How popular is the baby name Caroline in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Caroline.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Caroline


Posts that Mention the Name Caroline

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: C (Part 2)

Looking for a rare girl name with a retro feel? Here are dozens of ideas, all from very old films (1910s-1940s).

The names below are the second half of the C-list (Ci- to Cy-). The first half has the Ca- to Ch- names.

Enjoy!

Cicely
Cicely was a character name in multiple films, including The Hoyden’s Awakening (1913) and Next Time We Love (1936).

  • Usage of the baby name Cicely.

Cicily
Cicily was a character name in multiple films, including The Cat Creeps (1930) and The Cat and the Canary (1939).

  • Usage of the baby name Cicily.

Ciel
Ciel was a character played by actress Evelyn Dumo in the film The Black Butterfly (1916).

  • Usage of the baby name Ciel.

Ciglia
Ciglia was a character played by actress Camilla Horn in the film Eternal Love (1929).

Cina
Cina Burton was a character played by actress Julia Swayne Gordon in the short film The Troublesome Step-Daughter (1912).

  • Usage of the baby name Cina.

Cinders
Cinders was a character played by actress Marie Doro in the film Lost and Won (1917).

Cissie
Cissie was a character name in multiple films, including Twinkletoes (1926) and Experiment Perilous (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Cissie.

Cissy
Cissy Fitzgerald was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in England in 1873. Her birth name was Marie Kathleen Kipping. Cissy was also a character name in multiple films, including Just Cissy’s Little Way (short, 1913) and Sunny Side Up (1926).

  • Usage of the baby name Cissy.

Citronella
Citronella Dedough was a character played by actress Ethel Teare in the short film Ham the Detective (1915).

Clairette
Clairette Montieth was a character played by actress Linda Arvidson in the short film A Fair Rebel (1914).

Clarabell
Clarabell Brooks was a character played by actress Betty Furness in the film The 3 Wise Guys (1936).

Clarabella
Clarabella was a character played by actress Ona Munson in the film Wild Geese Calling (1941).

Clarabelle
Clarabelle was a character name in multiple films, including Keystone Hotel (1935) and George White’s Scandals (1945).

Clarette
Clarette Clare was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s.

Claribel
Claribel was a character name in multiple films, including The Magic Bon Bons (1915) and Strike Me Pink (1936).

Claribell
Claribell Lotsadough was a character played by actress Gale Henry in the film Marble Heads (1917).

Clarice
Clarice was a character name in multiple films, including A Question of Identity (1914) and The Family Upstairs (1926).

Clarine
Clarine Seymour was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in New York in 1898.

Clarita
Clarita was a character name in multiple films, including The Ruling Passion (1910) and Three Keys (1925).

Clary
Clary was a character name in multiple films, including Bar 20 Rides Again (1935) and The Law West of Tombstone (1938).

  • Usage of the baby name Clary.

Claudette
Claudette Colbert was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1960s. She was born in France in 1903. Claudette was also a character played by actress Glenda Farrell in the film Traveling Saleslady (1935).

Claudine
Claudine was a character name in multiple films, including The Nut (1921) and Fifth Avenue (1926).

Clelia
Clelia Matania was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1980s. She was born in England in 1918.

  • Usage of the baby name Clelia.

Clelie
Clelie Gordon was a character played by actress Fredi Washington in the film Ouanga (1936).

Clemency
Clemency Warlock was a character played by actress Kay Francis in the film Cynara (1932).

Clementina
Clementina was a character name in multiple films, including The Glory of Clementina (1922) and The Desert Song (1929).

Cleone
Cleone Meredith was a character played by various actresses (like Madge Stuart and Elissa Landi) in various films called The Amateur Gentleman, all based on the novel of the same name by Jeffrey Farnol.

Cleopatra
Cleopatra was a character name in multiple films, including Cleopatra – Queen of Egypt (1912) and Oh! Oh! Cleopatra (1931).

