How popular is the baby name Christos in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Christos and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Christos.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Christos

Number of Babies Named Christos

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Christos

Name Quotes #58: Vesper, Ailsa, Kikkan

"Vesper. I do hope you gave your parents hell for that."

From the 2006 movie Casino Royale, James Bond commenting about Vesper Lynd’s first name:

‘Vesper.’ I do hope you gave your parents hell for that.

About the choosing of Ailsa, the first name of the daughter of gold-medal winning Olympic curler Joe Polo:

Both her parents were curlers, members of a tight-knit sport where an intense reverence for the game tends to bleed over into the players’ personal lives. And so it was only natural that Joe and Kristin Polo decided to name their future daughter Ailsa, after the Scottish island where the granite that makes curling rocks is mined.

About the coining of Kikkan, the first name of gold-medal winning Olympic cross-country skier Kikkan Randall:

After Randall’s birth on Dec. 31, 1982, Ronn wanted to name her Kikki, after Kiki Cutter, the first American skier, male or female, to win a rase in a World Cup event, a slalom in 1968. Deborah preferred Meghan. They compromised on Kikkan.

(Kiki Cutter = Christina “Kiki” Cutter.)

From an article about unusual names by Felicity “Flic” Everett:

When I was eight, I changed my name. Until then, I was called Johanna Louise, because my youthful parents, huge Bob Dylan fans, had named me after his mystical 1966 ballad, Visions of Johanna. In mid-70s south Manchester, sadly, the mysticism was somewhat lost. I hated explaining my name […] and thought it sounded clunky and earthy, when I longed to be ethereal and balletic.

From an essay about ethnic names by Australian-born Turkish author Dilvin Yasa

“Have you ever considered changing your name to something more ‘white’?” asked a literary agent the other day. “It’s been my experience that authors with strong, Anglo names tend to do better at the cash registers than those who have ethnic or even Aboriginal names.”

[…]

“Leave your name as it is!” [Jane Palfreyman] wrote. “I can tell you that their names have affected the popularity of Anh Do*, Christos Tsiolkas, Kevin Kwan or Munjed Al Muderis – and indeed may well have contributed to their success.”

*Misspelled “Ahn Do” in the original text.

From an article called “Restore Yamhill!” in the March 30, 1917, issue of The New York Sun:

The City Commission of Portland, Ore., has succumbed to an attack of mock elegance and under its influence has erased from the map the excellent, juicy and meaningful name of Yamhill street, substituting for it the commonplace and sordid Market street.

[…]

Yamhill is ancient, respectable, typical, historic. Alexander Henry, a fur trader of the Northwest Company, traversing the then unknown Willamette country, met at Willamette Falls, January 10, 1814, seven “ugly, ill formed Indians” leading a horse. They were of the Yamhela tribe, as Henry spelled it in his diary, the name being derived from the Yamhela, or yellow river.

From an article about Rose Collom in True West Magazine:

Rose was the perfect name for the Grand Canyon’s first official botanist, because self-taught Rose Collom blossomed when exposed to the state’s flora.

Rose discovered several varieties of plants previously unknown, and each was named after her.

Want to see more quotes about names? Check out the name quotes category.


Most Common Names in Cyprus – Maria, Andreas

The Statistical Service of Cyprus conducted a Population Census in late 2011. According to the data collected at that time, the most common female and male names on the island were Maria and Andreas.

Here are the next-most-popular names (different sources listed different transcriptions for several):

Female Names Male Names
1. Maria (39,883 females)
2. Eleni (29,393 females)
3. Androula/Androulla
4. Georgia
5. Panagiota/Panayiota
6. Anna
7. Christina
1. Andreas (36,682 males)
2. Giorgos/Yiorgos (26,284 males)
3. Costas/Kostas
4. Christos
5. Nicholas/Nikolas
6. Michalis
7. Panagiotis/Panayiotis

Some of the rare names that appeared on the census just 10 times each included Chrysalia, Dalia, Felicia, Isidora, Loreta and Mariliza (female names) and Memnon, Merkouris, Morfakis and Rodotheos (male names).

Sources: Maria and Andreas most popular baby names, Maria and Andreas the most common names in Cyprus

Who Should Have the Final Say, Mom or Dad? [Poll]

When it comes to names, who should have the final say, the mother or the father?*

In April of 1914, a Los Angeles judge “rendered a decision that a wife has absolute authority in the naming of children. The husband has nothing to do with it.”

The ruling was made in the case of Chrystos Malamatinos, a Greek, who insisted that his baby daughter be named after Helen of Troy. His wife, and American, insisted on Muriel, and the court sustained her choice and ordered Malamatinos to pay the family $5 a week.

According to records, his name was actually spelled Christos Malamatinas, and his wife was named Esther May Reynolds.

They were married in 1912. Their baby girl was born in August of 1913.

Esther had discovered the name Muriel in a novel. When Christos learned that she had named the baby Muriel, he left home in protest. He was eventually charged with failure to provide for his family, and that’s how the couple ended up in court.

Now for a pair of polls:

Who should have the final say on baby names?

View Results

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I would have chosen the name...

View Results

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Here’s a similar poll, Antoinette vs. Annette, if you’re interested.

And here’s a court case like the one above, though I don’t know what the outcome was.

*I’m using heterosexual terminology here, just to keep things simple, but feel free to open things up and discuss other scenarios — homosexual, polyamorous, etc. — in the comments.

Sources:

  • “Greek to Stay in Jail Until Muriel is Helen.” Chicago Daily Tribune 15 Apr. 1914: 14.
  • “Wife Has Absolute Right to Name Children.” Evening News [San Jose] 17 April 1914: 5.