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Popularity of the Baby Name Clint

Number of Babies Named Clint

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Clint

Baby Name Battle: Clint vs. Flint vs. Quint vs. Vint

INT names, question, tv names, cowboys

It’s the end of The Week of Int! We’ve looked at the names Clint, Flint, Quint, and Vint — all four of which were associated with TV cowboys during the second half of the 1950s, and all four of which saw increased usage on the baby name charts in the ’50s thanks to these associations.

So now it’s your turn. Which of these -int names is your favorite?

The -INT name I like best is...

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The Week of Int: Vint

vint, restless gun, western, television
Vint
The baby name Vint debuted in the baby name data in 1958:

  • 1964: unlisted
  • 1963: 5 baby boys named Vint
  • 1962: unlisted
  • 1961: 9 baby boys named Vint
  • 1960: 15 baby boys named Vint
  • 1959: 35 baby boys named Vint
  • 1958: 21 baby boys named Vint [debut]
  • 1957: unlisted

The influence? Vint Bonner, the main character of the TV Western The Restless Gun (1957-1959).

Vint was a “freelance cowpoke” who traveled alone through the post-Civil War West. The character was played by John Payne, who had starred in Miracle on 34th Street a decade earlier. Payne say of the character: “If there’s such a thing as a next-door neighbor in a Western that’s Vint Bonner.”

The series was based on a radio show (The Six Shooter, 1953-1954) in which the main character was named Britt Ponset. For TV, the character’s personality was altered slightly and his name was changed from “Britt” to “Vint” (…perhaps to make it sound more like Clint?).

Do you like the name Vint?

Sources:

  • Marill, Alvin H. Television Westerns: Six Decades of Sagebrush Sheriffs, Scalawags, and Sidewinders.. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, 2011.
  • “TV Goes Wild Over Westerns.” LIFE 28 Oct. 1957: 99-106.

The Week of Int: Clint

western, television, clint walker, cheyenne bodie, cheyenne
Clint Walker as Cheyenne Bodie
Welcome to the Week of Int! “The week of what?” The Week of Int!

It’s a week of posts focusing on the four -int names that were popularized by fictional TV cowboys (or the actors who played them) during the late ’50s and early ’60s.

First up? Clint.

Clint was already seeing moderate usage in the early ’50s, but usage increased considerably in mid-1950s:

  • 1959: 482 baby boys named Clint (rank: 357th)
  • 1958: 474 baby boys named Clint (350th)
  • 1957: 398 baby boys named Clint (385th)
  • 1956: 258 baby boys named Clint (469th)
  • 1955: 115 baby boys named Clint (682nd)
  • 1954: 81 baby boys named Clint (803rd)
  • 1953: 106 baby boys named Clint (693rd)
  • 1952: 84 baby boys named Clint (767th)
  • 1951: 79 baby boys named Clint (793rd)
  • 1950: 60 baby boys named Clint (886th)

The reason for the rise? My money’s on Clint Walker, the actor who played the part of Cheyenne Bodie in the successful TV Western Cheyenne (1955-1963), which happened to be TV’s first hour-long Western.

Cheyenne Bodie was “a former frontier scout who drifts through the old West, traveling without any particular motivation from one adventure to another.”

The series was held together not so much by its premise as by its charismatic star, Clint Walker, who rose from obscurity to become one of the icons of the TV western. With his powerful physique and towering height, Walker commanded the small screen through sheer presence; his performance gained gravity simply from the way his body dominated the screen.

According to the Nielsen ratings, Cheyenne was a top-20 series for three seasons straight (1957-1958, 1958-1959, and 1959-1960).

The show also boosted the male usage of Cheyenne during the second half of the 1950s and through most of the 1960s.

But I should mention that Clint Walker and Cheyenne are only part of the story, as several other gun-slinging Clints also emerged around this time:

  • Clint Tollinger, a character played by Robert Mitchum in the movie Man with the Gun (1955).
  • Clint Reno, a character played by Elvis Presley in the movie Love Me Tender (1956).
  • Clint Travis, a character played by and Paul “Kelo” Henderson in the TV series 26 Men (1957-1959).

There was also a non-gun-slinging teenager named Clint in the short Micky Mouse Club serial The Adventures of Clint and Mac (most episodes aired in January of 1958).

The rise of Clint didn’t continue into the ’60s, despite a continued Clint presence in pop culture:

  • Clint Eastwood, the actor who played Rowdy Yates on the TV series Rawhide (1959-1966).
  • Clint McCoy, a character played by Rory Calhoun in the movie Young Fury (1965).

But usage picked back up in the ’70s. Clint saw peak popularity in 1980. These days, usage is roughly back down to pre-Cheyenne levels.

Do you like the name Clint? Would you use it for your baby boy?

