How popular is the baby name Cedric in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Cedric.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Cedric


Posts that Mention the Name Cedric

Babies Named for Sailing Ships (C)

The people below were born aboard — and named after! — ships with C-names…

  • Caduceus:
    • John Caduceus Mason, born in 1869
    • Pauline Caduceus Pyne, born in 1871
    • Amy Caduceus Ward, born in 1871
  • Calabria:
    • Sarah Elizabeth Calabria Marsden, born in 1874
  • Caledonia:
    • William Caledonia Lowe, born in 1870
    • Jane Caledonia Morrison, born in 1870
    • James Caledonia Terrie, born in 1871
    • Muhelina Caledonia Cardone, born in 1888
  • California:
    • Craig California McGinley, born in 1872
    • Sarah California Boettcher, born in 1877
  • Calliance:
    • William James Calliance Potter, born in 1861
  • Cambodia:
    • Mary Cambodia Pocock, born in 1884
    • Ellen Cambodia Goldthorp, born in 1884
    • Emma Cambodia Gascoigne, born in 1884
  • Cambria:
    • Cambria Wallace Milne, born in 1880
  • Cambrian:
    • Henry Cambrian Bouchier, born in 1863
  • Camorta:
    • John Camorta Bleney, born in 1882
  • Camperdown:
    • Ellen Duncan Camperdown Woods, born in 1876
  • Canada:
    • Amelia Canada Scrivens, born in 1857
    • Mary Canada Furlong, born in 1883
  • Canara:
    • Canara Iunatum, born in 1880
  • Canterbury:
    • Canterbury C. Purdon, born in 1863
  • Cardigan Castle:
    • Cardigan Petersen, born in 1873
  • Carisbrooke Castle:
    • Ellen Carisbrooke Haslett, born in 1875
    • Phoebe Carisbrooke Fleming, born in 1875
  • Carnatic:
    • Elizabeth Ann Carnatic Bowler, born in 1873
    • Agnes Carnatic Keen, born in 1875
    • Maria Carnatic Gauser, born in1880
    • Amy Carnatic Collins, born in 1880
    • David Carnatic Robinson, born in 1880
  • Carrick Castle:
    • Carrick Beatrix Hagerty, born in 1874
  • Cartrale:
    • Arthur Taylor Cartrale Smith, born in 1874
  • Cartsburn:
    • M. B. Cartsburn Watt, born in 1874
    • Cartsburn Baxter, born in 1874
    • A. C. Cartsburn Sloan, born in 1874
  • Caspian:
    • William Caspian Downham, born in 1877
  • Castalia:
    • Castalia Marchesa, born in 1879
  • Catalonia:
    • Gurnod Catalonius Sjoberg, born in 1886
  • Cedric The Saxon:
    • Frank Cedric McNair, born in 1885
  • Cephalonia:
    • Cephalonia Charles Jones, born in 1883
    • Henrietta Cephalonia Colman, born in 1885
    • Cephalonia Brook, born in 1886
  • Ceylon:
    • Archie Ceylon Randle, born in 1885
  • Chalmers:
    • Henry Richard Chalmers Charles Bainton, born in 1859
  • Charles Cox:
    • Carlotta Graham Cox, born in 1878
  • Charlwood:
    • Bertram Charlwood Hiscocks, born in 1881
  • Cheops:
    • Cheops Garthwaite, born in 1874
  • Chimborazo:
    • Daniel Chimborazo Dineen, born in 1879
  • China:
    • George China Ward, born in 1876
  • Chollerton:
    • Robert Chollerton Shepherd, born in 1887
    • Ellen Chollerton Blackwell, born in 1887
    • Gertrude Chollerton Archer, born in 1887
  • Christian McAusland:
    • William Taylor McAusland Nelson, born in 1875
  • Chyebassa:
    • Chyebassa Best, born in 1881
    • Chybasse Pettitgean, born in 1884
