How popular is the baby name Calizza in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Calizza and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Calizza.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Calizza

Number of Babies Named Calizza

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Calizza

Drene, The Shampoo-Inspired Baby Name

The first and only time the baby name Drene made it onto the SSA’s list was 1946:

  • 1947: unlisted
  • 1946: 6 baby girls named Drene [debut]
  • 1945: unlisted

Drene Shampoo The inspiration?

Drene shampoo…kind of.

Drene, the first shampoo to use synthetic detergent instead of soap, had been introduced by Procter & Gamble in 1934. So the product had been on the market for more than a decade by the mid-1940s.

What drew people’s attention to Drene in 1946 specifically, then?

“Drene Time,” a late-night radio variety show sponsored by Procter & Gamble. The 30-minute program, which featured singing and comedy, is where the sketch comedy series The Bickersons (starring Don Ameche and Frances Langford) got its start.

“Drene Time” only lasted from mid-1946 to mid-1947, but that gave it enough time to influence the baby name charts, if only slightly.

Drene shampoo continued to be sold until the 1970s, at which point P&G stopped production in the U.S.

Source: Drene Shampoo, Medium, 3 oz. | National Museum of American History


The Baby Name Velveeta

the baby name velveeta

We may not be able to stop the Cheesepocalypse, but while we’re waiting it out, we can talk about how Velveeta isn’t just a product name — it’s also a baby name! The name Velveeta first appeared on the SSA’s baby name list in the 1950s:

  • 1960: unlisted
  • 1959: 6 baby girls named Velveeta
  • 1958: 5 baby girls named Velveeta
  • 1957: 7 baby girls named Velveeta [debut]
  • 1956: unlisted

These numbers don’t give the full picture, though. Usage of the name (and of the product itself) was highest in the middle of the century, but I’ve found people named Velveeta born as early as the 1930s and as late as the 1980s.

So where does the word “Velveeta” come from?

The product was invented in the late 1910s by Swiss-born cheesemaker Emil Frey. The Kraft-Phenix company (later just Kraft) ended up acquiring the processed cheese spread and naming it “Velveeta” for its velvety consistency.

Velveeta was introduced nationally in the late 1920s, right around the start of the Great Depression. Here’s a Velveeta ad from 1929 telling people about the “delicious new cheese product.”

What do you think of the name Velveeta?

Do you know anyone with the name? How do they like it?

(Other food product baby names I’ve blogged about so far include Calizza, Dijonnaise and Oleomargarine. And, while we’re talking Velveeta, we can’t forget to mention Cheesette.)

Sources: A Cheesy Meltdown: Kraft Warns Of Velveeta Shortage, And it was all yellow
Image: the beast by stumptownpanda

Calizza – Baby Name Inspired by Pizza Hut

The baby name Calizza debuted in the US baby name data in 1986.

Here’s a baby name that might make you hungry: Calizza. It appeared on the SSA’s baby name list in 1986 but never again, making it a true one-hit wonder.

  • 1987: unlisted
  • 1986: 8 baby girls named Calizza [debut]
  • 1985: unlisted

Calizza, like Dijonnaise, can be traced back to a new food product and (more importantly) the associated marketing campaign.

In this case, the food product was Pizza Hut’s Calizza, a six-inch “Italian turnover” on the lunch menu. It came in two varieties: Italian Sausage and Five Cheese. The name “Calizza” was a portmanteau of the words calzone and pizza.

It was introduced nationally in early 1986 with the help of three “wacky, tacky” commercials featuring an Italian mother and son. Here’s one of them:

If you’re curious to try a Calizza, you’re out of luck — Pizza Hut unceremoniously discontinued the Calizza a few years after introducing it. But you could always give this fan-created 3 Cheese Calizza recipe a shot.

Source: “Pizza Hut Introduces Calizza Via Chiat/Day.” Adweek 10 Mar. 1986.

Corelle, the Dishware-Inspired Baby Name

corelle, dish, 1970s, corningDid your family own a set of Corelle?

Corelle dishware was introduced to consumers in 1970 by Corning Glass Works of New York. The product was aimed at middle-class Americans who wanted “a long-desired middle ground between paper plates and good china.”

The original marketing made sure to emphasize that a Corelle dish was translucent “like fine china” and “even rings like fine china.” But Corelle wasn’t fine china — it made from a lightweight, durable tempered glass product called Vitrelle (which was originally intended for first-generation television screens in the 1940s). This made it easy to handle, hard to break, and very affordable.

corelle, cup, 1970s, corningPopular Corelle patterns included Butterfly Gold, Old Towne Blue, Woodland Brown, and the wonderfully retro Spring Blossom Green. Clever hook-handles on the cups not only allowed for compact stacking, but also kept “your husband’s big fingers away from the bowl, so they can’t get burned.”

But enough with the nostalgia…what does all this have to do with baby names? Well, the year after Corelle hit the market, the baby name Corelle appeared in the SSA’s baby name data for the first and only time:

  • 1972: unlisted
  • 1971: 5 baby girls named Corelle [debut]
  • 1970: unlisted

corelle, cups, 1970s, corningThis means that the Corelle marketing campaign not only boosted sales, but also boosted the brand name onto the baby name charts.

And this wasn’t an isolated case — there are many other examples of historical marketing campaigns inspiring American parents to name their babies after brands and products (such as Finesse, Jordache, Calizza, Monchel, L’erin, and dozens of perfumes).

What do you think of the baby name Corelle?

For you, is the association with vintage dishware a pro or a con? ;)

Sources: Corelle.com – History, Here’s why these plates make millions of people nostalgic, History of Stylish and Durable Dishware