How popular is the baby name Brodie in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Brodie and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Brodie.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Brodie

Number of Babies Named Brodie

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Brodie

Popular Baby Names in Scotland, 2015

According to provisional data from National Records of Scotland, the most popular baby names in Scotland in 2015 were Emily and Jack.

Here are Scotland’s projected top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2015:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Emily
2. Sophie
3. Olivia
4. Isla
5. Ava
6. Jessica
7. Amelia
8. Ella
9. Lucy
10. Lily
1. Jack
2. Oliver
3. James
4. Lewis
5. Alexander
6. Charlie
7. Logan
8. Lucas
9. Harris
10. Daniel, Finlay & Jacob (3-way tie)

The press release also mentioned that Leo, Brodie, Harrison, Georgia and Rosie were big climbers this year.

But this data only accounts for the first 11 months or so of 2015, so I’ll wait until the finalized data is published (typically in March) before updating this post with more detail.

Until then, here are the top baby names in Scotland for 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010 and 2009.

For more sets of rankings, see the name rankings category, or the UK & Ireland name rankings subcategory.

UPDATE, 3/22/16: Here are Scotland’s finalized rankings for 2015.

Sources: Jack and Emily are Scotland’s top baby names, Baby names: Jack and Emily top Scottish list again

Most Popular Baby Names in Scotland, 2012

The most popular baby names in Scotland were announced last week.

According to the General Register Office, the preliminary winners were Jack for boys and Sophie for girls. Jack has been #1 for five years in a row, and Sophie for eight years in a row.

Here are Scotland’s top 20 girl names and top 20 boy names of January-November, 2012:

Baby Girl Names Baby Boy Names
1. Sophie
2. Emily
3. Olivia
4. Ava
5. Lucy
6. Isla
7. Lily
8. Jessica
9. Amelia
10. Mia
11. Millie
12. Eva
13. Ellie
14. Chloe
15. Freya
16. Sophia
17. Grace
18. Emma
19. Hannah
20. Holly
1. Jack
2. Lewis
3. Riley
4. James
5. Logan
6. Daniel
7. Ethan
8. Harry
9. Alexander
10. Oliver
11. Max
12. Tyler
13. Aaron & Charlie [tie]
15. Adam
16. Finlay
17. Alfie
18. Mason
19. Ryan
20. Liam & Lucas [tie]

Some of the names that increased in popularity from 2011 to 2012:

Lola (up 24 places to #63)
Mollie (up 24 places to #68)
Amelia (up 20 places to #9)
Orla (up 19 places to #36)
Hollie (up 18 places to #39)
Georgia (up 13 places to #58)
Lexi (up 12 places to #38)
Lacey (up 12 places to #41)
Poppy (up 11 places to #34)
Harris (up 20 places to #29)
Harrison (up 20 places to #53)
Tyler (up 20 places to #12)
Brodie (up 17 places to #54)
Max (up 15 places to #11)
Mason (up 13 places to #18)
Finn (up 13 places to #66)
Riley (up 11 places to #3)

New to the top 100 are Bella, Darcy, Emelia, Lois, Scarlett and Willow (for girls) and Alex, Blake, Calvin, George, Olly, Sebastian, Shay and Zac (for boys).

Among the names moving downward are Abigail, Chloe, Jasmine and Phoebe (for girls) and Aiden, Jayden and Mohammed for boys. (Aiden is down 16 places to #36; Jayden down 10 places to #40.)

To compare, here’s last year’s post on the top baby names in Scotland.

Scotland’s official rankings will be out after the year ends.

Sources: Jack and Sophie are Scotland’s top baby names, Jack and Sophie top Scots baby names list in 2012, Scotland’s favourite baby names revealed

Family with 16 Alphabetical Baby Names

You guys seemed to like last week’s big family post, so I’ll try to write more posts like that one in the coming weeks.

Let’s start with the Ginn family of Georgia, circa 1931.

Bowman, Ga., July 14 (AP) – For family nomenclature Mr. and Mrs. John R. Ginn, who live near here, recommend the alphabetical system, especially for a family with 16 children.

Relative ages, they find, are easily called to mind and all element of error is practically eliminated in giving a complete enumeration.

Their children are named as follows: Brodie, Corbin, Dorcas, Elmira, Fezzan, Gregor, Hassie, Ithmar, Jessie, Kester, Lisbon, Manson, Nelson, Ornice, Pascal and Quaver.

In 1900, according to the Census, the Ginns had just one child. By 1910, they had 8. And in 1920, 14.

Which of the 16 names do you like best?

And, if you could complete the set — add 10 names, one that starts with A, the rest starting with R through Z — which names would you choose?

Source: “Alphabetical System Used to Name Children.” Reading Eagle 14 Jul. 1931: 7.

Bad Baby Name Definitions at

“I do not think it means what you think it means.” This is a line from The Princess Bride, spoken by a character named Inigo Montoya. I think of it whenever I come across a bad baby name definition. And I’ve been thinking of it a lot lately.

Why? Because I’ve visited a few times since my LOL post, and their database is riddled with errors. While I was there, I saw name definitions that were inaccurate, outdated, theoretical (but presented as fact), embellished, fabricated, and just poorly written. Here are some examples:

Brody/Brodie is indeed Scottish. And Brodie is indeed the name of a Scottish castle. But “Name of a Scottish Castle” is not a definition. The actual definition of Brodie is uncertain, though a number of possible meanings have been proposed.

Caleb is Hebrew and likely means “dog.” So where the heck did “rage” come from? This made me think of Rage Against the Machine when I first saw it. Maybe the meaning should be “Rage Like a Dog Against the Machine.” I mean, if you’re going to embellish, might as well go all out.

“Full of Goodness”? Come on, Declan isn’t a breakfast cereal. It’s an Irish name of uncertain origin. Hence, the meaning is unknown. “Full of Goodness” is made-up. Delicious-sounding, but made-up.

Diego“Short Form of San Diego” is the best they could do? Really? And the cryptic “San Diego is St. James of Santiago” only makes things worse. One theory holds that Diego can be traced back (via Santiago, via Sanctus Iacobus) to St. James, but it’s not a conclusive link. has been around since 1996. This means they’ve had 14 years to spiff up their database. So why haven’t they? (Yes, founder/CEO Jennifer Moss, this question is for you.)