    • Godfrey Chyebassa Svensson, born in 1885
    • Chyebassa Lowe, born in 1887
  • Cilla:
    • Cillarius Gustav Guttinger, born in 1865
  • Circassia:
    • Circassia Wray Barrett, born in 1880
  • Cissy:
    • Cisseillia Naughton, born in 1867
  • City of Agra:
    • Marie Florence Agra Tyrell, born in 1876
    • Samson Agra Hay, born in 1877
  • City of Auckland:
    • Jane Auckland Pearce, born in 1872
    • Harry Auckland Wood, born in 1872
  • City of Baltimore:
    • Charlotte Baltimore Hadfield, born in 1856
  • City of Benares:
    • Fanny Benares Casson, born in 1874
  • City of Berlin:
    • James Berlin Felix Gerola, born in 1881
    • Adelaide Berlina Mathews, born in 1881
  • City of Brussels:
    • Timothy Brussels Hogan, born in 1880
    • Charles Brussels Arthur, born in 1880
  • City of Chester:
    • Wilhilmene Lewis Chester Andersson, born in 1887
  • City of Durham:
    • Patrick Durham Hickey, born in 1868
  • City of Montreal:
    • Fanny Lund Montreal Massey, born in 1881
  • City of Nankin:
    • Christina Nankin McLean, born in 1880
  • City of Rome:
    • Rose Roma Monro Colman, born in 1884
    • Romulus Johnson, born in 1884
    • Kate Roma Oliver, born in 1885
  • Clairellen:
    • Clairellen Ada Shepherd, born in 1873
  • Clara:
    • Deliela Clara Wright, born in 1875
  • Clara Mærsk:
    • Clara (surname unknown), born in 1975
  • Clarence:
    • Fanny Clarence Murray, born in 1861
    • Eliza Clarence Cox, born in 1861
  • Claverhouse:
    • Frank Claverhouse Parsons, born in 1879
  • Clio:
    • Charles Clio Greening, born in 1856
  • Clyde:
    • Veronica Clyde Gray, born in 1876
    • Richard Clyde Bordlace, born in 1878
    • George Clyde Baker, born in 1878
    • Louisa Teasdel Clyde Lancaster, born in 1879
    • Agnes Clyde Robertson, born in 1879
    • Alice Maria Clyde Crup, born in 1881
    • Venezia Clyde Mackenzie, born in 1884
  • Collingrove:
    • Isabelle Hope Collingrove Benson, born in 1870
  • Columbia:
    • Nora Columbia Needham, born in 1861
  • Colombo:
    • Robert Colombo Sharp, born in 1885
  • Colorado:
    • Colorado Harris, born in 1868
  • Compta:
    • Rose Compta August Kerutz, born in 1881
    • James Compta Burrows, born in 1882
  • Copenhagen:
    • Copenhagen G. Williams, born in 1862
  • Corean:
    • Corea Catherine Cosgrove, born in 1888
  • Corinthian:
    • Corinthian Macnicol McAtee, born in 1880
  • Corlic:
    • Minnie Corlic Collins, born in 1874
  • Coromandel:
    • Nellie Coromandel Brookes, born in 1880
  • Cotopaxi:
    • Herminia Angela Cotopaxi Shertzer, born in 1886
  • Countess Of Galloway:
    • Galloway Nicholson, born in 1878
  • Countess of Kintore:
    • Thomas Kintore Buer, born in 1871
  • Countess of Seafield:
    • Catherine Horton Seafield Danvers, born in 1864
  • Crusader:
    • Robert Alexander Crusader Rodgers, born in 1879
  • Cuba:
    • Rosetta Cuba Burke, born in 1869
  • Culzean:
    • Culzean Pernie Ryan, born in 1874
  • Cuzco:
    • Agnes Cuzco Johnstone, born in 1878
    • John Cuzco Parker, born in 1883
    • James Ridler Cuzco Hartley, born in 1886
    • Margaret Albany Cuzco Walsh, born in 1888

Do you think any of the ship names above work particularly well as human names?