Click
“Click” Stewart was a character played by actress Glenda Farrell in the film Exposed (1938).

Clo-clo
Clo-Clo was a character played by actress Margo in the film The Leopard Man (1943).

Clodah
Clodah Harrison was a character played by actress Dorothy Cumming in the film The Female (1924).

Clorinda
Clorinda was a character name in multiple films, including The Lifted Veil (1917) and A Lady of Quality (1924).

Clothilde
Clothilde was a character name in multiple films, including The Breath of Araby (1915) and The Count of Monte Cristo (1934).

Clotilda
Clotilda was a character played by actress Louise Beavers in the film Kisses for Breakfast (1941).

Clotilde
Clotilde de Marelle was a character played by actress Angela Lansbury in the film The Private Affairs of Bel Ami (1947).

Cluny
Cluny Brown was a character played by actress Jennifer Jones in the film Cluny Brown (1946).

Clyne
Clyne Dacia was an actress who appeared in 1 film in 1922.

Clytemnestra
Clytemnestra was a character played by actress Helen Kelly in the film M’Liss (1918).

Clytie
Clytie was a character name in multiple films, including The Danger Game (1918) and The Heart Line (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Clytie.

Cobina
Cobina Wright was an actress who appeared in films in the 1940s. She was born in New York in 1921.

  • Usage of the baby name Cobina (which debuted in the data in 1939).

Colomba
Colomba was a character played by actress Eily Malyon in the film The White Angel (1936).

Columbine
Columbine was a character name in multiple films, including A Harlequinade Let Loose (1912) and The Tidal Wave (1920).

Comfort
Comfort was a character played by actress Mary Boland in the film The Pursuit of Happiness (1934).

Concha
Concha was a character name in multiple films, including The Canyon of Light (1926) and The Devil Is a Woman (1935).

  • Usage of the baby name Concha.

Conchita
Conchita Montenegro was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1940s. She was born in Spain in 1911. Her birth name was Concepción Andrés Picado. Conchita was also a character name in multiple films, including A Branded Soul (1917) and Border Romance (1929).

Concordia
Concordia Selander was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Sweden in 1861.

Connaught
Connaught O’Brien was a character played by actress June Collyer in the film Hangman’s House (1928).

Connemara
Connemara Moore was a character played by actress Marie Prevost in the film Bobbed Hair (1925).

Constantia
Constantia was a character name in multiple films, including The Conquest of Constantia (1915) and Little Lord Fauntleroy (1936).

Constantina
Constantina Ivaneska was a character played by actress Tala Birell in the film The Power of the Whistler (1945).

Consuelo
Consuelo was a character played by actress Norma Shearer in the film He Who Gets Slapped (1924).

Cordova
Cordova was a character played by actress Mona Barrie in the film When a Girl’s Beautiful (1947).

Corie
Corie was a character played by actress Nydia Westman in the film Two Alone (1934).

  • Usage of the baby name Corie.

Corinna
Corinna Mura was an actress who appeared in films from the 1940s to the 1950s. She was born in 1909. Corinna was also a character played by actress Jacqueline Logan in the film The House of Youth (1924).

Corliss
Corliss Palmer was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1930s. She was born in Georgia in 1902. Corliss was also a character played by actress Gloria Grey in the film Unknown Dangers (1926).

Cornelia
Cornelia was a character name in multiple films, including Drugged Waters (1916) and Cover Girl (1944).

Corunna
Corunna was a character played by actress Louise Platt in the film Captain Caution (1940).

Creola
Creola was a character played by actress Lillian Yarbo in the film Wives Under Suspicion (1938).

  • Usage of the baby name Creola.

Creota
Creota was a character played by actress Rose Dione in the film It Happened in Paris (1919).

Cressy
Cressy was a character played by actress Blanche Sweet in the film Fighting Cressy (1919).

Cristobella
Cristobella was a character played by actress Anna Demetrio in the film Born to Be Wild (1938).