Source: Cheyenne, U.S. Western – The Museum of Broadcast Communications

Names Popular During the Victorian Era

Tuesday’s post about the Victorian-style Tylney Hall Hotel reminded me of a list of Victorian-era names that I’ve had bookmarked forever.

The list was created by amateur genealogist G. M. Atwater as a resource for writers. It contains names and name combinations that were commonly seen in the U.S. from the 1840s to the 1890s. Below is the full list (with a few minor changes).

Victorian Era Female Names Victorian Era Male Names
  • Abigale / Abby
  • Ada
  • Adella
  • Agnes
  • Allie
  • Almira / Almyra
  • Alva
  • America
  • Amelia
  • Ann / Annie
  • Arrah
  • Beatrice
  • Bernice
  • Charity
  • Charlotte
  • Chastity
  • Claire
  • Constance
  • Cynthia
  • Dorothy / Dot
  • Edith
  • Edna
  • Edwina
  • Ella
  • Eleanor
  • Ellie
  • Elizabeth / Eliza / Liza / Lizzy / Bess / Bessie / Beth / Betsy
  • Elvira
  • Emma
  • Esther
  • Ethel
  • Eudora
  • Eva
  • Fidelia
  • Frances / Fanny
  • Flora
  • Florence
  • Geneve
  • Genevieve
  • Georgia
  • Gertrude / Gertie
  • Gladys
  • Grace
  • Hannah
  • Hattie
  • Helen
  • Helene
  • Henrietta / Hettie / Ettie
  • Hester
  • Hope
  • Hortence
  • Isabell / Isabella
  • Jane
  • Jennie
  • Jessamine
  • Josephine
  • Judith
  • Julia
  • Juliet
  • Katherine / Kate
  • Laura
  • Leah
  • Lenora
  • Letitia
  • Lila
  • Lilly
  • Lorena
  • Lorraine
  • Lottie
  • Louise / Louisa
  • Lucy
  • Lulu
  • Lydia
  • Mahulda
  • Margaret / Peggie
  • Mary / Molly / Polly
  • Mary Elizabeth
  • Mary Frances
  • Martha
  • Matilda / Mattie
  • Maude
  • Maxine / Maxie
  • Mercy
  • Mildred
  • Minerva
  • Missouri
  • Myrtle
  • Nancy
  • Natalie
  • Nellie / Nelly
  • Nettie
  • Nora
  • Orpha
  • Patsy
  • Parthena
  • Permelia
  • Phoebe
  • Philomena
  • Preshea
  • Rachel
  • Rebecca / Becky
  • Rhoda / Rhody
  • Rowena
  • Rufina
  • Ruth
  • Samantha
  • Sally
  • Sarah
  • Sarah Ann
  • Sarah Elizabeth
  • Savannah
  • Selina
  • Sophronia
  • Stella
  • Theodosia / Theda
  • Vertiline / Verd
  • Victoria
  • Virginia / Ginny
  • Vivian
  • Winnifred / Winnie
  • Zona
  • Zylphia
  • Aaron
  • Abraham / Abe
  • Alan / Allen
  • Albert
  • Alexander
  • Alonzo
  • Ambrose
  • Amon
  • Amos
  • Andrew / Drew / Andy
  • Aquilla
  • Archibald / Archie
  • Arnold
  • Asa
  • August / Augustus / Gus
  • Barnabas / Barney
  • Bartholomew / Bart
  • Benjamin
  • Bennet
  • Benedict
  • Bernard
  • Bertram / Bert
  • Buford
  • Byron
  • Calvin
  • Cephas
  • Charles / Charley / Charlie
  • Christopher
  • Christopher Columbus
  • Clarence
  • Clement / Clem
  • Clinton / Clint
  • Cole
  • Columbus / Lom / Lum
  • Commodore Perry
  • Daniel / Dan
  • David
  • Edmund
  • Edward / Ned
  • Edwin
  • Eldon
  • Eli
  • Elijah
  • Elisha
  • Emmett
  • Enoch
  • Ezekiel / Zeke
  • Ezra
  • Francis / Frank
  • Franklin
  • Frederick / Fred
  • Gabriel / Gabe
  • Garrett
  • George
  • George Washington
  • Gideon
  • Gilbert / Gil
  • Granville
  • Harland
  • Harrison
  • Harold / Harry
  • Harvey
  • Henry / Hank
  • Hiram
  • Horace
  • Horatio
  • Hugh
  • Isaiah
  • Israel
  • Isaac / Ike
  • Isaac Newton
  • Jacob / Jake
  • James / Jim
  • Jasper
  • Jefferson / Jeff
  • Jedediah / Jed
  • Jeptha
  • Jesse
  • Joel
  • John / Jack
  • John Paul
  • John Wesley
  • Jonathan
  • Joseph / Josephus
  • Josiah
  • Joshua
  • Julian
  • Julius
  • Lafayette / Lafe
  • Lawrence / Larry
  • Leander
  • Les / Lester / Leslie
  • Lewis / Lew / Louis
  • Levi
  • Lucas
  • Lucian
  • Lucius
  • Luke
  • Luther
  • Louis
  • Levi
  • Lucas
  • Lucian
  • Lucius
  • Luke
  • Luther
  • Matthew
  • Marcellus
  • Mark
  • Martin
  • Martin Luther
  • Masheck
  • Maurice
  • Maxwell
  • Merrill
  • Meriwether
  • Meriwether Lewis
  • Michael / Mike
  • Micajah / Cage
  • Mordecai
  • Morgan
  • Morris
  • Nathaniel / Nathan / Nate / Nat
  • Newton / Newt
  • Nicholas / Nick
  • Nimrod
  • Ninian
  • Obediah
  • Octavius
  • Ora / Oral
  • Orville
  • Oscar
  • Owen
  • Paul
  • Patrick / Pat
  • Patrick Henry
  • Paul
  • Perry
  • Peter
  • Pleasant
  • Ralph
  • Raymond
  • Reuben
  • Robert / Bob
  • Robert Lee
  • Richard / Rich / Dick
  • Roderick
  • Rudolph
  • Rufus
  • Samuel
  • Sam Houston
  • Seth
  • Silas
  • Simon
  • Simeon
  • Stanley / Stan
  • Stephen
  • Thaddeus
  • Thomas / Tom
  • Thomas Jefferson
  • Theodore / Ted
  • Timothy / Tim
  • Ulysses
  • Uriah
  • Victor
  • Walter
  • Warren
  • Washington
  • Wilfred
  • William / Will / Bill / Billy
  • Willie
  • Zachariah
  • Zebulon
  • Zedock

