How popular is the baby name Cassidy in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Cassidy and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Cassidy.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Cassidy

Number of Babies Named Cassidy

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Cassidy

Name Quotes for the Weekend, #3

From Barbara of the blog Sewing on the Edge:

I have started teaching a new course this month and am learning the names on a new class list.

My biggest challenge is, as always, the curse of the creative speller.

If your name is Megan why is it spelled Mheghaan?

Why is Cassidy, Kasidee?

Why is Britanny now Brit-anee?

Judy is Joodee?

I have taught Tifani’s, Tiffany, Tifanee all in the same class.

It makes my head explode.

Listen I have a last name that requires spelling out every time I say it, and over time that is a nuisance. Why send your child out in the world with that handicap over what is an ordinary name? Why have teachers say “you’re kidding” every time your kid says what the creative spelling stands for.

If you want your baby to have a cool name choose a cool name. Don’t try to do it with creative spelling. It’s making my class lists a nightmare.

From a Time article about how marketers could learn from baby name trends:

After using a statistical model to study more than 100 years of first names and doing a natural experiment using the names of hurricanes, the researchers found that the popularity of a particular moniker is impacted by how widely the sounds in that name were used previously. In other words, a first grade class filled with Karens is likely to be followed by a wave of six-year-olds with names that use similar sounds, or phonemes, such as “Katie” or “Karl” — or even “Darren” or “Warren.”

From a Slate article about minority births becoming the majority:

The Census Bureau announced Thursday that most of the newborn babies in the United States belong to minority groups, the first time in history that whites of European ancestry have accounted for less than half of that total.

Minorities—including Hispanics, blacks, Asians and those of mixed race—accounted for 50.4 percent of all U.S. births during the 12-month period that ended last July, edging past non-Hispanic whites who made up 49.6 percent.

From Angela of the blog Upswing Baby Names:

These names are still not in the top 1000: Cecily, Clementine, Philippa (or Pippa), Louisa, Linus and Rufus.

From Slate‘s Maurice Sendak obit:

He adored Melville, Mozart, and Mickey Mouse (and would have noted the alliteration with pleasure—he wrote in different places about the mysterious significance he attached to the letter M, his own first initial and that of many of his characters, beginning with Max of Where the Wild Things Are).

Sounds a lot like the Name-Letter Effect.

(Here are quote lists #1 and #2.)


Baby Names Needed for the Twin Sisters of Thomas

A reader named Eva is expecting twin girls and would like some help naming them. She says:

One of the twins should have a unisex first name and a very girly middle name. For the second twin we want a girly first name and unisex middle name.

Here are the names Eva likes so far:

  • Unisex: Avery, Harper, Morgan, Kennedy, Madison
  • Feminine: Anastasia, Michaela, Caroline, Sofia, Kristina

Her husband is only on board with Avery, Caroline, Kristina and Michaela (he prefers the spelling Makayla).

The twins will have an older brother named Thomas Aiden (nn Tommy) and their surname will be similar to Damon.

Eva’s criteria reminded me of the twins named Charlotte and Dylan I wrote about a few years ago. I think the name Charlotte is a good option in this case, but Dylan plus that surname might be D/N-overload. Here are some other possibilities:

Feminine names Unisex names
Adeline
Amelia
Anne/Annie
Bethany
Camille
Cassandra
Cecilia
Cynthia
Esmé
Fiona
Gemma
Genevieve
Hannah
Helena
Julia
Lydia
Lucy
Maria
Melanie
Melissa
Monica
Nicole
Olivia
Phoebe
Rose
Samantha
Sarah
Tabitha
Theresa
Victoria
Addison
Ainsley
Alexis
Bailey
Cameron
Casey
Cassidy
Emery
Finley
Harley
Jamie
Jordan
Kendall
Leigh
Paige
Parker
Piper
Quinn
Reagan
Reese
Riley
Rowan
Sage
Shea
Sidney
Skylar
Tatum
Taylor
Teagan
Willow

Which of the above names do you like best for Tommy’s sisters? What combinations (either unisex+feminine or feminine+unisex) sound best together, do you think?

