How popular is the baby name Chardonnay in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Chardonnay and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Chardonnay.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Chardonnay

Number of Babies Named Chardonnay

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Chardonnay

Name Quotes #49: Stan, Alessia, Nanu

dido, quote, name, queen, fire

From “Dido: My Son Is Not Named After My Hit Song” at People‘s Celebrity Babies blog:

Dido’s duet with Eminem…”Stan,” [was] a collaboration which she never imagined fans would connect to her son’s moniker.

“Stanley was actually our favorite name, coincidentally both of our favorite names. He could never have been called anything else to be honest,” Dido shares. “I’m so stupid, I didn’t think anyone would make the connection.”

Proud of her choice, Dido jokes the name game in her family is always a fun affair. “It’s fine,” she says of her final decision. “I was named after a crazy queen who threw herself on a fire.”

(Here’s more on Dido’s name.)

From “An Open Letter to Anyone Considering a Unique Name For Their Baby” by Alessia Santoro at PopSugar:

I’m 26 years old and I can probably count on two hands the number of times a person has gotten the pronunciation of my name right on the first go — a surprising minority, considering it has the word “less” right in it. Whenever someone does get it right, my jaw drops, because these moments are few and very far between — I often consider hugging the person for making me feel so normal. But the other 99 percent of the time, people get my name wrong.

From the Kent City Council’s online timeline of the First World War:

Raida Margaret Fanny Collins…was born on the night of an air raid over Newington in September.

Her christening on 4th November 1917 is recorded in the diary of Florence Fitch Palmer, organist at the Church of St Mary the Virgin, Newington.

From the chapter about Clara Louise Burnham in the 1918 book The Women who Make Our Novels by Grant Martin Overton:

The beginning of this capital story [The Opened Shutters] was not with Tide Mill, however, but with the name Thinkright Johnson. Like certain persons whose appearance before Mrs. Burnham’s mind’s eye has compelled her to write about them, this New Englandish appellation gave birth to a book. Thinkright Johnson–Thinkright Johnson; the name haunted Mrs. Burnham for days and weeks, “till I knew that the only way I could have any peace was to write something about him.”

From “A Puppy Called Marvin” by Julie Lasky in the New York Times:

Clara is my 2-year-old Wheaten terrier and one of several dogs in my neighborhood with a name that sounds as if it came from a shuffleboard tournament on a golden-years cruise. Among her pals, Fern is red-nose pit bull, Alfie is (mostly) a black lab and Eleanor is a mix of Bernese mountain dog and poodle.

This pack has led me to conclude that whereas we look back to remote centuries when giving children trendy names like Emma, Sebastian, Julian or Charlotte, we name our dogs after our grandparents.

[…]

This means that future generations of dogs should be prepared to be called the mom-and-dad names of today. Names like Kimberly, Jason and Heather.

From “If it’s forbidden to call a baby Cyanide, should Chardonnay be allowed?” by Charles Moore in The Spectator:

The country nowadays is full of children burdened with grotesque names. Are we to ban them? If you forbid Cyanide, should you permit Chardonnay? A further complication is that the little girl is a twin, and her mother wanted to call her twin brother Preacher. This too Lady Justice King forbade because, although Preacher ‘might not be an objectionable name’, ‘there was considerable benefit for the boy twin to be in the same position as his sister’ and for both to be named, as was proposed, by their half-siblings. We are not told what names the half-siblings want. I do hope it is something kind and simple, like Jack and Jill.

From “France names row: Politician hits back over criticism of daughter’s name” at the BBC:

Rachida Dati reacted angrily after journalist Eric Zemmour criticised her choice of name for seven-year-old daughter Zohra.

He said it was unpatriotic because it did not come from an official list of French Christian names.

[…]

He added: “I consider that by giving Muslim first names, you are refusing to accept the history of France.”

[…]

“Do you find it scandalous to give your mother’s name to your children?” [Rachita Dati] asked, in a vigorous defence of her choice of name.

“I loved my mother. I have a little girl, and I called her after my mother. Like millions of French people do every day.”

From the 2013 book The Lahu Minority in Southwest China: A Response to Ethnic Marginalization on the Frontier by Jianxiong Ma:

When a baby is born, his or her name is decided by the birthday tiled by the twelve zodiac days together with gender, so he or she will normally be named Za Birthday for male or Na Birthday for female. For example, if two babies were born on the rat day (fa ni) and the ox day (nu ni) respectively, if they are boys, their names should be Zafa and Zanu, but if they are girls, their names should be Nafa and Nanu, and so on. […] In general, there are about 45 names that can be used in the village for individual persons, even though the very basic names total 24, twelve days for both male and female members.

(The extra baby names used by the Lahu are essentially replacement names used in case of childhood sickness. These replacement names also follow specific formulas.)

For more name-related quotes, check out the name quotes category.


Talula Does The Hula From Hawaii …Gets a Name Change

Talula Does The Hula From Hawaii — this used to be the actual name of a 9-year-old girl from New Zealand.

She had been so embarrassed by it that she “had refused to tell her friends her name and went simply by “K”.”

Then Judge Rob Murfitt stepped in. While presiding over a custody hearing for the girl, he decided to make her a ward of the court in order to change her name. He wrote in his ruling:

The court is profoundly concerned about the very poor judgment which this child’s parents have shown in choosing this name. It makes a fool of the child and sets her up with a social disability and handicap, unnecessarily.

Thank you, Judge Murfitt. You did the right thing.

Other baby names Judge Murfitt has seen in the NZ Family Court system include:

Cinderella Beauty Blossom (blocked)
Fat Boy (blocked)
Fish and Chips (twins) (blocked)
Hitler (blocked)
Kaos (blocked)
Keenan Got Lucy (blocked)
Midnight Chardonnay (allowed)
Number 16 Bus Shelter (allowed)
O.crnia (changed to Oceania)
Sex Fruit (blocked)
Spiral Cicada (blocked)
Stallion (blocked)
Twisty Poi (blocked)
Violence (allowed)
Yeah Detroit (blocked)

P.S. Yup, New Zealand is also where 4real‘s name was blocked. (Superman was later approved.)

Source: NZ judge orders ‘odd’ name change

Unique Names in Scotland – Atom, Divine-Grace, Olaoluwapolorimi, Rhythm

Yesterday I posted about the top baby names in Scotland for 2007, so today I thought I’d mention some of the unique baby names. :)

Approximately 6,500 baby names were bestowed in Scotland in 2007. Of these, about 1,700 boy names and 2,400 girl names were unique (as in, given to only one child). Here’s a sampling of those unique names:

Boy Names Girl Names
Atom
Brydon-Craig
Crombie
Daood
Eriz
Favour
Gurardass
Heini
Ieuan
Jock
Kurtis-Jae
Loche
Montague
Nader
Olaoluwapolorimi
Promise
Qirui
Ruslan
Stephenjunior
Taliesin
Ubayd
Vithujan
Wesley-Scott
Xabier
Yadgor
Zaineddine
Amberly
Babyjane
Chardonnay
Divine-Grace
Eliska
Fizzah
Gracealexandra
Heaven-Leigh
Irmak
Jasmina
Kiranpreet
Luighsighe
Misty-Blue
Noor-El-Iman
Oluwateniolami
Possum
Queeneffa
Rhythm
Sheignneth
Tianqi
Uxia
VJay
Wezi
Xanthia
Yolwandle
Zalfa

To see more, download the full list directly from the General Registrar Office for Scotland.