How popular is the baby name Bunny in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Bunny and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Bunny.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Bunny

Number of Babies Named Bunny

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Bunny

“What’s My Line?” Baby Names

television, 1950s, game show, whats my line
Sunee Parker, men’s barber
What’s My Line? (1950-1967) was one of the longest-running game shows on television — not to mention one of the earliest.

The word “line” in the title didn’t refer to a line of script, but to a line of work. Essentially, the show consisted of four celebrity panelists trying to guess a contestant’s occupation — typically something unexpected, e.g., “lipstick demonstrator,” “makes kilts,” “vaccinates chickens.”

Given the popularity of the show, and the fact that contestants’ names were emphasized (each one signed in on a chalkboard at the start of his/her segment), it’s not surprising that some of the more unusual contestant names ended up influencing U.S. baby names. For example…

Rondi
Contestant Rondi Stratton, whose job was demonstrating mattresses in store windows, was on the show in October of 1952. The baby name Rondi saw increased usage in 1952-1953.

Barbi
Contestant Barbi Nierenberg, who was a maternity dress buyer, was on the show in November of 1952. The baby name Barbi debuted in the data in 1953. (Barbie dolls weren’t launched until 1959.)

Wynelle
Contestant Wynelle Davis, who was a fireworks seller, was on the show in June of 1953. The baby name Wynelle saw an uptick in usage the same year.

Sunee
Contestant Sunee Parker, who was a men’s barber, was on the show in October of 1953. The baby name Sunee debuted in the data the same year.

television, 1950s, game show, whats my line
Rozana Ruehrmund, bill collector
Rozana
Contestant Rozana Ruehrmund, who was a bill collector, was on the show in August of 1954. The baby name Rozana debuted in the data the same year.

Zana
Contestant Zana Stanley, who handled bad checks at a District Attorney’s office, was on the show in November of 1954. The baby name Zana saw an uptick in usage the same year.

Lili
Contestant Lili Lisande Wieland, who was a Christmas shopper at Saks Fifth Avenue, was on the show in December of 1954. The baby name Lili saw increased usage the same year.

Thor
Contestant Thor Thors, who was the Icelandic ambassador to the United States, was on the show in November of 1955. The baby name Thor saw an uptick in usage the same year.

Evonne
Contestant Evonne Gaines, who owned a dog grooming salon, was on the show in March of 1957. The baby name Evonne saw increased usage the same year.

Bunny
Contestant Bunny Yeager, who was a “cheesecake photographer,” was on the show in July of 1957. The baby name Bunny saw increased usage the same year. (Bunny, born Linnea Eleanor Yeager, was a former pin-up model herself.)

Darris
Contestant Darris Miller (f), who made one-piece pajamas for dogs, was on the show in August of 1959. The baby name Darris saw an uptick in usage the same year.

Perian
Contestant Perian Conerly, who wrote a football column for newspapers, was on the show in December of 1959. The baby name Perian debuted in the data the next year. (Her growing visibility as a columnist may have been an influence here as well.)

Sherrylyn
Contestant Sherrylyn Patecell, who was a Rockette — not to mention the recently elected Miss New York City — was on the show in July of 1960. The baby name Sherrylyn debuted in the data the same year. (Her pageant win may be a confounding factor here.)

LaVelda
Contestant LaVelda Rowe and her identical twin sister LaVona Rowe, both news photographers, were on the show in July of 1960. The baby name LaVelda was a one-hit wonder in the data the same year.

television, 1950s, game show, whats my line
Sita Arora, English teacher
Sita
Contestant Sita Arora, who was a high school English teacher originally from Bombay, was on the show in September of 1960. The baby name Sita debuted in the data the same year.

Dorinda
Contestant Dorinda Nicholson, who taught hula dancing, was on the show in August of 1962. The baby name Dorinda saw an uptick in usage the same year.

Candi
Contestant Candi Brasovan, who was a salami seller, was on the show in January of 1963. The baby name Candi saw increased usage the same year.

Sheva
Contestant Sheva Rapoport, who was a dentist, was on the show in February of 1966. The baby name Sheva debuted in the data the same year.

…And here are some other interesting What’s My Line? contestant names. These didn’t influence the data, but they caught my eye nonetheless.

  • 1952: Regife
  • 1953: Rosebud
  • 1954: An’a, Gudny, Jun, Tala
  • 1955: Edle (pron. “ed-lee”), Kirpal, Relly, Sheréé, Sylvette, Vari, Zarine
  • 1956: Heloisa, Martica, Trema
  • 1957: Benna, Felisa, Gundega, Jolie, Mirella, Reimar, Vondon
  • 1958: Kinlock, Rildia*
  • 1959: Jorunn, Mirja, Rood, Roswitha
  • 1960: Gedney, Jo-ag-quis-ho (Onondaga for “the sun making tracks in the snow”)
  • 1961: Alfena
  • 1962: Alansa
  • 1963: Inter, Meeg
  • 1964: Sura
  • 1965: Brackett, Sua
  • 1966: Rosmare

*Piano teacher Rildia Cliburn was the mother of pianist Harvey Lavan “Van” Cliburn. Her own mother was named Sirrildia.

