How popular is the baby name Clyde in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Clyde and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Clyde.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Clyde

Number of Babies Named Clyde

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Clyde

Popular Baby Names in Sonoma County, CA, 2016

Sonoma_CountyAccording to the Sonoma County site SoCo Data, the most popular baby names in 2016 were Emma and and Mateo.

Here are the county’s top 5 girl names and top 5 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Emma, 34 baby girls
2. Sophia, 28
3. Olivia, 27
4. Isabella, 23
5. Ava and Sofia, 21 (2-way tie)

Boy Names
1. Mateo, 35 baby boys
2. Sebastian and William, 26 (2-way tie)
3. Benjamin, 24
4. David and Lucas, 23 (2-way tie)
5. Jayden, 21

The top names in 2015 were a pair of ties: Ava & Olivia and Mateo & Daniel.

And, currently, the top names of 2017 are Mia and Mateo. (The dataset was last updated on October 2.)

Finally, here are some of the baby names that were bestowed just once in Sonoma in 2016:

Unique Girl Names Unique Boy Names
Amerabelle, Atlantis, Bleena, Calandra, Dallary, Diosa, Evaluna, Happy, Ivoryana, Jerusha, Kessley, Liliokalani, Maridahlia, Nabella, Parmys, Ravellen, Seva, Tajalli, Tusita, Velisse, Yadzell, Zemyna, Zyla Aeson, Ayris, Baxley, Cassius Clyde, Caulder, Coyote, Dorlan, Fling, Helio, Jaxper, Jenry, Kavari, Knoxville, Kolinio, Macario, Mountain, Nasric, Nyan, Olavio, Rigel, Rorik, Sonnen, Xompakh, Yolotli, Zaqarry

Source: SoCo Data


Baby Names from Pullman Cars?

pullman car, train,Years ago I posted about Livonia, a baby both born on and named after a Pullman car. Recently I wondered: What other Pullman car names would have made good baby names?

So I downloaded a big spreadsheet of over 12,000 Pullman car names from The Pullman Project and was slightly surprised to see that thousands of them could have been baby names, if we allow for the splitting of compound car names (like Fort Miley, Glen Norman, Meredith College, and West Willow).

Here are a handful of examples. On the left are relatively common/familiar names, and on the right are some unexpected choices.

Alana, Archer, Arnold Adriatha, Arundel, Arvonia
Baxter, Becket, Bradley Bantry, Bellonia, Besco
Calvin, Catalina, Clyde Cadesia, Clarnie, Clymer
Dana, Deborah, Dwight Darlow, Dathema, Dodona
Edith, Eileen, Elmo Edminster, Emalinda, Etherley
Finley, Flavia, Floyd Fithian, Flaxton, Florilla
Gary, Georgette, Grayson Gavarnie, Gilia, Gloxinia
Harper, Harriet, Hector Harista, Humela, Hythe
Iona, Isabella, Ivan Irvona, Isleta, Ixion
Jessica, Jordan, Julia Jacelia, Jathniel, Justitia
Kara, Keith, Kenneth Keinath, Kenia, Kittson
Laurel, Lewis, Linden Lauveta, Leolyn, Lysander
Madison, Marco, Maude Mardonia, Mayence, Morganza
Nicola, Noel, Nora Narinda, Nasby, Norlina
Olivia, Omar, Otis Oaklyn, Olanda, Oxus
Parker, Perry, Philippa Penlyn, Pipila, Pixley
Quincy Quarren
Rebecca, Riley, Ronald Rexis, Risley, Ruxton
Sarah, Scott, Susanne Salphrona, Sarver, Sibley
Thora, Tracy, Tyler Tascott, Tilden, Tisonia
Vanessa, Vernon, Victoria Varick, Vinora, Vivita
Wesley, Wilson, Wren Welby, Wescott, Wexford

Which of the names above do you like best?

California Family with 22 Children

Story family of California in 1940 U.S. census
The Story family on the 1940 U.S. Census
Marion and Charlotte “Lottie” Story of Bakersfield, California, had at least 22 children — including five sets of twins — from 1922 to 1946. Seventeen of their kids are listed on the 1940 U.S. Census (at right).

I don’t know the names of all the Story children, but here are 20 of them: Jean, Jane, Jack, Jacqueline, June, Eileen, Clyde, Robert, James, Jeannette, Steve, Jerry, Terry (sometimes “Terrytown”), Charlotte, Scotty, Sherrie, Garry, Joanne, Frances (called Lidwina), and Monica (called Sandy).

Charlotte Story herself was one of a dozen children, born from 1899 to 1919. Her 11 siblings were named Pearl, George, Rhea, Hazel, Fern, Ira, Myrtle, Dorothy, Helen, Russell, and Viola.

