How popular is the baby name Carlton in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Carlton and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Carlton.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.


Popularity of the Baby Name Carlton

Number of Babies Named Carlton

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Carlton

Arrr! Baby Names for Talk Like a Pirate Day

pirate baby

Avast! Did you know that today is Talk Like a Pirate Day?

“Arrr” itself doesn’t make a great name — even for pirates — but here’s the next best thing: over 120 names that feature the “ar”-sound.

Araminta
Arcadia
Arden
Aretha
Aria
Arianna
Arlene
Arlette
Artemis
Barbara
Barbie
Carla
Carlene
Carley
Carmel
Carmella
Carmen
Charlene
Charlotte
Charmaine
Darcy
Daria
Darla
Darlene
Gardenia
Harbor
Harlow
Harmony
Hildegarde
Karla
Katarina
Larisa
Mara
Marcella
Marcia
Margaret
Margot, Margaux
Maria
Mariah
Mariana
Marie
Marina
Mariska
Marissa
Marjorie
Marla
Marlena
Marlene
Marley
Marnie
Marta
Martha
Marva
Martina
Narcissa
Parthenia
Pilar
Rosario
Scarlett
Skylar
Starla
Arcadio
Archer
Archibald
Archie
Ari
Arlo
Arnold
Arsenio
Arthur
Balthazar
Barnaby
Barton
Bernard (…Bernarr?)
Carl
Carlisle
Carlton
Carson
Carter
Carver
Charles
Clark
Dario
Darius
Darwin
Edgar
Edward
Finbar
Garfield
Gerard
Gunnar
Hardy
Harley
Harper
Harvey
Howard
Karl
Lars
Larson
Lazarus
Leonard
Marcel
Marcellus
Mario
Marius
Marc, Mark
Marcus, Markus
Marlow
Marshall
Martin
Marvin
Nazario
Oscar
Parker
Richard
Stewart, Stuart
Ward
Warner
Warren
Warrick
Willard
Yardley

Which of the “ar”-names above do you like best? Did I miss any good ones?

(Image from Pixabay)

Additions, 9/20:


California “Parental Naming Rights” Bill Stalls Out

The aim of California’s Assembly Bill No. 2528, which was introduced Assemblymember Nancy Skinner in early 2014, was to force the state to add diacritical marks to birth certificates and other state-issued identity documents:

From the text of the bill:

This bill would require the State Registrar to ensure that diacritical marks on English letters are properly recorded on all certificates of live birth, fetal death, or death, and all marriage licenses, including, but not limited to, accents, tildes, graves, umlauts, and cedillas.

The bill was supported by many, including Professor Carlton F. W. Larson of UC Davis School of Law, who wrote about the constitutional dimensions of parental naming rights back in early 2011.

But the bill stalled out in April of this year.

Why? Money:

As Skinner’s bill progressed through the assembly it came time for different agencies to chime in with estimates on the cost of updating their systems. The final tally: $10m. “Coming out of the recession, when an agency or department put the cost on a bill that was their way of trying to prevent action from being taken,” Skinner said. “We’ve pushed through some of that, but there is still resistance. I questioned how much it would really cost.”

“Updating their systems”? What is this, 1989?

Skinner is no longer in the California State Assembly, but I hope someone reintroduces this issue soon.

Sources: California birth certificates and accents: O’Connor alright, Ramón and José is not, Professor Larson Testifies for California Assembly on Parental Naming Rights

The Baby Name Sedona

the baby name sedona

The Arizona city of Sedona was named after the first postmaser’s wife — but only because all the other names he’d submitted to the U.S. Post Office Department got rejected.

The wife in question is Sedona Arabella Miller, born in Missouri in 1877. She pronounced her name “see-dona” and went by the nicknames Donie (as a kid) and Dona (as an adult).

Sedona was the only one in her family with an unusual name; her siblings included Lillie, Edna, Minnie, Noah, and Edward. Her mother said simply, “I liked the sound of it.” It is possible that she had heard the Creole name Sedonie, used among free women of color in the South.

[Sedonie is probably a variant of Sidonie, which is a French feminine form of the Latin name Sidonius, which means “of Sidon.” Sidon was an ancient Phoenician city-state.]

Sedona married Theodore Carlton “T.C.” Schnebly on her 20th birthday, and in 1901 she and T.C. moved to Arizona with their two young children.

Not long after they arrived, T.C. decided the settlement needed a post office, so he applied for a post office name. But all the names he sent in — Schnebly Station, Red Rock Crossing, Oak Creek Station — were rejected, as they were too long to fit on the cancellation stamp beside “Arizona Territory.”

Finally, at the suggestion of his brother, T.C. tried his wife’s name. The relatively short “Sedona” was approved. By mid-1902, T.C. had the Sedona post office up and running “in the back of the Schnebly home.”