Other game shows that influenced American baby names include Card Sharks, Jeopardy, and American Gladiators.

Sources: What’s My Line? – TV.com, What’s My Line? – Wikipedia


Name Quotes for the Weekend #26

halle berry quote about her name

From a short item about Halle Berry in a 1995 issue of Jet:

“My mother was shopping in Halle Brothers in Cleveland,” she recently revealed in the New York Daily News. “She saw the bags and thought, ‘That’s what I’m going to name my child.’ I thought it was the coolest name until I got into this business. No one ever says it right, it’s Halle, like Sally.”

From the NOVA video Zeppelin Terror Attack:

On the day that came to be known as “Zep Sunday,” tens of thousands of relieved Londoners picked over the wreckage for souvenirs.

Overnight, pilot William Leefe Robinson became the most famous man in Britain. Babies, flowers and hats were named after him and he was mobbed wherever he went.

Within a month, the technique he perfected for taking out airships had brought down two more. It was the beginning of the end for the zeppelin.

On September 2, 1916, 21-year-old William Leefe Robinson became the first pilot to shoot down a German Zeppelin over Britain. (Several weeks later, a shot-down Zeppelin inspired a British family to name their newborn Zeppelina.)

From an interview with psychologist and baby name writer Albert Mehrabian:

Looking at the psychological health of subjects using my temperament scales and comparing that with the impression given by their names, I found a correlation showing that individuals with less pleasant names exhibited greater psychopathology. It’s a very weak association, but if I were a parent choosing a name for my child, I wouldn’t take a chance at making that association.

From Under the Spell of a Name by Mikita Brottman in the New York Times (found via Appellation Mountain):

I also know a desperately lonely guy who refused to go on a blind date with a woman he met online (who, he had to admit, seemed an uncannily perfect match) because of her name: Bunny.

“If you like her enough, you’ll get over it,” I told him. “You could call her B.”

“I can’t do it,” he said. “I just can’t imagine my name linked with that of someone named Bunny.”

From a funny post about choosing baby names by Robbie Knox (who has a daughter named Kitty):

[A name should not] be the name of a kids’ TV character. This is where we went wrong. If you pick a name similar to a cartoon that has extensive merchandising contracts, people buy you a lot of stuff. We have more Hello Kitty products in our house than the entire teenage population of Japan put together. We’ll be more careful next time when our son Pikachu is born.

From In Our View: Baby names in Utah newspaper The Spectrum:

Hardcore fans of the 1970’s TV show M*A*S*H* will remember the episode when Major Charles Emerson Winchester (the Third) received a letter from his younger sister. The corpsman, who delivered the letter, referenced her as Hon-o-ree-a to which Winchester pompously responded … “It’s Aun-or-ee-a!” No doubt those high-brow Massachusetts Winchesters had all the best intentions when they named the Major’s little sister, but giving a child a name which must be spelled or repeated several times before new acquaintances “get it” is so unfair. There are lots of reasons kids get bullied, but his or her name — or some derivative of it — should not be a cause for learning self-defense.

Want to see more random quotes about names? Check out the name quotes category.

Baby Names for Easter

Easter EggsWe already know about Easter Lily Gates and Mirabella Bunny Adams, but what other Easter babies have been given very holiday-specific baby names?

  • Easter Day Hagans, female, born on April 23, 1916, in Florida.
  • Easter Day, female, born on April 20, 1930, in Kentucky. (Day was her married name, ironically.)
  • Easter Daybreak Mullarkey, female, born on March 29, 1891, in Scotland.
  • Easter Eve Tyrell, female, born April 16, 1892, in Maine.
  • Easter Eve, female, born on April 14, 1661, in England.
  • Easter Sunday Cook, female, born on April 9, 1939, in North Carolina.
  • Easter Sunday Renick, female, born on April 8, 1860, in West Virginia.
  • Easter Sunday Mckinnon, female, born on April 18, 1906, in North Carolina.
  • Bunny Easter Parris, born in 1947 in North Carolina.

Know of any others?

Baby Names from Cockney Rhyming Slang?

Here’s something I’ve never seen before.

Last month, Canadian singer Bryan Adams and his girlfriend welcomed their second baby girl, Lula RosyLea. Lula’s middle name is a reference to her time of birth, as per this tweet by Adams:

Lula Rosylea arrived @ teatime this wk. a cup of ‘rosie lee’ = ‘cup of tea’ in cockney. Lula comes from Gene Vincent’s song Be-Bop-A-Lula

This is the first baby I know of to be named via Cockney rhyming slang.