And Charlotte’s mother Elsie was one of 13 children, born from 1865 to 1892. Her 12 siblings were named Edward, Levi, William, Frank, Rosa, Joseph, Mary, Elizabeth, Margaret, Archibald, Gertrude, and Emma.

So here’s the question: If you had to choose all of your own children’s names from just one of the sibsets above, which set would you pick? Why?

Sources: Charlotte M Lacount Story – Find A Grave, Elsie E Dubay LaCount – Find A Grave

The Naming of Pluto

Pluto
Pluto
Today marks the 86th anniversary of the discovery of Pluto.

One thing I’ve always found interesting about the former planet is that its discovery/naming involve a string of people who all happen to have memorable names: Percival, Vesto, Clyde, Herbert, Falconer, and Venetia.

Businessman and astronomer Percival Lowell began looking for the trans-Neptunian planet he’d postulated — “Planet X” — in the early 1900s at Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona Territory. Even after he died in 1916, Observatory staff kept up the search.

Young astronomer Clyde W. Tombaugh, using photos taken by the Observatory’s astrograph, finally made the discovery on February 18, 1930. The existence of a ninth planet was announced to the public on March 13, which would have been Percival Lowell’s 75th birthday. It was also the anniversary of the discovery of Uranus (in 1781).

Now it was up to the director of Lowell Observatory, astronomer Vesto M. Slipher, to name the new planet.

Soon suggestions indeed poured in from all quarters: Cronus, Odin, Persephone, Erebos, Atlas, Prometheus…the list seemed endless. One young couple even wrote to Tombaugh asking that the planet be named after their newborn child!

The suggestion Slipher liked best was “Pluto.” Not only was Pluto one of the few good names from classical mythology not already in use (Pluto was the ruler of the underworld) but its first two letters coincided with Percival Lowell’s initials.

Ostensibly the suggestion had come to Slipher via telegram from Oxford astronomer Herbert Hall Turner, who was passing it along for retired Bodleian Librarian Falconer Madan, who had gotten it from his 11-year-old granddaughter Venetia Burney, who’d come up with it over breakfast the day after the discovery was announced.

Nowadays it’s hard to believe that Venetia was the very first person to propose the name Pluto. Astronomers at the Brera Observatory in Milan, for instance, had nicknamed the planet Pluto soon after it was discovered. (And Slipher was no doubt aware of this.)

Nevertheless, when Slipher used the name in print for the first time on May 1, he gave Venetia Burney full credit. On May 25, the planet was officially named Pluto.

Today’s question: Which of the male names above do you like best? Vote below, then tell me why in the comments.

Which of these male names do you like best?

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Sources: Finding Pluto: Tough Task, Even 75 Years Later, The girl who named a planet, Another Plutonian Casualty?, The Discovery of Pluto
Image: Global Mosaic of Pluto in True Color (credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI)

Missouri Man Named “Soda Popp”

man named soda popp

Clyde and Dorothy Popp of Missouri had a baby boy in 1952 and named him Soda.

Yup — Soda Popp.

When Soda Popp was enrolled in school, it made the news:

Jefferson City, Mo., May 15 (AP) Soda Popp, 5, has been enrolled for kindergarten here next year.

And he’s been in the news quite a bit since, thanks to his memorable name.

In a 2003 interview with the Kansas City Star, he had this to say about it:

“I tell folks I have a sister named Lolly,” he said with a laugh. “And that I have twin sons, Snap and Crackle.”

That’s fiction, of course. But his name? That’s pure fact, he insists.

“My mom wanted to give me a name that would stand out – something unusual; something folks wouldn’t forget,” he said.

It’s worked. “People say, ‘How could your parents name you that?’ But I’m glad they did. My name has opened a lot of doors for me.”

A writer for the Topeka Capital-Journal spent a few days with Soda Popp in 2007. He said Soda was often forced to produce his driver’s license to prove his name really was “Soda Popp.”

What do you think of the name “Soda Popp” — cool, or cruel?

P.S. Soda Popp reminds me of two names I’ve seen on the 1940 census: R C Cola Osbey, a 21-year-old man in Texas, and Seven Up Stubin, a 22-year-old man in South Carolina. (And Seven Up Stubin reminds me of Lemon Lime Clay.)

Sources:

  • “A Little Drink.” Milwaukee Sentinel 16 May 1957: 2.
  • Frazee, Brent. “Refreshing Soda: Yes, his name is really ‘Soda Popp.'” Kansas City Star 25 May 2003: C14.
  • Murrell, Marc. “Drinking in Soda’s tales.” Topeka Capital-Journal 13 May 2007.