Source: FamilySearch.org

How Many Babies Were Named After Jodeci?

jodeci, music, baby name, 1990s

We’ve talked about babies named after Bon Jovi, Danity Kane, Roxette, and even Starship. So today let’s look at Jodeci.

In 1990, the four-man R&B group Jodeci was formed by Joel “JoJo” Hailey, Donald “DeVante Swing” DeGrate, Dalvin “Mr. Dalvin” DeGrate, and Cedric “K-Ci” Hailey. The name of the band was pieced together from the jo of JoJo, the de of DeGrate, and the ci of K-Ci.

Jodeci’s first album, the successful Forever My Lady, was released in 1991. Sure enough, that’s the year we start seeing babies named Jodeci:

  • 1996: 29 girls, 13 boys named Jodeci
  • 1995: 32 girls, 15 boys named Jodeci
  • 1994: 19 girls, 23 boys named Jodeci
  • 1993: 33 girls, 29 boys named Jodeci
  • 1992: 77 girls, 94 boys named Jodeci
  • 1991: 13 girls, 12 boys named Jodeci [debut]
  • 1990: unlisted

We also see a steep rise in the usage of DeVante, which was the fastest-rising boy name of 1991:

  • 1994: 852 baby boys named Devante [rank: 309th]
  • 1993: 961 baby boys named Devante [rank: 289th]
  • 1992: 1565 baby boys named Devante [rank: 199th] (peak)
  • 1991: 131 baby boys named Devante [rank: 923rd]
  • 1990: 9 baby boys named Devante

(And the sudden trendiness of DeVante gave big boosts to variant forms like Davante, Dvonte, Devonta, Devonte, Davonte, Davonta, Devontae, Davontae, Devontay, Dvontae, etc.)

And in 1992, Dalvin became the second-fastest-rising boy name:

  • 1994: 143 baby boys named Dalvin [rank: 912th]
  • 1993: 179 baby boys named Dalvin [rank: 789th] (peak)
  • 1992: 132 baby boys named Dalvin [rank: 923rd]
  • 1991: 6 baby boys named Dalvin
  • 1990: 13 baby boys named Dalvin

Jodeci put out a second album in 1993, a third in 1995, then went on hiatus in 1996. After they stopped releasing new material, usage of the name declined.

A related name that was used around this time was K-Ci:

  • 2001: unlisted
  • 2000: 6 boys named K-Ci
  • 1999: 6 boys named K-Ci
  • 1998: 5 boys named K-Ci
  • 1997: unlisted
  • 1996: unlisted
  • 1995: 7 boys named K-Ci [debut]
  • 1994: unlisted

This one was helped along by the band K-Ci & JoJo, formed by two Jodeci members around 1996.

The names Jodeci and K-Ci may be down, but don’t count them out. In about a month, a reality TV show starring K-Ci and JoJo will premiere on TVOne. Also, there’s a talented high school football player out there named Jodeci Mays. (He scored seven touchdowns a couple of weeks ago.) Visibility often leads to usage, so the TV show and/or the athlete could help revive the names, you never know…

Baby Names Needed – Classy, Quirky Names for Twins

A reader named Abbie has four children: Leo Sebastian, Henry Edward, Jasper Alaric, and Eliza Vivienne. She recently learned that she is expecting twins (congrats!) and would like some help coming up with baby names–especially boy names. She writes:

Lucy Matilda and Nora Penelope will be the twins’ names if they are both girls.

We like shorter (two to three syllables) names that are classy and old-fashioned but have a hint of eccentricity and quirkiness to them; we want them to be familiar and accepted but still be unusual enough that they’ll be the only one in their classes.

If it helps, our last name starts with Gold and is two syllables.