Croessa
Croessa was a character played by actress Gina Marangoni in the film Cabiria (1914).

Croisine
Croisine Bouhouhorts was a character played by Edith Barrett in the film The Song of Bernadette (1943).

Cuca
Cuca was a character played by actress Armida in the film Fiesta (1941).

  • Usage of the baby name Cuca.

Curly
Curly Flagg was a character played by actress Miriam Hopkins in the film She Loves Me Not (1934).

  • Usage of the baby name Curly.

Cyd
Cyd Charisse was an actress who appeared in films from the 1940s to the 1970s. She was born in Texas in 1922. Her birth name Tula Ellice Finklea.

  • Usage of the baby name Cyd.

Cymba
Cymba Roget was a character played by actress Helen Gardner in the film The Sleep of Cymba Roget (1920).

Cynthy
Cynthy was a character played by actress Peggy Hyland in the film The Rebellious Bride (1919).

Cyprienne
Cyprienne Marcey was a character played by actress Billie Burke in the film Let’s Get a Divorce (1918).

Cyrilla
Cyrilla Drew was a character played by actress Caroline Cooke in the film Roses of Yesterday (1913).

Which of the above do you like best?

Numerology & Baby Names: Number 5

baby names that add up to 5, numerologically

Here are hundreds of baby names that have a numerological value of “5.”

I’ve sub-categorized them by overall totals, because I think that some of the intermediate numbers could have special significance to people as well.

Within each group, I’ve listed up to ten of the most popular “5” names per gender (according to the current U.S. rankings).

Beneath all the names are some ways you could interpret the numerological value of “5,” including descriptions from two different numerological systems.

5 via 14

The following baby names add up to 14, which reduces to five (1+4=5).

  • “14” girl names: Ida, Adah, Caia, Becca, Dia, Adi, Abbi, Ala, Edda, Kc
  • “14” boy names: Ahad, Adi, Kc, Dj, Dade, Jd, Jac, Bach, Dee, Acai

5 via 23

The following baby names add up to 23, which reduces to five (2+3=5).

  • “23” girl names: Mia, Alia, Cara, Aila, Adela, Addie, Edie, Laia, Jaci, Mai
  • “23” boy names: Caleb, Adem, Acen, Coda, Han, Adael, Cane, Emad, Mj, Aadhi

5 via 32

The following baby names add up to 32, which reduces to five (3+2=5).

  • “32” girl names: Emma, Bella, Lena, Sage, Eve, Avah, Lara, Rhea, Veda, Giana
  • “32” boy names: Leo, Lane, Reed, Sage, Dash, Aldo, Avi, Leif, Jakai, Elan

5 via 41

The following baby names add up to 41, which reduces to five (4+1=5).

  • “41” girl names: Amelia, Abigail, Isla, Amaya, Adelaide, Evie, Mira, Jayda, Dream, Saige
  • “41” boy names: Amir, King, Nico, Elian, Alijah, Duke, Clay, Kye, Madden, Jadiel

5 via 50

The following baby names add up to 50, which reduces to five (5+0=5).

  • “50” girl names: Sofia, Adeline, Lyla, Kayla, Elise, Mariah, June, Elsie, Haven, Lexi
  • “50” boy names: Ezra, Paul, Colt, Brady, Marco, Frank, Kasen, Drew, Landen, Donald

5 via 59

The following baby names add up to 59, which reduces to five (5+9=14; 1+4=5).

  • “59” girl names: Kaylee, Melanie, Brianna, Briella, Kendall, Makenna, Carly, Renata, Janelle, Lillie
  • “59” boy names: Jayden, Jason, Ismael, Zaiden, Bowen, Jonas, Mohamed, Rayan, Zaire, Kellen

5 via 68

The following baby names add up to 68, which reduces to five (6+8=14; 1+4=5).

