How popular is the baby name Cory in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Cory and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Cory.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Cory

Number of Babies Named Cory

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Cory

Study Finds Less Name-Based Hiring Bias…Maybe

resumeA recent study by University of Missouri researchers Cory Koedel and Rajeev Darolia found that resumes featuring black-sounding and Hispanic-sounding names were “just as likely to lead to callbacks and job interviews” as those featuring white-sounding names.

The catch?

The study focused on applicant surnames, not first names.

Washington and Jefferson were used to represent African American applicants, Anderson and Thompson to represent white applicants, and Hernandez and Garcia to represent Hispanic applicants.

For the first two groups, forenames were used to signify gender only. Chloe and Ryan were used for the African American applicants, Megan and Brian for the white applicants.

But for the Hispanic applicants, called either Isabella or Carlos, forenames also signified ethnicity.

Why did the researchers do it this way?

Because they wanted to avoid stereotypically black-sounding first names like Lakisha and Jamal, which they felt were too strongly tied to socioeconomic status to get a clear reading on racial bias.

Which is a fair point, though…can surnames alone convey race all that well? Would a hiring manager really assume that an applicant with the surname Jefferson was black while another with the surname Thompson was white?

Though I’d love to see proof that hiring discrimination is on the wane in the U.S., I’m not sure how convincing a surname-focused study can be in this regard. (I do find the part about Hispanic names encouraging, though.)

What’s your opinion?

Sources: Hiring bias study: Resumes with black, white, Hispanic names treated the same, An Updated Analysis of Race and Gender Effects on Employer Interest in Job Applicants (PDF)


Ever Wanted to Change Your Child’s Name?

A friend of mine almost changed the name of her second daughter. While she didn’t end up making the change, it’s not unheard of for parents to legally change the names of their children–even years after the fact.

That’s what Johnny Carson did. According to all the biographies, Johnny’s three sons are named Christopher (b. 1950), Richard (b. 1952) and Cory (b. 1953). But Richard and Cory weren’t born Richard and Cory. They were born Kim and Barry.

In 1957, Johnny and his wife changed the names of their two youngest sons. Kim Arthur, who was five at the time, became Richard (nickname Ricky). Barry William, who was three, became Cory. Kim had been having “a little trouble over his name being mistaken for a girl’s” (actress Kim Novak was hitting it big in the late 1950s) and Barry simply preferred the name Cory to his own.

Have you ever been tempted to
change the names of your child(ren)?

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If you answered yes, please tell us more. Why did you want to make the change? What names were involved? Did you end up going through with it?

Sources:

  • “Carson Boys Get ‘Real Guy’ Names.” Sun [Baltimore] 13 Sept. 1957: 3.
  • “Johnny Carson Changes Names of Two Sons.” Los Angeles Times 13 Sept 1957: B1.

Blogger Baby Name – Poesy Emmeline Fibonacci Nautilus

BoingBoing’s Cory Doctorow and his partner, Alice Taylor, just welcomed a baby girl. Their newborn daughter’s full name is Poesy Emmeline Fibonacci Nautilus Taylor Doctorow.

What do the names refer to? According to the links in Cory’s post…

  • Poesy is defined as “poetry; poetic language and ideas; literature; a poem, a passage of poetry.”
  • Emmeline was inspired by British suffragette Emmeline Pankhurst (1858-1928).
  • Fibonacci was inspired by Italian mathematician Fibonacci (c.1170-c.1250).
    • Did you know that Fibonacci’s name is actually a sobriquet? It was created either from Filiorum Bonacci, “of the family of Bonacci,” or Filius Bonacci, “son of Bonacci.” His real name was Leonardo of Pisa (or Leonardo Pisano).
  • Nautilus was inspired by the submarine Nautilus in science fiction novel Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (1870) by Jules Verne.

Here are some of the comments Cory has received regarding the name so far:

  • “Too bad you won’t have any names available for the next child.”
  • “And you do realize you have doomed her to a life of “No, my name’s NOT POSY.””
  • “I’m particularly fond of Emmeline, though my inner geek is jumping for joy at “Fibonacci Nautilus”.”
  • “P.E.F.N.T.D. is going to be hell to monogram, though.”

What’s your opinion of the name?

(A big thanks to Nancy Friedman of Away With Words for telling me about this one!)