The very first name to pop into my head? Amory, which I know from This Side of Paradise. This made me think that other names from Fitzgerald books and stories (written during the 1920s and ’30s) might be names Abbie would like. So I flipped through the Fitzgerald books that I own, then flipped through others that I don’t own (thanks to the magnificent Project Gutenberg), and found:

Abe (Abraham)
Albert
Charlie
Chester
Dexter
Duncan
Nelson
Percy
Roscoe
Warren
Daisy
Edith
Honoria
Lorraine
Lucille
Marion
Marjorie
Rosemary
Stella
Violet

I included girl names, but I don’t think Abbie needs any. (I’m guessing that if only one twin is a girl, she’ll be named either Lucy Matilda or Nora Penelope.)

So let’s concentrate on boy names now. Here are some others that seem both old-fashioned and a bit quirky to me:

Alfred
Arthur
Avery
Bernard
Bertram
Cedric
Dexter
Ernest
Felix
Frederick
Lewis
Milo
Nolan
Owen
Philip
Roland
Rupert
Simon
Stuart
Walter

Out of these, I think my favorites (for the sib set Leo, Henry, Jasper and Eliza) would be Owen, Philip, Simon and Stuart.

Which of the names above do you like best? What other names (firsts, middles, or combinations) would you suggest?

Update – The babies have arrived! To see what their genders/names are, either scroll down through the comments or just click here.

Unique Baby Names from Literature

The was originally the round-up post of a 31-post series on literature names for National Book Month. I’ve since condensed all of those individual posts into this one post.

I picked many of these names because they were either popularized by literature or first used as given names in literature:

Amanda

Amanda is based on the Latin gerundive amanda, which means “she who must be loved.” It was used as a name in Europe starting in the mid-17th century. In literature, Amanda perhaps first appeared in the comedy Love’s Last Shift (1696) by English playwright and actor Colley Cibber (1671-1757).

Amaryllis

Before Amaryllis was a plant, it was a name: Amaryllis was created by the Latin poet Virgil (70-19 BC) for a shepherdess in his pastoral Eclogues. Amaryllis is based on the Latin word amarysso, which means “to sparkle.”

Take ashes, Amaryllis, fetch them forth,
And o’er your head into the running brook
Fling them, nor look behind: with these will
Upon the heart of Daphnis make essay.
(Eclogue VIII)

Amory

Amory Blaine is the main character in This Side of Paradise (1920), the successful debut novel of American writer Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (1896-1940). Many believe that Fitzgerald modeled the wealthy, handsome protagonist after himself (at least in part).

Atticus

Harper Lee‘s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird (1960) features Atticus Finch, respected lawyer and father of the book’s protagonist, Scout. Lee named Atticus after Roman eques Titus Pomponius Atticus.

Belinda

Belinda was a character in The Provok’d Wife (1697), a comedic play written by English architect and dramatist Sir John Vanbrugh (c.1664-1726). Belinda may have been based on the Italian word bella, which means beautiful. It was later used by Alexander Pope in The Rape of the Lock (1712).

Beren

The romance between Beren and Lúthien was first told in prose in The Silmarillion, by writer and Oxford professor John Ronald Reuel Tolkien (1892-1973).

Therefore at the last he yielded his will, and Beren took the hand of Lúthien before the throne of her father.
(The Silmarillion, Chapter 19)

A romantic sidenote: The name Beren is engraved on Tolkien’s gravestone, while Lúthien is on the gravestone belonging to Tolkien’s wife, Edith.

Binx

John Binkerson “Binx” Bolling is the film-obsessed main character of The Moviegoer (1961), a National Book Award-winning novel by American author Walker Percy (1916-1990).

Cedric

Cedric was created by Scottish writer Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) for his novel Ivanhoe, which was written in 1819 but set in the 12th century. The name was probably inspired by that of Cerdic, the legendary founder of the Kingdom of Wessex.

Clarinda

Clarinda was coined by English poet Edmund Spenser (c.1552-1599) in The Faerie Queene.

Goe now, Clarinda, well thy wits aduise,
And all thy forces gather vnto thee;
(The Faerie Queene, Book V, Canto V)

Two centuries later, Robert Burns (1759-1796) addressed several poems to ‘Clarinda.’

