How popular is the baby name Cheesette in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Cheesette and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Cheesette.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Cheesette

Number of Babies Named Cheesette

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Cheesette

The Baby Name Velveeta

the baby name velveeta

We may not be able to stop the Cheesepocalypse, but while we’re waiting it out, we can talk about how Velveeta isn’t just a product name — it’s also a baby name! The name Velveeta first appeared on the SSA’s baby name list in the 1950s:

  • 1971: 8 baby girls named Velveeta
  • […]
  • 1966: 5 baby girls named Velveeta
  • […]
  • 1959: 6 baby girls named Velveeta
  • 1958: 5 baby girls named Velveeta
  • 1957: 7 baby girls named Velveeta [debut]

These numbers don’t give the full picture, though. Usage of the name (and of the product itself) was highest in the middle of the century, but I’ve found people named Velveeta born as early as the 1930s and as late as the 1980s.

So where does the word “Velveeta” come from?

The product was invented in the late 1910s by Swiss-born cheesemaker Emil Frey. The Kraft-Phenix company (later just Kraft) ended up acquiring the processed cheese spread and naming it “Velveeta” for its velvety consistency.

Velveeta was introduced nationally in the late 1920s, right around the start of the Great Depression. Here’s a Velveeta ad from 1929 telling people about the “delicious new cheese product.”

What do you think of the name Velveeta?

Do you know anyone with the name? How do they like it?

(Other food product baby names I’ve blogged about so far include Calizza, Dijonnaise and Oleomargarine. And, while we’re talking Velveeta, we can’t forget to mention Cheesette.)

Sources: A Cheesy Meltdown: Kraft Warns Of Velveeta Shortage, And it was all yellow
Image: the beast by stumptownpanda

Can Wiki Be a Girl Name?

This question has been bringing traffic to my blog lately. People seem to be interested in using the Hawaiian word wiki, which means “quick,” as a baby girl name.

Can they use wiki as a girl name? Well, sure they can. If they live in a place that doesn’t have strict laws about baby names. In the U.S., for instance, they can name their baby girl Audrey, Abcde, Brenda, Bandit, Charity, Cheesette, or just about anything else they want.

Should they use it as a girl name, though? Should wiki be used as a baby name at all? I think these questions are a bit more thought-provoking. Let’s try a poll:

Should wiki be used as a baby name?

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Baby Name Story – Cheesette

New Haven Alderwoman Claudette Robinson-Thorpe has four children. The last three are Kenneth, Alvin and Jennifer. The first? Cheesette.

Here’s how Claudette explains Cheesette’s name:

It’s not in a book. It’s something no one else would have. Her father had this gorgeous smile, and they nicknamed him Cheese. And my name ends in ‘ette.’ So I put them together.

Cheese + ette. Cheesette. Thoughts?

Source: Every baby name has a story