How popular is the baby name Cotton in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Cotton and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Cotton.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Cotton

Number of Babies Named Cotton

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Cotton

Name Quotes for the Weekend #35

Happy New Year, everyone! Some quotes to kick off 2016…

From an article about Taylor Swift in GQ:

Swift mentions that she wrote a non-autobiographical novel when she was 14, titled A Girl Named Girl, and that her parents still have it. I ask her what it was about, assuming she will laugh. But her memory of the plot is remarkably detailed. (It’s about a mother who wants a son but instead has a girl.)

From a biography of North Carolina businessman Edward James Parrish in the book Makers of America: Biographies of Leading Men of Thought and Action, vol. II (1916):

Colonel Parrish was born near Round Hill Post Office, then in Orange County (now Durham County), on October 20, 1846, son of Colonel Doctor Claiborn and Ruthy Anne (Ward) Parrish. His father had the peculiar given name of Doctor because he was a seventh son, in accordance with the old belief that the seventh son has the gift of healing.

From What’s in a name? Everything, if you are a migrant and Muslim by Yusuf Sheikh Omar (found via Anna’s Wintery Name News post at Waltzing More than Matilda):

Many Somali refugees have changed their names. Since 1991 a brutal civil war in our homeland, in the Horn of Africa, has displaced 1.7 million people, roughly one-fifth of the population. The displaced spent years in refugee camps or embarked on long, treacherous journeys to safety; the luckier ones found haven in countries such as Australia and elsewhere in the West. Some of these newly arrived refugees feared that if they kept their real names, the authorities would trace their travel route and return people to their last country of departure. So these Somalis changed their names on arrival at the airport. Many still use these bogus names in official documents, but use their real names in the community.

[…]

Some of the generation who changed their names have since passed away leaving their children with unknown family and clan names. These young people are in limbo, both in the Somali community in Australia and in their country of origin. From other Somalis they often hear insults, such as “you have a fake family name.”

From an article about late Mexican American singer Selena Quintanilla:

Selena continues to have influence over other known and up-and-coming performers. Born in 1992 near Dallas, Disney bopper Selena Gomez, now a pop star of her own, was named after the queen of Tejano (during Selena’s 1991-1995 reign, her name skyrocketed from 780 to 91 in the rankings of most popular baby names in America).

From Anthony S. Kline’s translation of Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Book 9:

When the pains grew, and her burden pushed its own way into the world, and a girl was born, the mother ordered it to be reared, deceitfully, as a boy, without the father realising. She had all that she needed, and no one but the nurse knew of the fraud. The father made good his vows, and gave it the name of the grandfather: he was Iphis. The mother was delighted with the name, since it was appropriate for either gender, and no one was cheated by it.

From Dear Saint West: I Too Once Had an Unusual Name by Logan Hill:

Baby Saint, maybe you’re thinking: No way am I going to be some middle-aged man with some basic name. Well, I used to think the same thing, back when I was No. 902. Now I’m No. 13 on the list.

You know who was No. 13 in 1975? Fucking Eric.

Now I’m the Eric.

You may not want to hear this, Baby Saint, but, some day — and probably some day soon, thanks to your family’s fame — you’ll be the Eric, too.

From the book The Vicar of Wakefield (1766) by Oliver Goldsmith:

Our second child, a girl, I intended to call after her aunt Grissel; but my wife, who during her pregnancy had been reading romances, insisted upon her being called Olivia. In less than another year we had another daughter, and now I was determined that Grissel should be her name; but a rich relation taking a fancy to stand godmother, the girl was, by her directions, called Sophia; so that we had two romantic names in the family; but I solemnly protest I had no hand in it.

(Elea of British Baby Names also mentioned this passage in one of her ‘Twas Ever Thus posts.)

From an article about unique names in a 1990 issue of the Harvard Crimson:

“When I was growing up, everyone in my community knew my name,” Caraway Seed ’93 says. “Sometimes it’s a little disconcerting because a lot of people at Harvard have never met me, but know my name,” she added.

“I feel like I’m always noticed because of my name…I want people to know me for who I am,” she says.

Seed says her name was chosen by her father, who as a child was often asked “What kind of Seed are you?” In order to save his children from a similar fate, he decided to name three of them after plants: Caraway, Cotton and Huckleberry.

“I guess they just wanted to be interesting,” Seed says.

From Sunday Summary: 48/2015 by Abby of Appellation Mountain:

A few days ago, I picked him up from a [hockey] skills clinic. “Who else was there tonight?” I asked. He rattled off some names, finishing with, “… and Kelly.”

“Is Kelly a boy or a girl?”

