How popular is the baby name Cuthbert in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Cuthbert.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Cuthbert


Posts that Mention the Name Cuthbert

Babies Named for Sailing Ships (O)

The people below were born aboard — and named after! — ships with O-names…

  • Oaklands:
    • Ivo Oaklands Rowe, born in 1877
    • George Oaklands Southam, born in 1877
    • John Fuller Oaklands Munn, born in 1877
    • Geneva Oaklands Perry, born in 1877
    • Beatrice Sarah Oaklands Simons, born in 1877
  • Oceanic:
    • Catherine Oceanica Bernter, born in 1874
  • Octavia:
    • William Octavius Foster, born in 1857
  • Olago:
    • Olago William Holliday, born in 1883
  • Olbers:
    • Kate Mary Olbers Scott, born in 1878
    • Francisco Olbers Ferera, born in 1879
    • Mary Louisa Olbers Mansell, born in 1884
  • Lady Olive:
    • Eliza Olive Frazer, born in 1881
  • Olympia:
    • Mary Anne Olympia Sullivan, born in 1872
    • Olympia Sanna, born in 1880
    • Olympia Cataneza, born in 1886
  • Lake Ontario:
    • Jennie Ontario Bottomley, born in 1888
  • Opawa:
    • Caroline Opawa Langford, born in 1878
    • George Frederick Opawa Whittlestone, born in 1879
  • Orari:
    • Annie Orari Mosey Andrews Kelly, born in 1876
    • Albert Orari Smith, born in 1876
    • Robert Cotton Orari Garratt, born in 1878
    • Mary Orari Kenney, born in 1879
  • Oregon:
    • James Oregon Tansley, born in 1887
    • Anna Oregonia Larsen, born in 1887
  • Orient:
    • Orient Elizabeth Searle, born in 1871
    • Annie Orient Smith, born in 1889
  • Orizaba:
    • William Orizaba Brown, born in 1887
    • May Orizoba Curtiss, born in 1891
  • Orotava:
    • Ethel Orotavia Morris, born in 1891
  • Oroya:
    • Oroya Fletcher, born in 1889
  • Otago:
    • Otago J. Shearer, born in 1882
    • Otago William Holliday, born in 1883
    • Andrew Otago McCulloch, born in 1884
  • Oxford:
    • William Cuthbert Oxford Morse, born in 1876
    • John William Ackerman Oxford Booth, born in 1877
    • Charles Oxford Stubbs, born in 1881

Do you think any of the ship names above work particularly well as human names?

Source: FamilySearch.org

Popular Baby Names in England and Wales, 2015

According to data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the most popular baby names in England and Wales last year were (again) Amelia and Oliver.

Here are the top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2015:

Girl NamesBoy Names
1. Amelia, 5,158 baby girls
2. Olivia, 4,853
3. Emily, 3,893
4. Isla, 3,474
5. Ava, 3,414
6. Ella, 3,028
7. Jessica, 2,937
8. Isabella, 2,876
9. Mia, 2,842
10. Poppy, 2,816
1. Oliver, 6,941 baby boys
2. Jack, 5,371
3. Harry, 5,308
4. George, 4,869
5. Jacob, 4,850
6. Charlie, 4,831
7. Noah, 4,148
8. William, 4,083
9. Thomas, 4,075
10. Oscar, 4,066

In the girls’ top 10, Ella and Mia replaced Lily (now 13th) and Sophie (now 11th).

In the boys’ top 10, Noah (the top name in the U.S. right now) replaced James (11th).

In the girls’ top 100, Penelope, Mila, Clara, Arabella, Maddison and Aria replaced Lydia (now 103rd), Faith (104th), Mollie (105th), Brooke (107th), Isabel (110th) and Amy (117th).

In the boys’ top 100, Jaxon, Roman, Reggie and Carter replaced Owen (now 101st), Robert (105th), Joey (117th) and Finlay (123rd).

Here are some of last year’s rare baby names, each given to either 3, 4 or 5 babies:

Rare Girl NamesRare Boy Names
Aarzoo, Autumn-Lily, Boglarka, Comfort, Edna, Enxi, Euphemia, Flourish, Fozia, Gabia, Jupiter, Lady, Lleucu, Llio, Merveille, Nectaria, Pebbles, Peony, Prisca, Purity, Quorra, Reisel, Sloka, Tuba, Venice, Vimbainashe, YlvaAlffi, Bam, Bright, Crimea, Cuthbert, Efezino, Elimelech, Fyfe, Ghyll, Gryff, James-Dean, Jamesdean, Kushagra, Ignatius, Marmaduke, Math, Mio, Osagie, Otso, Pip, Przemyslaw, Sherlock, Swayley, Ringo, Testimony, Thierno, Zephyrus

(Crimea is intriguing, isn’t it? It was used as a baby name in the 1850s, during the Crimean War, but this is the first time I’ve seen it on a modern name list.)

And what about Welsh names?

