How popular is the baby name Carl in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Carl and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Carl.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Carl

Number of Babies Named Carl

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Carl

Popular Baby Names in Denmark, 2016

According to data released by Statistics Denmark, the most popular baby names in the country in 2016 were Sofia and Noah.

Here are Denmark’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Sofia, 480 baby girls
2. Alma, 447
3. Emma, 439
4. Ella, 438
5. Ida, 428
6. Freja, 427
7. Clara, 426
8. Anna, 402
9. Laura, 396
10. Alberte, 386

Boy Names
1. Noah, 538 baby boys
2. Victor, 531
3. Oliver, 523
4. Oscar, 521
5. William, 520
6. Lucas, 509
7. Carl, 483
8. Malthe*, 451
9. Emil, 445
10. Alfred, 433

On the boys’ list, the top 10 remained the same overall, but Noah replaced William in the #1 spot.

On the girls’ list, the #1 name remained the same, but Alberte replaced Isabella in the top 10.

Here are the 2015 rankings, if you’d like to compare.

*Malthe can be traced back to Helmold, a Germanic name meaning “helmet” + “rule.”

Sources: Names of newborn children – Statistics Denmark, Malthe – Behind the Name


Mystery Monday: The Name Carlester

Ready for another mystery baby name? Today we’ve got Carlester, which jumped on and off the SSA’s list (with curious regularity) throughout the ’50s:

  • 1959: 6 baby boys named Carlester
  • 1958: 9 baby boys named Carlester (5 born in Maryland)
  • 1957: unlisted
  • 1956: 9 baby boys named Carlester (5 born in Maryland)
  • 1955: unlisted
  • 1954: 11 baby boys named Carlester
  • 1953: unlisted
  • 1952: 10 baby boys named Carlester [debut]
  • 1951: unlisted

So far, I can’t pinpoint the source.

The name Carlester definitely wasn’t new in 1952 — dozens of people all over the U.S. had been named Carlester prior to the 1950s, going back to at least the late 1800s.

And, contrary to what the SSA data implies, most of the 1950s usage was far to the south of Maryland. In fact, during the first few years of the decade, it looks like most of the usage was in North Carolina specifically. Football player Carlester Crumpler was born in North Carolina in 1951, for instance.

There could be an African-American angle here, but I’ve checked several African-American publications from the time period and haven’t yet spotted a Carlester (or a Carl Ester).

Any idea why the name Carlester started seeing higher usage in the early ’50s?

Ti-Grace, ‘Tit Carl, and T-Rex – Cajun Nicknames

A number of Cajuns have nicknames prefixed with “Tee” “Ti,” “Tit,” “T,” and so forth — all pronounced tee. This prefix is derived from the French word petit, meaning “small” or “little.” It typically denotes a namesake/junior, or else the youngest child in a family.

In a blog post about Cajun French, writer Ramona DeFelice Long noted that “[o]n the bayou, a T-Rex would not be a dinosaur. T-Rex would be a boy named Rex who was named after his father named Rex.”

Linda Barth, author of The Distinctive Book of Redneck Baby Names, compared the prefix to the diminutive suffix -ie and gave the example of ‘Tit Carl as being “sort of the Cajun version” of Carlie.

Speaking of examples…Ti-Grace Atkinson (b. 1938) played a prominent role in the early radical feminist movement. She was born “Grace” in Baton Rouge, but has always gone by “Ti-Grace.” Here’s why:

My mother’s family was from Virginia. I was named for my Grandmother, whom I adored. My father’s family was from Pennsylvania. I kept the “Ti” which is Cajun, and I kept it because I knew I was going to live in the North and I did not want to forget or let anybody else forget that that was part of my heritage.

In the late ’60s and early ’70s, Ti-Grace was mentioned in articles about militant feminism in Life, Newsweek, the New York Times, Esquire, and elsewhere. Though her name never ended up on the SSA’s baby name list, I did find records for two non-Louisiana females born in the early ’70s and named Ti-Grace, thanks to her influence.