Fair Empress of the Poet’s soul,
And Queen of Poetesses;
Clarinda, take this little boon,
This humble pair of glasses:
(Verses To Clarinda)

Cosette

French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885) created the orphan Cosette for his novel Les Misérables (1862).

Les Misérables the musical, which debuted in London in October of 1985, has become one of the most successful musicals in history.

UPDATE: The latest Les Miserables movie comes out Dec. 25, 2012.

Dorian

Dorian Gray, whose portrait ages while Dorian himself does not, was invented by Anglo-Irish writer Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) for the gothic horror novel The Picture of Dorian Gray. Wilde may have borrowed the name from the ancient Hellenic tribe the Dorians.

Dulcinea

Dulcinea del Toboso is a fictional character who’s referred to (but does not appear) in Don Quixote de la Mancha, written by Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616).

Eglantine

Eglantine is another name for sweetbrier, a pink-flowered plant native to Britain and northern Europe. Geoffrey Chaucer (1343-1400) first employed Eglantine as a given name, using it for Madame Eglantine in his Canterbury Tales:

Ther was also a nonne, a prioresse,
That of hir smylyng was ful symple and coy;
Hire gretteste ooth was but by Seinte Loy;
And she was cleped Madame Eglentyne.
(Prologue, lines 118-121)

Geraldine

Geraldine was originally an adjective that referred to Ireland’s FitzGerald dynasty. It was first used as a name by English aristocrat Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey (1517-1547).

Honsdon did first present her to mine yien:
Bright is her hewe, and Geraldine she hight.
(Description and praise of his loue Geraldine.)

Geraldine was later popularized by Samuel Taylor Coleridge‘s poem Christabel.

Yet he who saw this Geraldine,
Had deemed her sure a thing divine.
(Christabel, Part II, Stanza 11)

Holden

Holden Caulfield is the cynical, sensitive teenage protagonist of The Catcher in the Rye (1951), written by reclusive American author J. D. Salinger. Holden also appears in several of Salinger’s short stories. Holden was the second-best fictional character of the 20th century, according to Book magazine.

Imogen

Imogen is the name of the king’s daughter in Shakespeare’s play The Tragedy of Cymbeline, King of Britain (c.1609). The prevailing theory is that Imogen was actually meant to be Innogen — a name based on the Gaelic word inghean, meaning “girl, maiden” or “daughter” — but it was misspelled and the mistake was never corrected.

Jancis

The character of Jancis Beguildy was created by English romantic novelist Mary Webb (1881-1927) for her book Precious Bane (1924). Jancis is a modern blend of the names Jan and Francis.

Kilgore

Kilgore Trout regularly appears in books by Kurt Vonnegut. (And in other books, like phone books.) The character of Kilgore may be based on Theodore Sturgeon, or may be a parody of Vonnegut himself.

Lesley

Lesley is a variant of the name Leslie, which is derived from a Scottish place name. Lesley-with-a-y is interesting because it was first used by Scottish poet Robert Burns (1759-1796) in his poem/song Saw Ye Bonie Lesley (1792).

Thou art a queen, fair Lesley,
Thy subjects, we before thee;
Thou art divine, fair Lesley,
The hearts o’ men adore thee.
(Saw Ye Bonie Lesley, Stanza 3)

Lestat

Lestat de Lioncourt is a character in The Vampire Chronicles, a series of novels by Anne Rice. Rice “thought Lestat was an old Louisiana name.” She learned later that the name she was thinking of was actually Lestan.

Lucasta

Lucasta was first used by English poet Richard Lovelace (1618-1658). It’s a contraction of Lux Casta (Chaste Lucy), Lovalace’s nickname for a woman he’d been courting.