“A boy, mom! Who names a girl Kelly?”

Mind blown.

Have you spotted any good name-related quotes/articles lately? Let me know!


Names from Copp’s Hill Burying Ground in Boston

Another cemetery!

The most bizarre name I spotted while reading through headstone inscriptions from Copp’s Hill Burying Ground (est. 1659) was Tickleemanbeck:

Tickleemanbeck, died 1702, Boston

Is that a surname or a first name? Or, was this a mononymous person? A Native American, maybe? I have no idea.

The rest of the more unusual names weren’t all that unusual, really, given the time period. Most of these occurred just once in the records:

  • A: Achsah, Ales, Almeda, Ammi, Annis, Aquila, Archibald, Artor, Asahel, Avis
  • B: Bethesda, Buckland
  • C: Cornelius, Cotton (Cotton Mather), Christiana, Christon, Custin
  • E: Edee, Eliphal, Ellsy, Esdras
  • F: Flora, Fortesque, Furnell
  • G: Gershom, Gibbins, Goodeth
  • H: Harbottle, Hemmen, Henretta, Hephsibah, Hezekiah, Hindreh (called Henry in other records), Holland, Hopestill, Hotton
  • I: Increase (Increase Mather)
  • J: Jemimia, Job, Joses, Judet
  • K: Kathron, Kezia
  • L: Lettice/Lettuce, Love
  • M: Mehetebel/Mehitabel
  • O: Obedience
  • P: Palsgrave, Pelatiah, Philander, Prissilah
  • R: Rosetta
  • S: Seeth, Sewall, Shem (Shem Drowne), Sibella, Silvanus
  • T: Tamazen, Temperance, Theodocia, Tickleemanbeck
  • W: Willmoth

Finally, here are two earlier posts with names from two more historical Boston cemeteries: King’s Chapel (est. 1630) and Granary (est. 1660).

Sources:

Names that Make Me Smile

Something fun for the end of the week! The following names never fail to brighten my day:

  • Archibald Constable (1774-1827) – Scottish publisher.
  • Cornthwaite Ommanney (1736-1801) – grandfather of Erasmus, below.
  • Cotton Tufts (1734-1815) – U.S. physician.
  • Endicott Peabody (1920-1997) – U.S. politician.
  • Erasmus Ommanney (1814-1904) – English explorer.
  • Fabiana Bravo (b. 1969) – Argentine opera singer.
  • Felix Frankfurter (1882-1965) – Supreme Court justice.
  • Felix Kirk Zollicoffer (1812-1862) – U.S. politician.
  • Filippo “Lippo” Lippi (1406-1469) – Italian painter.
  • Fritz Zwicky (1898-1974) – Swiss astronomer.
  • Gillespie Montgomery (1920-2006) – U.S. politician.
  • Gonzaga Gonza (d. 1886) – Ugandan martyr.
  • Gustavus Vasa Fox (1821-1883) – U.S. politician.
  • Halifax Shackleton – 16-year-old girl born in Halifax, Yorkshire, according to the 1911 England and Wales census.
  • Isadora Duncan (1877-1927) – U.S. dancer.
  • Morris Ketchum Jesup (1830-1908) – U.S. banker.
  • Nellie Melba (1861-1931) – Australian opera singer.
  • Otto van Veen (1556-1629) – Dutch painter.
  • Simeon Solomon (1840-1905) – English painter.
  • Stirling Silliphant (1918-1996) – U.S. screenwriter.
  • Tranquilino Luna (1849-1892) – U.S. politician.
  • Wambly Bald (1902-1990) – U.S. writer/columnist.
  • Wynkyn de Worde (d. 1534) – French printer. (The surname refers to a location in France, not words on the page, but it’s a great name anyway.)

Do you have any favorite names?

Phone Book Fishing in Mississippi, Part 6 – Clevester, Farold, Hix, Wilvie

Did you know that Kilgore Trout lives in Mississippi?

Kilgore Trout

It could be a joke, or it could be a real name. I have no idea. All I know is that I didn’t think anyone would believe me unless I posted a photo. :)

Other interesting names I found in the Hattiesburg section of the Mississippi phone book are below. (As usual, my favorites are in bold.)

