How popular is the baby name Christmas in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Christmas and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Christmas.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.


Popularity of the Baby Name Christmas

Number of Babies Named Christmas

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Christmas

Babies Named Thanksgiving

turkeyWe’ve talked about people named Easter, Fourth (of July), Halloween, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year…what about Thanksgiving? I mean, we’ve already met Dr. Happy Thanksgiving, but are there more?

Yes, at least a few dozen more. As you’d expect, nearly all were born in late November. Here are three examples:

The two most recent Thanksgivings I found were both born in the 1990s.


Mexican State Bans Baby Names like Rambo, Robocop

banned baby names in sonora, mexico

On February 10, the Civil Registration Act went into effect in the Mexican state of Sonora (which is right across the border from Arizona).

Article 46 of the act allows local authorities to reject baby names they deem derogatory, discriminatory, defamatory, libelous and meaningless, among other things.

The state also banned 61 specific baby names, and will likely ban more names in the future. All of the banned names came directly from Sonora’s birth registries (meaning that each has been used at least once already).

After doing some digging, I finally found the full list of banned names on a Mexican news site. Here it is:

  1. Aceituno
  2. Aguinaldo
  3. All Power
  4. Anivdelarev
  5. Batman
  6. Beneficia (meaning “benefits”)
  7. Burger King
  8. Cacerolo
  9. Calzón (meaning “panties”)
  10. Caraciola
  11. Caralampio
  12. Cesárea
  13. Cheyenne
  14. Christmas Day
  15. Circuncisión (meaning “circumcision”)
  16. Culebro
  17. Delgadina (meaning “the skinny girl.” It’s from the Mexican folk song “La Delgadina.”)
  18. Diódoro
  19. Email
  20. Escroto (meaning “scrotum”)
  21. Espinaca (meaning “spinach”)
  22. Facebook
  23. Fulanita (meaning “so-and-so” or “what’s-her-name”)
  24. Gordonia
  25. Gorgonio
  26. Harry Potter
  27. Hermione
  28. Hitler
  29. Hurraca
  30. Iluminada
  31. Indio
  32. James Bond
  33. Lady Di
  34. Marciana (meaning “martian”)
  35. Masiosare (meaning “if one should dare,” roughly. It’s from the phrase mas si osare, which is part of the Mexican National Anthem.)
  36. Micheline
  37. Panuncio
  38. Patrocinio (meaning “patronage” or “sponsorship”)
  39. Petronilo
  40. Piritipio
  41. Pocahontas
  42. Pomponio
  43. Privado (meaning “private”)
  44. Procopio
  45. Rambo
  46. Robocop
  47. Rocky
  48. Rolling Stone
  49. Sobeida
  50. Sol de Sonora
  51. Sonora Querida
  52. Telésforo
  53. Terminator
  54. Tránsito (meaning “transit”)
  55. Tremebundo (meaning “terrifying” or “terrible”)
  56. Twitter
  57. Usnavy
  58. Verulo
  59. Virgen (meaning “virgin”)
  60. Yahoo
  61. Zoila Rosa

Some thoughts:

  • Facebook is the legal first name of at least 2 human beings at this point. Amazing.
  • Robocop, I must admit, has been on my “baby names I am dying to find in the wild” list for many years. At last, proof that it exists! Exciting stuff. (Haven’t yet come across any babies named Chucknorris, however. Fingers still crossed on that one.)
  • Hermione? I can see why Sonora would object to “Harry Potter” and “James Bond,” but Hermione by itself (as opposed to “Hermione Granger”) makes no sense. Hermione is a legitimate (and lovely) name that existed long before the Potter books.

What are your thoughts? And, which name on the list above shocked you the most?

Sources: Aceituno, Hermione, Hitler, Facebook, Yahoo y la lista completa de los nombres prohibidos en Sonora, Sonora prohíbe registrar niños con nombres peyorativos, Scrotum, Hitler, Facebook: Mexican state bans outlandish baby names

It’s Christmas, so…Happy Thanksgiving!

I didn’t see this in time to post it on Thanksgiving, so I’ll post it on Christmas instead.

A month ago, Richard Chin of the Pioneer Press interviewed Minnesotans with holiday-inspired names. Most of the names were Christmas-related (Christmas Eve, Mary Christmas, Merry Eve) but the one that caught my eye was Happy Thanksgiving.