If to be absent were to be
Away from thee;
Or that when I am gone,
You or I were alone;
Then, my Lucasta, might I crave
Pity from blustering wind or swallowing wave.
(To Lucasta, going beyond the Seas)

Miranda

The name Miranda was invented by William Shakespeare (1564-1616) for a character in The Tempest. Miranda is based on the Latin word mirandus, which means “admirable.”

Twelve year since, Miranda, twelve year since,
Thy father was the Duke of Milan and
A prince of power.
(The Tempest, Act 1, Scene II)

Uranus’s small moon Miranda, discovered in 1948, was named after the Shakespearean character.

Mirielle

Mireille is the French title of Provençal poem Mirèio (1859). The poem was written by French writer Frédéric Mistral (1830-1914), who shared the 1904 Nobel Prize for Literature with José Echegaray y Eizaguirre. Mistral probably derived ‘Mirèio’ from the Provençal verb mirar, which means “to admire.”

Orinthia

Orinthia was used by Nobel Prize-winning Irish-British playwright George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) in his play The Apple Cart (1929). In the play, King Magnus refers to his mistress as “Orinthia.” When the mistress discovers that Magnus did not invent the name especially for her, she becomes angry. He responds:

Well, one poet may consecrate a name for another. Orinthia is a name full of magic for me. It could not be that if I had invented it myself. I heard it at a concert of ancient music when I was a child; and I have treasured it ever since.
(The Apple Cart, Interlude)

At that “concert of ancient music,” Magnus must have heard the old English ballad The Pilgrim of Love, which–according to the Catalogue of Ballads at Oxford’s Bodleian Library–begins “Orinthia my béloved, I call in vain…”

Pamela

Pamela was created by English writer Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586) for The Countess of Pembroke’s Arcadia. The name was probably derived from the Greek words pan (all) and meli (honey). A century and a half later, Samuel Richardson‘s first novel–named Pamela in honor of Sidney’s heroine–was published.

Quoyle

Quoyle is the main character in E. Annie Proulx‘s The Shipping News (1993), which won the National Book Award, the Pulitzer Prize, and happens to be one of my favorite books. The novel was inspired by The Ashley Book of Knots, and, aptly, “quoyle” is an Old English spelling of coil.

Selima

The name Selima was first used in literature by English writer and scholar Thomas Gray (1716-1771). He used it as the name of a cat. Neither the name nor the cat were Gray’s inventions, though. Selima the cat had belonged to fellow Englishman and writer Horace Walpole (1717-1797).

Shirley

The male name Shirley became feminized with the 1849 publication of Charlotte Bronte’s novel Shirley. Previously, Shirley had been a surname and, before that, a place name.

She had no Christian name but Shirley: her parents, who had wished to have a son…bestowed on her the same masculine family cognomen they would have bestowed on a boy, if with a boy they had been blessed.
(Shirley, Part 2, Chapter XI)

Sula

The rebellious Sula Peace, who becomes a pariah in her socially conservative Ohio town, is the main character of Toni Morrison‘s novel Sula (1973). Sula may be short for Ursula, a Latin name meaning “little bear.”

Vanessa

Vanessa was invented by Irish author Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) as a pseudonym for his friend (and perhaps lover) Esther Vanhomrigh: “van” comes from Vanhomrigh, and “essa” is based on a pet form of Esther.

While thus Cadenus entertains
Vanessa in exalted strains,
The nymph in sober words intreats
A truce with all sublime conceits.
(Cadenus and Vanessa)

Vanessa was later used as the name of a genus of butterfly.

Wendy

Though Scottish writer J. M. Barrie (1860-1937) didn’t invent the name Wendy, he did popularize it with his character Wendy Darling. For Barrie, the name was inspired by a young acquaintance (the daughter of poet William Henley, 1849-1903), who mispronounced the word friend as “fwendy.”

“What’s your name?” he asked.
“Wendy Moira Angela Darling,” she replied with some satisfaction. “What is your name?”
“Peter Pan.”
(Peter Pan, Chapter 3)

There are many other interesting literature names out there. Did I miss any particularly good ones?