Her name came in particularly handy (from her perspective) when she ran away from home as a teenager:

They had hired detectives to find me, but because my first name is so difficult, the detectives kept getting lost. Nobody would ever put it down right, thank God.

Have you ever met someone with a Cajun T- (or Ti-, or Tee-, etc.) nickname?

Sources:

Arrr! Baby Names for Talk Like a Pirate Day

pirate baby

Avast! Did you know that today is Talk Like a Pirate Day?

“Arrr” itself doesn’t make a great name — even for pirates — but here’s the next best thing: over 120 names that feature the “ar”-sound.

Araminta
Arcadia
Arden
Aretha
Aria
Arianna
Arlene
Arlette
Artemis
Barbara
Barbie
Carla
Carlene
Carley
Carmel
Carmella
Carmen
Charlene
Charlotte
Charmaine
Darcy
Daria
Darla
Darlene
Gardenia
Harbor
Harlow
Harmony
Hildegarde
Karla
Katarina
Larisa
Mara
Marcella
Marcia
Margaret
Margot, Margaux
Maria
Mariah
Mariana
Marie
Marina
Mariska
Marissa
Marjorie
Marla
Marlena
Marlene
Marley
Marnie
Marta
Martha
Marva
Martina
Narcissa
Parthenia
Pilar
Rosario
Scarlett
Skylar
Starla
Arcadio
Archer
Archibald
Archie
Ari
Arlo
Arnold
Arsenio
Arthur
Balthazar
Barnaby
Barton
Bernard (…Bernarr?)
Carl
Carlisle
Carlton
Carson
Carter
Carver
Charles
Clark
Dario
Darius
Darwin
Edgar
Edward
Finbar
Garfield
Gerard
Gunnar
Hardy
Harley
Harper
Harvey
Howard
Karl
Lars
Larson
Lazarus
Leonard
Marcel
Marcellus
Mario
Marius
Marc, Mark
Marcus, Markus
Marlow
Marshall
Martin
Marvin
Nazario
Oscar
Parker
Richard
Stewart, Stuart
Ward
Warner
Warren
Warrick
Willard
Yardley

Which of the “ar”-names above do you like best? Did I miss any good ones?

(Image from Pixabay)

Additions, 9/20:

Popular Baby Names in Denmark, 2015

According to data from Statistics Denmark, the most popular baby names in the country in 2015 were Sofia and William.

Here are Denmark’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2015:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Sofia, 555 baby girls
2. Freja, 459
3. Ella, 449
4. Alma, 445
5. Anna, 419
6. Emma, 415
7. Laura, 412
8. Clara, 398
9. Ida, 390
10. Isabella, 388
1. William, 591 baby boys
2. Noah, 543
3. Lucas, 534
4. Emil, 489
5. Oliver, 489
6. Oscar, 480
7. Victor, 478
8. Malthe, 455
9. Alfred, 425
10. Carl, 418

Emma, the former #1 girl name, dropped to 6th place last year. Alma, on the other hand, jumped from 11th to 4th and replaced Karla in the top 10.

On the boys’ side, Alfred (jumping from 17th to 9th) and Carl replaced Frederik and Magnus.

In the top 50, the girl names Gry, Naya, and Silje replaced Alba, Naja, and Malou, and the boy names Jakob, Lauge, Milas, Silas, Theo, Thor, and Viggo replaced Andreas, Bertram, Daniel, Jacob, Jonas, Nikolaj, and Sander.

(Gry means “dawn” in Danish and Norwegian, Silje is a diminutive of Cecilia, and Lauge is based on the Old Norse byname Félagi, meaning “fellow, partner, mate.”)

Here are Denmark’s 2014 rankings.

Sources: Names of newborn children – Statistics Denmark, Top 20 Danish baby names for boys and girls, Lauge – Nordic Names Wiki