Abbass
Adillia
Algarine
Alkeenia
Alpheaus
Altonyala
Amelai
Andronneka
Anise
Antelmo
Anzetta
Aonji
Aouida
Atheer
Athlene
Auxi
Averia
Ayeshalia
Belma
Berek
Bevonia
Bolynn
Bootsy
Breanuce
Burghard
Burlian
Caberzine
Captoria
Carestine
Cassenoe
Cavida
Chaquita
Charkarr
Cherish
Chesarea
Chezra
Chimbre
Chinica
Chinika
Cleven
Clevester
Cliffodean
Clotilee
Clydell
Comisha
Corsetta
Cotton
Coulis
Creshenda
Crimson
Curtresha
Dakala
Dardanchala
Daucenia
Dearyck
Decoffea
Deffrie
Dehoudra
Dekoshia
Delaina
Demarla
Detrick
Dondrick
Dontrez
Dorothera
Dorsetta
Eddena
Elatsky
Electa
Elixenia
Ellawese
Epitacio
Excell
Eudene
Fabulous
Famica
Fanisha
Farold
Feleafia
Festus
Florestine
Fransheka
Garlinda
Gathel
Gikita
Gladola
Glenisha
Glenneth
Glovenia
Hannelore
Heino
Herlene
Hix
Ilous
Imesia
Ion
Itaska
Janopy
Jaquely
Jeruthia
Jessiema
Jireh
J’Lyn
Johneen
Johniece
Kable
Kadandra
Karay
Kebryan
Keener
Keywanta
Kimual
Kimyanta
Kioushea
Krishond
Kylan
Lahrue
LaNae
LaNissa
Lavester
Legacy
Leketha
Leobardo
Lissa
Louester
Luartis
Lybia
Lyzle
Magnolia
Marquelene
Martrici
Maudel
Mazharul
McKenlie
Mecklin
Melaysja
Mheja
Micage
Micasio
Murtha
Nagen
Nakedia
Nakikia
Nanga
Natarsha
Nauwausa
Necoia
Needham
Nekerda
Nelcenia
Neretha
Neshanta
Nikrumah
Niyolkie
Noilette
Ognyan
Omeshia
Oneida
Onix
Orjan
Ovada
Patrict
Peanut
Pequitta
Phylistine
Picasso
Pippa
Plez
Quentice
Quill
Quitman
Randolyn
Rankin
Ranzeel
Raslyn
Raylawni
Remus
Renec
Renodda
Roddis
Rorilynn
Roweena
Rozellar
Seclester
Sedgey
Sedgie
Shaneka
Shannadoah
Shanthina
Shemshat
Shermonica
Shileria
Shiritia
Shtoria
Slay
Sondrell
Sparkman
Spellmon
Spooky
Stoy
Subrina
Sukhendra
Synarus
Synettra
Talantia
Tanangela
Tanjala
T’anna
Tannus
Tanzanzi
Tavares
Tavarius
Tawaski
Teayra
Tessecca
Texas
Theaola
Torjia
Torsky
Toxie
Treless
Trenidy
Trest
Troymane
Truett
Twannela
Twinette
Uerica
Undeva
Utahna
Vallorine
Viccki
Vonceil
Voncile
Voncille
Vyshawn
Wardelle
Wauteen
Weatta
Whakinda
Willie Glenn
Willoughby
Wilvie
Winsdale
Wirt
Wyomia
Yamilet
Yeghia
Zeakethia
Zedric
Zorana
Zykia

And that concludes this (rather extensive) round of phone book fishing. In case you missed them, here are the five earlier posts in the series: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 and Part 5.

P.S. Want to see some literature-inspired names (like Kilgore Trout)? Check out Unique Baby Names from Literature.

Phone Book Fishing in Mississippi, Part 2 – Eudell, Mae Bell, Kilfred, Puff

Here’s another batch of names from the Mississippi phone book. These come from the towns of Richton, Seminary, Soso and Sumrall. (My favorites are in bold.)

Aglaria
Albertean
Annerys
Armielena
Arthrine
Arzo
Asielean
Belivia
Bura
Cadella
Callise
Capitola
Christl
Claytor
Cotton
Darrick
Dearld
Dessare
Dimple
Dymple
Eliosuse
Ellaphine
Eudell
Eulle
Feleasha
Flicka
Florestine
Gertrue
Glancy
Grissett
Jenus
Jhaheneria
Keano
Kethni
Kilfred
Kniok
LeDeam
Lefroid
Lessray
Mae Bell
Marsea
Mecklyn
Micenia
Monolisa
Nadinia
Odius
Ovee
Pepper
Puff
Raemeace
Regenner
Raford
Readonna
Rhnee
Sheletha
Solciris
Survina
Talmage
Talmus
Tammer
Tasheba
Tinker
Tlinda
Toxie
Turpin
Ulis
Ulmer
Undra
Vaster
Vation
Wilmer
Zeda

Dimple, Dymple and Toxie were also on yesterday’s list.