Welsh Girl NamesWelsh Boy Names
  • Seren (“star”) ranks 17th in Wales
  • Ffion (“foxglove”), 20th
  • Megan, 27th
    • & 76th overall
  • Mali, 45th
  • Alys, 66th
  • Carys (“love”), 72nd
  • Efa, 73rd
  • Cadi, 82nd
  • Lili, 85th
  • Lowri, 88th
  • Eira (“snow”), 92nd
  • Ela, 97th
  • Elin, 97th
  • Dylan ranks 13th in Wales
    • & 38th overall
  • Osian, 25th
  • Harri, 27th
  • Jac, 33rd
  • Rhys, 34th
  • Evan, 37th
  • Tomos, 47th
  • Cai, 51st
  • Ioan, 56th
  • Morgan, 67th
  • Elis, 66th
  • Hari, 82nd
  • Gethin (“swarthy”), 88th
  • Iestyn, 88th
  • Macsen, 92nd
  • Owain, 92nd
  • Ifan, 96th

Finally, if you’d like to go back another year, here are the England and Wales rankings for 2014.

Source: Baby names in England and Wales: 2015

Some Unusual Names: Saba, Mareli, Marella, Marmary

While putting together Monday’s post on Louvima, I found a few other interesting names in Notes & Queries, so I thought I’d do a follow-up post.

Mr. Cuthbert Bede, the person who started the N&Q conversation on Louvima, actually had more to say about unusual names. Here’s the rest of his letter:

It may be remembered that Sydney Smith invented a new name, Saba, for his daughter (‘Memoirs,’ vol. i p. 22). I once invented a name, Mareli, which was intended as an amalgam of the names Mary Elizabeth. I did this for the purposes of a little story, in which the father of the baby girl has asked two wealthy maiden aunts to be the two godmothers; and he proposes to call the baby Mary Elizabeth; after the respective Christian names of the two aunts. Miss Mary Ricketts consents to this, and promises to give her godchild a handsome present. Miss Elizabeth Meagrim will do the same, provided that the baby is named Elizabeth Mary instead of Mary Elizabeth. Miss Ricketts will no yield; and at the last the father finds a way out of the difficulty by inventing the amalgam Mareli, with which combination the two aunts are satisfied. This little tale was published in a six-shilling volume, ‘The Curate of Cranston, with other Prose and Verse,’ by Cuthbert Bede (Saunders, Otley & Co., 1862). In the obituary of the Times, April 2, 1870, appeared the following;–

“On the 30th ult. at Eastbourne Priory, near Midhurst, Mary Elizabeth (Mareli), third daughter of Francis and Martha Tallant, in her ninth year.”

I conclude that the parents had read my story, and called their child Mareli as a pet name.

The next month, two responses were printed. One was from J. M. Cowper:

Cuthbert Bede’s note on this name reminds me of similar Christian names I have met with while preparing the registers of St. Alphage, Canterbury, for the press. In 1706 Louina Backer was baptized, where probably u=v. If so the name is Lovina. In 1730 Lovevina Cooper was christened, and in 1769 I find a Levina Cramp. Possibly the whole of these may be variants of Lavinia. If not, the first and second go far to prove that Sir Francis Knollys has narrowly escaped “appropriating” an invention of the last century.

The other was from E. Venables:

“Pereant qui ante nos nostra dixerunt.” If Cuthbert Bede coined the name Mareli for one of his fictitious heroines, a very similar name was coined for a real person long before his facile and amusing pen began to be exercised. A lady well known to visitors of Ventnor thirty or forty years ago, the wife of Rev. J. Noble Coleman, incumbent of St. Catherine’s Church, bore the name “Marella,” which was evidently formed in the same way by the combination of portions of two Christian names. I can mention another example. When dining, five-and-thirty years back, wich that excellent archaeologist and accurate editor the late H. T. Riley, I met a young lady who, to my surprise, answered to the name “Marmary.” Asking my host whether I had heard the name aright, he told me that the young lady had been so called after two godmothers, one of whom was named Martha, and the other Mary, her own name combining the two.

Here’s a little more information on Saba: She was born in 1802 and her father, Sydney Smith, was a well-known clergyman and writer. According to a biography of Sydney Smith, Saba was a place-name picked out of the Bible (Psalm 72:10). The name “was bestowed on her in obedience to her father’s conviction that, where parents were constrained to give their child so indistinctive a surname as Smith, they ought to counterbalance it with a Christian name more original and vivacious.”

Sources:

  • Bede, Cuthbert. “Louvima, a New Christian Name.” Notes & Queries 7 Jul. 1888: 6.
  • Cowper, J. M. “Louvima, a New Christian Name.” Notes & Queries 4 Aug. 1888: 97.
  • Russell, George W. E. Sydney Smith. London: Macmillan, 1905.
  • Venables, E. “Louvima, a New Christian Name.” 4 Aug. 1888: 97-98.