Here are a few combinations I like, just to kick things off:

  • Unisex+Feminine: Avery Helena, Cameron Nicole, Riley Caroline
  • Feminine+Unisex: Amelia Quinn, Olivia Willow, Victoria Leigh

Baby Name Needed – Boy or Girl Name for Aspen’s Sibling

A reader named Kendra, who has a daughter named Aspen, is now expecting a second baby (gender unknown). She’d like the baby’s first name to:

  • Be “different yet familiar”
  • Be easy to spell
  • Start with something other than A, K or M
  • End with something other than A or N

She’d like the middle name to start with J. Current favorites for the middle spot are Jacob, Johnmichael (a family name), Jenai and Jane.

For first names, I think occupational and locational names would be a good place to start:

Bailey
Carter
Chase
Cooper
Finley
Fisher
Fletcher
Harper
Hunter
Marley
Parker
Piper
Presley
Ridley
Ripley
Roscoe
Ryder
Sawyer
Slater
Tanner
Tatum
Taylor
Tucker
Turner
Thatcher
Tyler
Wesley

They are rooted in the physical (as Aspen is), but they won’t lock Kendra into noun-names (as names like Sage or Willow would). Most are also theoretically gender-neutral — again, like Aspen — though in real life they tend to be used for either one gender or the other.

These names also came to mind:

  • Bryce, Cody, Cole, Max, Rory, Royce, Ryker, and Ulysses for boys,
  • Carley, Chloe, Daphne, and Heidi for girls, and
  • Cassidy and Emery for either boys or girls.

(Daphne does refer to another kind of tree, but the connection is subtle, so I think it would be all right with Aspen.)

It’s tricky to suggest middle names without a definitive first name in place. I do really like Johnmichael and Jane, though. I also thought Kendra might find Jonah, Jett or Jude appealing, as they became fashionable (as first names) right around the same time Aspen did.

Do you like any of the above names? What others would you suggest?

Update – The baby is here! Scroll down to see what name Kendra chose.

Baby Name Needed – Masculine Name for Baby #3

A reader named Courteney is expecting her third baby and needs help with a name:

I love male names–really surnames for both male and female. I don’t like traditional but then again I don’t want it to SCREAM like we are trying to be different. Our other two girls are named Cadien and Killian. The middle name will be Wade no matter the sex.

This is a tricky one. Courteney’s daughters have very similar names…so should she stick to the pattern, or go with something entirely different?

I don’t know the answer, so I came up with two groups of suggestions. Names in the first group resemble Cadien and Killian:

Camden
Cameron
Carlin
Carlisle
Carson
Cassidy
Clancy
Colby
Connolly
Corbin
Cordell
Corrigan
Coventry
Keaton
Kendall
Kennedy*

Names in the second group are similar to Cadien and Killian in terms of style, but not (as much) in terms of sound:

Ainsley
Avery
Brody
Dawson
Devin
Donovan
Emerson
Finngan
Fallon
Harper
Langdon
Murphy
Quinlan
Paxton
Ramsey
Ridley
Rowan
Vaughn

Any of the above sound particularly good next to Cadien and Killian (and in front of Wade)? What other names can you think of?

*I heard from Courteney not long after I posted this…turns out Kennedy is already in use as Cadien’s middle name.

Baby Name Needed – Name for Tanner’s Little Sister

A reader named Greg wrote to me a few days ago. He’s expecting his second child — a daughter — in a matter of months, and would like some name suggestions. He says:

We have a 1-year old son named Tanner, and we are very happy with his name. It’s easy to spell, uncommon but not weird, and sounds a little modern without being too trendy.

Here are some ideas I had:

Aubrey
Audrey
Bailey
Bella
Cassidy
Cleo
Darcy
Ellery
Fiona
Greta
Harper
Jillian
Jordan
Josie
Keely
Lucy
Matilda
Maya
Miranda
Molly
Morgan
Naomi
Paige
Parker
Phoebe
Piper
Quinn
Reese
Ruby
Scarlett
Shelby
Skylar
Stella
Talia
Tessa
Willow

Do you think any of the above sound particularly good with Tanner? Are there any other name suggestions you would offer Greg?