
Kole
Krish
Kyle
Lance
Lane, Layne, Laine
Lee, Leigh
Lex
Lloyd
Lorne
Luke
Lyle
Mark, Marc
Max
Mike
Moe
Myles, Miles
Nash
Neil
Nick
Noel
Paul
Pierce
Prince
Quinn
Ralph
Ray, Rey
Reece, Reese, Rhys
Reid, Reed
Rex
Rhett
Ross
Roy
Royce
Sam
Saul
Scott
Sean, Shawn, Shaun
Seth
Shane
Steve
Stone
Tate
Todd
Tom, Thom
Trace
Trent
Trey
Tripp
Troy
Ty
Van
Vance
Vaughn
Vince
Wade
Wayne
Will
Zack, Zach, Zac
Zane, Zain, Zayne
Ziv
Zvi

Have any favorites?

P.S. Here are the most popular 1-syllable boy names of 2012, 2011 and 2010.