Which female name and male name do you like best?

Source: Victorian Era Names, A Writer’s Guide

Pop Culture Baby Name: Rowdy

The baby name Rowdy debuted in the US baby name data in 1959.

The black-and-white TV western Rawhide (1959-1966) was set in the 1860s, just after the Civil War. It depicted a group of men who drove cattle from San Antonio northward via the Sedalia Trail to Sedalia, Missouri.

One of those men was Rowdy Yates, the group’s ramrod (second-in-charge after the trail boss). Rowdy was played by a young Clint Eastwood. The show’s popularity helped launch Eastwood’s career.

It also helped launched the baby name Rowdy, which appeared for the first time on the Social Security Administration’s baby name list in 1959:

  • 1966: 29 baby boys named Rowdy
  • 1965: 40 baby boys named Rowdy
  • 1964: 39 baby boys named Rowdy
  • 1963: 38 baby boys named Rowdy
  • 1962: 45 baby boys named Rowdy
  • 1961: 29 baby boys named Rowdy
  • 1960: 27 baby boys named Rowdy
  • 1959: 22 baby boys named Rowdy [debut]
  • 1958: unlisted

Unlike many pop culture baby names, Rowdy didn’t fade away after the show left the airwaves.

Two or three dozen baby boys got the name every year for the next few decades, until the 1990s, when usage actually picked up.

Here are the most recent numbers for Rowdy:

  • 2012: 108 baby boys named Rowdy
  • 2011: 127 baby boys named Rowdy
  • 2010: 100 baby boys named Rowdy
  • 2009: 133 baby boys named Rowdy
  • 2008: 140 baby boys named Rowdy
  • 2007: 106 baby boys named Rowdy
  • 2006: 107 baby boys named Rowdy (+ 5 named Rowdie, + 5 girls named Rowdy)
  • 2005: 79 baby boys named Rowdy

A large proportion of all this usage happened in Texas specifically.

Here are the same years as above, but for Texas only:

  • 2012: 27 baby boys named Rowdy in Texas
  • 2011: 36 baby boys named Rowdy in Texas
  • 2010: 23 baby boys named Rowdy in Texas
  • 2009: 21 baby boys named Rowdy in Texas
  • 2008: 27 baby boys named Rowdy in Texas
  • 2007: 21 baby boys named Rowdy in Texas
  • 2006: 25 baby boys named Rowdy in Texas
  • 2005: 27 baby boys named Rowdy in Texas

There were also a good number of Rowdys born in Oklahoma.

So, what does the word rowdy mean, and where does it come from?

It’s a specifically American word that was first recorded as a noun in the early 1800s. It originally meant “lawless backwoodsman” and was probably based on the word row, “noisy commotion.” Today, a rowdy is “a rough, quarrelsome person.” The adjective rowdy is synonymous with words like “disorderly,” “unruly” and “boisterous.”

Source: Rowdy – Online Etymology Dictionary

P.S. Another TV Western that influenced baby names? Bonanza.