What’s Cockney rhyming slang? It involves word substitution based on rhyme. Typically, a word in a sentence is replaced with a rhyming phrase, and then the rhyming part of the phrase is dropped. This makes the resulting sentence hard for those not in-the-know to understand.

Here’s an example: “Use your loaf.” It’s really “use your head,” but the phrase loaf of bread was used instead of head, and then loaf of bread was shortened to just loaf. Hence, “use your loaf.” Get it?

Speaking of bread, if you’ve ever heard people use the slang word bread to mean money, that’s CRS too. Money rhymes with the old expression bread and honey, which shortens to bread.

So that’s how Bryan Adams turned tea into Rosie Lee, which is a common CRS rhyme for tea. (And now, if you’re ever in London and someone asks you if you want a cup of Rosie, you’ll know what they’re talking about!) “Rosie Lee” refers to American burlesque performer Gypsy Rose Lee (1911-1970).

I thought this was a rather cool way to come up with a baby name, so I’ve collected a few dozen other well-known CRS rhymes that involve names. On the left you’ll find the original word, in the middle is the name/phrase substitution, and on the right is the shortened version.

  • back – rhymes with Cilla Black – shortens to Cilla
  • ball – rhymes with Albert Hall – shortens to Albert
  • belly – rhymes with Darby Kelly – shortens to Darby
  • brake – rhymes with Veronica Lake – shortens to Veronica
  • cake – rhymes with Sexton Blake – shortens to Sexton
  • coat – rhymes with Billy goat – shortens to Billy
  • curry – rhymes with Ruby Murray – shortens to Ruby (if these parents had had a girl instead of a boy, Ruby would have been a great option)
  • door – rhymes with Rory O’Moore – shortens to Rory
  • fairy – rhymes with Julian Clairy – shortens to Julian
  • fish – rhymes with Lillian Gish – shortens to Lillian
  • gin – rhymes with Anne Boleyn – shortens to Ann
  • gin – rhymes with Vera Lynn – shortens to Vera
  • ice – rhymes with Vincent Price – shortens to Vincent
  • kettle – rhymes with Hansel and Gretel – shortens to Hansel
  • lisp – rhymes with Quentin Crisp – shortens to Quentin
  • mess – rhymes with Elliot Ness – shortens to Elliot
  • neck – rhymes with Gregory Peck – shortens to Gregory
  • old man (father) – rhymes with Peter Pan – shortens to Peter
  • rail – rhymes with Toby Ale – shortens to Toby
  • Stella (brand of beer) – rhymes with Yuri Geller – shortens to Yuri
  • Stella – rhymes with Nelson Mandela – shortens to Nelson
  • table – rhymes with Betty Grable – shortens to Betty
  • tea – rhymes with Bruce Lee – shortens to Bruce
  • tea – rhymes with Kiki Dee – shortens to Kiki
  • tea – rhymes with Rosie Lee – shortens to Rosie
  • telly – rhymes with Liza Minnelli – shortens to Liza (e.g., “What’s on the Liza?”)
  • trouble – rhymes with Barney Rubble – shortens to Barney
  • 2:2 (lower second-class honors) – rhymes with Desmond Tutu – shortens to Desmond
  • undies – rhymes with Eddie Grundies – shortens to Eddie
  • wedding – rhymes with Otis Redding – shortens to Otis

I think Darby (for “belly”) might be an especially tempting one baby namers, no? :)

Bryan’s first baby girl, Mirabella Bunny, was born last Easter.

Sources: @bryanadams, February 14, 2013, Cockney Rhyming Slang

Update, 12/29/16: A reader named Sam recently told me about the Complete Dictionary of Cockney Rhyming Slang, which contains a bunch more names — like Errol Flynn for “chin,” and Euan Blair for “Leicester Square.” Enjoy!

Celebrity Baby Name – Mirabella Bunny

Canadian rocker Bryan Adams recently welcomed his first child, a baby girl named Mirabella Bunny.

According to Adams, Bunny alludes to the baby’s birth date:

I’m really proud to announce on 22 April, Mirabella Bunny was born. She arrived like all good Easter bunnies on Easter Friday.

Call me crazy, but I like this one.

Mirabella is lovely. And it works well with a 2-syllable b-name. The rhythm/consonance of “Mirabella Bunny” immediately reminded me of “Isadora Duncan,” which has always been a favorite name-pairing of mine.

While I’m not a big fan of “Bunny,” I do appreciate that it has special significance in this case. And I’m happy it’s not the first name, but well-hidden in the middle. (Are you listening, Jamie Oliver?)

What do you think?

Source: Bryan Adams Welcomes Daughter Mirabella Bunny