How popular is the baby name Colin in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Colin and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Colin.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Colin

Number of Babies Named Colin

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Colin

Men with “Black” Names Seen as Aggressive, Low Status

According to a study published recently in Evolution and Human Behavior, men with black-sounding names “are thought to be larger and more dangerous” than men with white-sounding names.

The study involved more than 1,500 participants, most of whom were white. After reading three different vignettes (“neutral,” “successful,” “threatening”) that featured characters with either stereotypically white-sounding or stereotypically black-sounding names, the participants were asked to describe the characters.

The study…found that men with black-sounding names, such as Jamal, DeShawn, or Darnell, were assumed to be physically larger, more aggressive, and lower in status, compared to men with white-sounding names such as Connor, Wyatt, or Garnett.

The lead author of the study, Colin Holbrook, said via press release: “I’ve never been so disgusted by my own data.” He also called the results disturbing. I agree…though I don’t find them particularly surprising.

Source: Baby Names 2015: ‘Black’-sounding Names Usually Met With Prejudice, Assumed To Be Large, Dangerous People [Study]

Train Baby Named for Vaudeville Star

On December 27, 1916, a baby girl was born to Mrs. Colin Campbell aboard a Los Angeles Limited passenger train as it was passing through Jericho, Utah, en route to Salt Lake City.

A pullman porter named Samuel Joseph assisted with the birth, and vaudeville actress Sophie Tucker, who happened to be in Salt Lake at the time, “gave up her state room to the child’s mother when informed of the circumstances.”

In thanks to the latter, the baby was named Sophie Tucker Campbell.

Decades later, in 1949, Sophie and Samuel began holding annual reunions. In 1953, they were guests on the NBC radio show Welcome Travelers. Here’s a photo:

sophie tucker campbell


  • “Child Born on Train.” Deseret News 28 Dec. 1916: 9.
  • “Reunion in Chicago.” Jet 13 Aug. 1953: 61.

Name Quotes for the Weekend #6

Nick Lachey on how his son Camden was named (via Inquisitr):

“It’s kind of a funny story. I’ve always liked the name Colin. We thought that Colin would be the name. And John is my dad’s name…But as we got further into it, I learned that Vanessa wasn’t a big fan of the name Colin, so we started looking for another ‘C’ name.”

But Minnillo’s OB-GYN was located on Camden Drive, and Nick Lachey says it was there that inspiration struck, and he suggested the street name to Vanessa. It was then, he says, the name stuck:

“We didn’t really know anyone else named Camden. It was such a neat name. We fell in love with it and decided on it five or six months ago.”

Jools Oliver–wife of celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, and mom to Poppy Honey, Daisy Boo, Petal Blossom Rainbow and Buddy Bear–on baby names (via Gurgle magazine):

I hate people’s opinions on names; whatever you call your baby is your decision.

The #1 thing this expectant mom would have done differently regarding her pregnancy (via Momaroo):

1) Keep the name choices to myself. […] We got a few positive reactions, with questions, because the names we chose weren’t common but have deep meaning for us. One friend, however, made a face & said the boy name we picked was old fashioned & he would be teased for it & asked why we picked it in the first place. Then she told my husband that the first boy was “supposed to be named after him” & reiterated the teasing part. All of this caused quite a few arguments between me & my husband.

From UK radio DJ Andy Walker, who asked listeners to call in with “the most unusual names you have heard for someone.”

Charlene Fitzgerald told me her friend named her twins Storm and Lightning. Oh, come on! Was the mother a fan of the weather, or superheroes?

The names kept on coming – Michelle Edwards knows of a dad who is an avid Manchester United fan, so much so that his daughter is called Manchester and his son is named Bobby.

The randomness did not cease as Caroline Loughrey posted on kmfm Drivetime Facebook page that her sister-in-law has named her daughter Galactica.

Clare Turk said that is becoming popular to name a daughter, Lanesra – which is Arsenal backwards. Really? That is the first time I have ever heard of doing that.

Other names that came to my attention were Simba for a son, Seksy for a daughter – good luck with that during the school register – and a boy called Trucker. You can guess what his father did for a living.

From “Don’t name your Jewish baby Meth, if that was the plan” in j.weekly:

Names are, as scientists know, critical to one’s success in life and how people perceive us. It’s unlikely you’d name your newborn son “Methuselah,” since the name connotes an old man with a long beard and exhausted medical benefits. Nor would it help to nickname your son “Meth.”

From “Amarillo’s first baby of 2009” in the Amarillo Globe-News:

When Dominic James Brown entered the world shortly after midnight on New Year’s Day, he brought with him controversy that shook the maternity ward of Baptist St. Anthony’s Hospital.

The newborn, named after a character from the film “Kindergarten Cop,” beat out his closest competition by a mere six minutes – snatching the title of Amarillo’s first baby of the year.

I’m kinda shocked that people not only remember Kindergarten Cop, but still like it enough after all these years to name a baby after one of the characters.

From “Malaysia’s ‘Baby-Dumping’ Epidemic” at

Out-of-wedlock children across Malaysia are given this same surname (illegitimate boys receive “bin Abdullah”), permanently stigmatizing them in a very family-oriented society.

The surname for girls (mentioned a few sentences earlier) was “binti Abdullah.”

Unusual Baby Name Spellings in Minnesota

Many parents choose to personalize their baby’s name by using a variant spelling. Here are some interesting baby name spellings that have been used recently in southeastern Minnesota, for example:

  • Madeline, Madalyn, Madelin, Madelyn, Madelynn, Madelynne, Madilyn, Matalynn
  • Madison, Madisyn, Madyson
  • Jackson, Jaxon, Jaxson
  • Collin, Colin, Calin
  • Dylan, Dillon, Dilyn
  • Owen, Owyn, Owin
  • Caiden, Cayden, Caden, Caedyn, Kaiden, Kayden, Kaden, Kaeden
  • Aiden, Aidan, Ayden, Aden, Aeyden
  • Jaden, Jayden, Jaedyn, Jaiden, Jadyn
  • Brayden, Braydan, Braden
  • Erik, Eric, Arik, Aeric
  • Hailey, Haley, Haylie, Haylee, Hayley
  • Kailey, Kaylie, Kaley, Kaylee, Kaileigh
  • Kiley, Kyleigh, Kylee
  • Kalli, Kally, Kalie
  • Chloe, Khloe, Kloey, Chloee
  • McKayla, Mackayla, Makaila, Mikaela
  • Savanna, Savannah, Syvannah
  • Olivia, Alyvia, Alivia

I found these in a recent article written by Aleta Capelle (who has a pretty cool name herself). The names come from babies born in Olmsted County, Minnesota from July 1, 2006 through July 1, 2007.