How did Dr. Happy Thanksgiving Reynolds, a Minneapolis woman born in 1970, come by her unusual name?

“I was the child of hippies,” Reynolds said. And not just the occasional bell-bottom, bead-wearing hippies, according to Reynolds. They were a hard-core, tofu-making, co-op founding couple who didn’t have a name picked out for their new baby because they believed in letting the universe help choose the name on the day of her birth.

“It was total universe magic time for them,” Reynolds said.

So when the day happened to be Thanksgiving, the universe seemed to be deciding that Reynolds’ first and middle names should be Happy Thanksgiving. The first snowfall of the season also occurred that day, Reynolds said.

“I narrowly missed the name Snow,” she said.

How does Happy Thanksgiving like her name?

Reynolds said her name has been an “unintentional gift.”

She isn’t shy about using her full name in her professional life. After medical school, “I said, ‘You know what, I’m Dr. Happy Thanksgiving Reynolds.’ That’s just who I am.”

She’s gotten job interviews because people want to meet someone named Happy Thanksgiving. “I’m someone you’re not going to forget based on the name,” she said.

I’ve found other people named Thanksgiving — one went by the cute nickname Givie — but Reynolds is the only Happy Thanksgiving I know of.

If you want some holiday-themed names more appropriate for this time of year, check out these posts from last year: Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, Merry Christmas, Christmas Carol, Christmas Tree, Happy New Year.

Source: Her name is Happy Thanksgiving, and she’s not the only one with a holiday handle (via Neatorama)

Kenyan Man Bemoans “Naming Crisis”

Joseph Maina, contributing writer at Kenyan newspaper The Standard, believes his country is in the midst of a “naming crisis.”

It all started like a joke, but our neighbourhood is now inundated with ‘modern’ names like Chavez Mwangi, Honda Otieno, Superman Wafula and World Cup Mutai.

Among the girls, we have Martinas, Tiaras and Princesses; and this has given rise to all manner of hideous permutations.

He also knows of children named Beyonce, Dolly-Parton, Mary Christmas, Timberlake and Tupac.

“The list is growing, and there seems to be no end to this dizzying cocktail of ridiculous christenings.”

Source: Some names are bad jokes

Holiday Baby Name: Christmas Carol

Christmas CarolersWe’ve found people named Christmas Eve, Merry Christmas, and Christmas Day…what about Christmas Carol? Are there any Christmas Carols out there?

Yes, I’ve found a couple dozen people named “Christmas Carol.” Some examples:

  • Christmas Carol Porter (male) was born on December 24, 1872, in Iowa.
  • Christmas Carol Haley (male) was born on December 25, 1891, in Kentucky.
  • Christmas Carol Marshall (female) was born on December 25, 1894, in Indiana.
  • Christmas Carol Smith (female) was born on December 25, 1899, in Colorado.
  • Christmas Carol Miller (female) was born on December 25, 1902, in Indiana.
  • Christmas Carol Adams (female) was born on December 25, 1908, in Utah.

I’ve also come across a handful of people with the surname Carroll who have the first name Christmas.

Holiday Baby Name: Christmas Day

Christmas giftYesterday I listed some people named Christmas Eve. Have there also been people named Christmas Day?

Yup, dozens.

The oldest I’ve spotted is Christmas Day (male) who was christened in March of 1659 in Berkshire, England.

The next-oldest are from the 1700s:

  • Christmas Day (male) christened on June 12, 1711, in London, England
  • Christmas Day (male) christened on December 27, 1762, in Suffolk, England

And there are a bunch in the 1800s, including the following:

  • Samuel Christmas Day (male) born on November 9, 1809 (and christened on December 24, 1809) in London, England
  • Christmas Day Godfrey (male) christened on January 3, 1817, in Norfolk, England
  • William Christmas Day (male) christened December 28, 1820, in Suffolk, England
  • Anna Christmas Day Dye (female) christened on November 11, 1837, in Norfolk, England
  • Christmas Day Jones (male) born circa 1850 in Wales
  • Christmas Day (male) born in December, 1876, in Ohio
  • John Christmas Day (male) born circa 1878 in New Zealand
  • Christmas Day Wagstaff, christened on January 27, 1884, in Essex, England

I haven’t seen anyone named Christmas Day since 1900, though.

More holiday baby names: Merry Christmas, Christmas Eve, Christmas Carol, Christmas Tree, Happy New Year