  • “68” girl names: Olivia, Sophia, Valeria, Juliana, Morgan, Blakely, Izabella, Madeleine, Cataleya, Kaydence
  • “68” boy names: Benjamin, Brandon, Carlos, Kyrie, Zander, Killian, Ricardo, Eduardo, Cruz, Derrick

5 via 77

The following baby names add up to 77, which reduces to five (7+7=14; 1+4=5).

  • “77” girl names: Caroline, Samantha, Vivian, Alyssa, Molly, Juliet, Harlow, Kelsey, Coraline, Braelyn
  • “77” boy names: Jameson, Ryker, Ashton, Kenneth, Kameron, Fernando, Braylen, Scott, Marvin, Fletcher

5 via 86

The following baby names add up to 86, which reduces to five (8+6=14; 1+4=5).

  • “86” girl names: Skylar, Jordyn, Mckenzie, Paisleigh, Hunter, Saoirse, Alyson, Ellison, Bryleigh, Julianne
  • “86” boy names: Hunter, Santiago, Arthur, Johnny, Cyrus, Rodrigo, Tommy, Terry, Skylar, Jordyn

5 via 95

The following baby names add up to 95, which reduces to five (9+5=14; 1+4=5).

  • “95” girl names: Kinsley, Peyton, Kimberly, Bristol, Promise, Joslyn, Rowyn, Brynnlee, Yvonne, Estefany
  • “95” boy names: Everett, Peyton, Gregory, Huxley, Wesson, Viktor, Abdulrahman, Yousif, Hussein, Summit

5 via 104

The following baby names add up to 104, which reduces to five (1+0+4=5).

  • “104” girl names: Yaretzi, Tinsley, Rosalyn, Whitney, Sterling, Violetta, Emmylou, Huntleigh, Jesslyn, Giulietta
  • “104” boy names: Sterling, Marcellus, Quintin, Braxtyn, Truett, Shaquille, Michelangelo, Sebastion, Trevyn, Weylyn

5 via 113

The following baby names add up to 113, which reduces to five (1+1+3=5).

  • “113” girl names: Roselyne, Primrose, Brittney, Constanza, Sumayyah, Emersynn, Tziporah, Ivyrose, Augustina, Anavictoria
  • “113” boy names: Salvatore, Cristofer, Woodrow, Bryston, Alexandros, Jaxstyn, Greysyn, Athanasius, Braxston, Antonius

5 via 122

The following baby names add up to 122, which reduces to five (1+2+2=5).

  • “122” girl names: Roselynn, Zerenity, Krislynn, Rosslyn, Chrislynn, Scotlynn, Jacquelynn, Marylynn, Kaytlynn, Sincerity
  • “122” boy names: Chukwuemeka, Righteous, Dimitrius, Ebubechukwu, Xzayvian, Antavious, Kenechukwu, Ayomiposi, Joanthony, Stetsyn

5 via 131

The following baby names add up to 131, which reduces to five (1+3+1=5).

  • “131” girl names: Brookelynn, Brooklynne, Monserrath, Kerrington, Roosevelt, Temiloluwa, Oluwaseun, Amythyst
  • “131” boy names: Cristopher, Roosevelt, Wellington, Hutchinson, Maximillion, Tryston, Imisioluwa, Christoper, Temiloluwa

5 via 140

The following baby names add up to 140, which reduces to five (1+4+0=5).

  • “140” girl names: Marymargaret, Summerlyn, Marycatherine, Evelynrose, Maryevelyn, Quinnlynn, Testimony, Violetrose
  • “140” boy names: Dontavious, Markanthony, Fitzwilliam, Prometheus

5 via 149

The boy name Montavious adds up to 149, which reduces to five (1+4+9=14; 1+4=5).

What Does “5” Mean?

First, we’ll look at the significance assigned to “5” by two different numerological sources. Second, and more importantly, ask yourself if “5” or any of the intermediate numbers above have any special significance to you.