*

So the baby name Sedona existed before the city did, but it’s never been popular enough to rank in the U.S. top 1,000.

Here’s how many U.S. babies have been named Sedona since the year 2000:

  • 2013: 38 baby girls named Sedona (7 in AZ)
  • 2012: 55 baby girls named Sedona (9 in AZ, 9 in CA)
  • 2011: 51 baby girls named Sedona (6 in AZ, 7 in CA)
  • 2010: 60 baby girls named Sedona (8 in AZ, 12 in CA)
  • 2009: 69 baby girls named Sedona (8 in AZ, 11 in CA)
  • 2008: 91 baby girls named Sedona (18 in AZ, 11 in CA)
  • 2007: 75 baby girls named Sedona (17 in AZ, 7 in CA)
  • 2006: 76 baby girls named Sedona (14 in AZ, 8 in CA)
  • 2005: 58 baby girls named Sedona (6 in AZ, 9 in CA)
  • 2004: 77 baby girls named Sedona (12 in AZ, 10 in CA)
  • 2003: 66 baby girls named Sedona (16 in AZ, 10 in CA)
  • 2002: 76 baby girls named Sedona (14 in AZ, 7 in CA)
  • 2001: 62 baby girls named Sedona (12 in AZ, 9 in CA)
  • 2000: 69 baby girls named Sedona (8 in AZ, 10 in CA)

Baby names that coincide with city names tend to be less popular among locals (i.e., Brooklyn and Madison are less popular among New Yorkers and Wisconsinites, respectively) but that’s not the case for Sedona.

Of the 923 baby girls named Sedona since the turn of the century, 155 (17%) were born in Arizona, making Arizona the state with the most Sedonas.

In second place is California with 120 Sedonas (13%). In third is Texas with 24 Sedonas (3%).

Arizona’s numbers are even more impressive when you consider that both California and Texas welcome several times as many babies as Arizona does per year.

Sources:

[This post was inspired by an Eponymia post about Arizona names.]

Names With the Word “Car”

If you’re looking for a car name — or you’re a car-lover looking for a baby name — here’s a logical list for you: names that contain the word “car.”

  • Cara, Carra
  • Caramia
  • Cardea
  • Caren, Carin, Caron, Caryn, Karen
  • Carey, Cari, Carie, Carrie, Carrie, Cary
  • Caridad
  • Carina
  • Carissa, Carisa
  • Carl
  • Carla
  • Carleen, Carlene
  • Carlee, Carleigh, Carley, Carli, Carlie, Carly
  • Carlissa, Carlisa
  • Carlisle, Carlyle
  • Carlo
  • Carlos
  • Carlota, Carlotta
  • Carlton, Carleton
  • Carlyn, Carlynn
  • Carmel, Carmela, Carmella, Carmelo, Carmello
  • Carmen
  • Carmine
  • Carol, Carole, Carrol, Carroll, Caryl
  • Carolann
  • Carolee
  • Carolina
  • Caroline, Carolyne
  • Carolyn, Carolynn
  • Carsen, Carson
  • Carsten
  • Carter
  • Carver
  • Charisma, Carisma
  • Encarnacion
  • Giancarlo
  • Karma, Carma
  • Macario, Macarius, Macaria
  • MacArthur
  • Oscar
  • Ricardo, Ricarda
  • Scarlett, Scarlet
  • Toccara

Want to see more names for cars?

Number-Names Illegal in Illinois, New Jersey, Texas

What luck! I posted a question about Wisconsin state law and how it pertains to baby names several days ago. Today, I discovered a legal paper called “Naming Baby: The Constitutional Dimensions of Parental Naming Rights” by Carlton F. W. Larson of UC Davis School of Law. Apparently it was published the same day as the post.

Larson says that many U.S. states have laws about baby names, and that “[t]he most typical restrictions are prohibitions on obscenities, numerals, pictograms, diacritical marks or overly lengthy names.” He discusses each of these areas in detail, but since my original question had to do with numbers, I’ll stick to that.

Spelled-out numbers (like Seven) seem to be allowed everywhere, but the use of numerals (like 7) is restricted in some states, including New Jersey, Illinois and Texas:

  • New Jersey “permits the State Registrar to reject names that contain “numerals” or a “combination of letters, numerals, or symbols.””
  • Illinois “prohibits numerals when used as the first character in a child’s name.”
  • Texas “prohibits numerals as part of the name or suffix, although Roman numerals may be used for suffixes.”

The paper is fascinating. (And I can’t get over the timeliness!) I’ll have to comb through for all the state-specific details and organize them here, so that we can use the list as a reference.

Source: Naming Baby: The Constitutional Dimensions of Parental Naming Rights, via Larson on Baby Names, Free Speech, and Substantive Due Process