Numerological Attributes

“5” (the pentad) according to the Pythagoreans:

  • “They called the pentad ‘lack of strife,’ not only because aether, the fifth element, which is set apart on its own, remains unchanging, while there is strife and change among the things under it, from the moon to the Earth, but also because the primary two different and dissimilar kinds of number, even and odd, are as it were reconciled and knitted together by the pentad”
  • “The pentad is the first number to encompass the specific identity of all number[s], since it encompasses 2, the first even number, and 3, the first odd number. Hence it is called ‘marriage,’ since it is formed of male and female.”
  • “The pentad is highly expressive of justice, and justice comprehends all the other virtues […] it is a kind of justice, on the analogy of a weighing instrument.” (i.e., It is the central number in the row of numbers from 1 to 9.)
  • “Because it levels out inequality, they call it ‘Providence’ and ‘justice’ (division, as it were) […] Likewise, it is called ‘nuptial’ and ‘androgyny’ and ‘demigod’ – the latter not only because it is half of ten, which is divine, but also because in its special diagram it is assigned the central place. And it is called ‘twin’ because it divides in two the decad, which is otherwise indivisible […] and ‘heart-like’ because of the analogy of the heart being assigned the center in living creatures.”
  • “Nature separated each of the extremities of our bodily part (I mean, the extremities of our feet and hands) in a five-fold way, into fingers and toes.”

“5” according to Edgar Cayce:

  • “Five – a change imminent, ever, in the activities of whatever influence with which it may be associated” (reading 261-14).
  • “Five – as seen, a change” (reading 5751-1).
  • “Five always active – and double the two, and one – or three and two, which it is the sum of. Hence, as is questioned here, no factor is more active than would be that of a five…in any activity. Five being the active number” (reading 137-119).
Personal/Cultural Significance

Does “5” — or do any of the other numbers above (e.g., 23, 50, 77, 131) — have any special significance to you?

Think about your own preferences and personal experiences: lucky numbers, birth dates, music, sports, and so on. Maybe you like how “23” reminds you of chromosomes and genetics, for example.

Also think about associations you may have picked up from your culture, your religion, or society in general.

If you have any interesting insights about the number 5, or any of the other numbers above, please leave a comment!

Source: Theologumena Arithmeticae, attributed to Iamblichus (c.250-c.330).

Name Quotes 76: Haechan, Frieda, Taz

From a Fodor’s article about the German gummy factory Haribo Fabrikverkauf:

At first glance it may seem like the milchbären (milk bears) are simply traditional German gummy bears with a milky jacket slapped on the back. However, not only are the flavors slightly different — including lemon, orange, cherry, strawberry, apple, and raspberry — but these bears have actual names. This fruity, creamy crew includes Emma, Emil, Anton, Mia, Ben, and Frieda.

From a Life article (Jan. 18, 1943) about actor and comedian Zero Mostel:

Back in 1941 Zero was a struggling New York painter who specialized in portraits of strong-muscled workmen. He went by the name of Sam, which was his own (“Zero” is a press agent’s inspiration). […] On Feb. 16, 1942, the day that news of the fall of Singapore reached the U.S., “Zero” Mostel made his professional debut as a night-club funny man.

From the Seattle Times obituary of Hildegarde:

Hildegarde, the “incomparable” cabaret singer whose career spanned almost seven decades and who was credited with starting the single-name vogue among entertainers, has died. She was 99.

From a Tribune India article about cyclone names:

Mala, Helen, Nargis and Nilofer may sound like the names of yesteryear Bollywood actors, but they are, in fact, lethal cyclones that have brought violent winds, heavy rain and wreaked destruction.

As Cyclone Fani pounded the Odisha coast on Friday, the name, which was suggested by Bangladesh, also evoked curiosity.

Mritunjay Mohapatra, the additional director general of the India Meteorological Department (IMD), said Fani, pronounced as ‘Foni’, means a snake’s hood.

From a Teen Vogue interview with Zendaya, who explains how her name is pronounced:

Zendaya decided to break it down for viewers with a simple step-by-step guide: “Zen is the first syllable, then day, and then a.”

“I think a lot of people see my name and think it’s more fancy than it is,” she explained. “They think Zendaya like papaya. It’s just day.

From a WWI-era New York Herald article (May 7, 1918) called “Six Get Permission to Change Names”:

Frederick Michael Knopp, an orchestra leader, disliked his Teutonic sounding name and permission was granted him to change it to Blondell.

Another German name was eliminated by the grave of Justice Guy, who permitted Leon Mendelson, a dental student, to call himself Leon Delson.

Believing that Malcolm Sumner sounded better than Malcolm Sundheimer, the latter applied for and received permission to assume the more euphonious name.

From an AP News article about a baby deer named after a K-pop star:

Fans of the K-pop group NCT 127 donated money in January to name a baby pudu at the Los Angeles Zoo after one of its members, Haechan (HECH’-ehn). This week, the human Haechan got to meet his namesake, snapping selfies with the little deer at his enclosure.

From a BBC article about the danger of female-voiced AI assistants:

AI-powered voice assistants with female voices are perpetuating harmful gender biases, according to a UN study.

These female helpers are portrayed as “obliging and eager to please”, reinforcing the idea that women are “subservient”, it finds.

Particularly worrying, it says, is how they often give “deflecting, lacklustre or apologetic responses” to insults.

From a write-up of Demi Moore‘s 2017 Tonight Show appearance:

“[Demi Lovato is] from Texas and I’m from New Mexico, so our families say our names the same but we each individually pronounce it differently,” Moore said, noting she pronounces it “Deh-mee” while Lovato says “Dem-ee.”

So what are the origins of Moore’s name?

“In my case, my mother just found it on a cosmetic carton,” she told Fallon. “It means ‘half,’ and she didn’t know that, but she just liked it.”

From a Wired article called “Pixar Reinvents Big Hair for Brave“:

So in 2009 Chung’s team designed a new simulator named Taz, after the wild Looney Tunes character. It forms individual coils [of hair] around computer-generated cylinders of varying lengths and diameters. The resulting locks stretch out when Merida runs but snap back into place as soon as she stops.

From the 2013 book Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1896–2013 by Trina Robbins:

[A] male pseudonym seemed to be required for action strips, starting with Caroline Sexton who, in 1934, signed “C. M. Sexton” to Luke and Duke. From Cecilia Paddock Munson, who often signed her work either “Pad” or “Paddock Munson,” to Ramona “Pat” Patenaude, to Dale Messick and Tarpe Mills, the women of the 1940s seemed to believe at least in part upon having a male name.

From a Scottish dad who recently named his son Lucifer:

“I looked it up. Our first child born four years ago was going to be called Lucifer but she was a girl so we called her Lucy.

“I wasn’t too sure about Lucifer but eventually said, ‘I want this name’. It would have been even better if he was born on Halloween.”

(I’m actually more concerned about the similarity of the sibset Lucy/Lucifer than about the repercussions of Lucifer itself. Is that weird?)

For more name-related quotes, check out the name quotes category.

Baby Names Given a Boost by Grace Kelly

grace kelly, 1950s

Philadelphia native Grace Kelly appeared in her first movie in 1951. By 1955, she had become one of the biggest box-office draws in the nation. But she gave up her career as an actress to assume the role of a princess in 1956 when she married the ruler of Monaco.

I know of five baby names (so far) that got a boost thanks to Grace Kelly…

Grace

First thing’s first: Grace Kelly’s first name, Grace. It saw a two-year uptick in the mid-’50s:

  • 1959: 1,660 baby girls named Grace [rank: 204th]
  • 1958: 1,708 baby girls named Grace [rank: 198th]
  • 1957: 1,917 baby girls named Grace [rank: 186th]
  • 1956: 1,837 baby girls named Grace [rank: 189th]
  • 1955: 1,390 baby girls named Grace [rank: 216th]
  • 1954: 1,410 baby girls named Grace [rank: 213th]

Decades later, it would peak in the rankings at 13th place for two years in a row (2003 and 2004).

Kelly

The rise of Kelly can’t be attributed to a single factor, as we saw yesterday. That said, I have no doubt that Grace Kelly played a part in feminizing the first name Kelly during the 1950s:

  • 1959: 6,379 baby girls named Kelly [rank: 74th]
  • 1958: 4,471 baby girls named Kelly [rank: 108th]
  • 1957: 1,907 baby girls named Kelly [rank: 187th]
  • 1956: 831 baby girls named Kelly [rank: 310th]
  • 1955: 540 baby girls named Kelly [rank: 380th]
  • 1954: 455 baby girls named Kelly [rank: 406th]

Grace Kelly’s paternal grandparents were Irish immigrants. The Irish surname Kelly can have several possible origins, but a common one is the Ó Ceallaigh, “descendant of Ceallach.” The meaning of the personal name Ceallach isn’t known for certain — some sources say “bright-headed,” others say it comes from a word meaning “war,” or a different word meaning “church.”

In 1968, the name Kelly saw peak usage on the boys’ list (97th) and then-peak usage on the girls’ list (12th). In 1977, thanks to the Charlie’s Angels character, it bounced back to reach an even higher peak for girls (10th).

Lizanne

Grace’s little sister Elizabeth “Lizanne” Kelly married Donald LeVine in Philadelphia in June of 1955. The same year, the baby name Lizanne debuted on the charts:

  • 1959: 32 baby girls named Lizanne
    • 10 born in Pennsylvania
  • 1958: 39 baby girls named Lizanne [peak]
    • 13 born in Pennsylvania
  • 1957: 36 baby girls named Lizanne
    • 10 born in Pennsylvania
  • 1956: 32 baby girls named Lizanne
    • 9 born in Pennsylvania
  • 1955: 15 baby girls named Lizanne [debut]
  • 1954: unlisted

Notice how the usage of Lizanne in the late ’50s was particularly high in Pennsylvania. It was the same through most of the ’60s as well.

Rainier

Grace married Rainier III, the Prince of Monaco, in a lavish wedding in Monaco in April of 1956. The same year, the baby name Rainier debuted on the charts:

  • 1959: unlisted
  • 1958: unlisted
  • 1957: 7 baby boys named Rainier
  • 1956: 11 baby boys named Rainier [debut]
  • 1955: unlisted
  • 1954: unlisted

The name Rainier is ultimately based on the Germanic words ragin, meaning “advice, decision, counsel,” and hari, meaning “army.”

(The six bridesmaids at the wedding were named Bettina, Carolyn, Judith, Maree, Rita — actress Rita Gam — and Sally.)

Caroline

Grace and Rainier had three children: Caroline, Albert, and Stephanie. The births of the latter two didn’t seem to have an effect on U.S. baby names, but the birth of Caroline in January of 1957 did give Caroline a bump that year:

  • 1959: 1,046 baby girls named Caroline [rank: 273rd]
  • 1958: 990 baby girls named Caroline [rank: 282nd]
  • 1957: 1,135 baby girls named Caroline [rank: 253rd]
  • 1956: 702 baby girls named Caroline [rank: 329th]
  • 1955: 743 baby girls named Caroline [rank: 315th]
  • 1954: 770 baby girls named Caroline [rank: 304th]

Toward the end of 1957, John and Jacqueline Kennedy — who were still several years away from becoming President and First Lady — also welcomed a daughter named Caroline. They didn’t get the idea from Grace Kelly, though. Caroline Kennedy was named after her maternal aunt, Caroline Lee Radziwill.

Sources: Top Ten Money Making Stars Poll – Wikipedia, Rayner – Behind the Name