How popular is the baby name Dagny in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Dagny and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Dagny.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Dagny

Number of Babies Named Dagny

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Dagny

Baby Name Needed – What Do You Think of Phineas?

A reader named Virginia is expecting a baby in September. For a boy, she’d selected the name Phineas. She liked “that it was unusual without being bizarre,” and that it started with ph. But now she’s not so sure about the name:

All was fine and dandy until I read an article about violence in the Bible. It vaguely mentioned Phineas as a name from the Bible used as a talisman by white supremacists. What!?!

That was a shock to me too. According to the Anti-Defamation League, the Phineas Priesthood is “a violent credo of vengeance that has gained some popularity among white supremacists and other extremists in recent years.” I’d never heard of the Phineas Priesthood before–not even when Julia Roberts named her son Phinnaeus a few years ago.

Virginia doesn’t want to give up her favorite name, but she also “can’t live with such an association,” so she was hoping for some name suggestions. Other names she’s considering include Joel and Samuel (for boys) and Sigrid, Phoebe, Elisabeth, and Anne (for girls). All are family names.

First, a few thoughts:

  • I doubt many people are aware that white supremacists use Phineas as a code word. It’s an odious association, but maybe it’s also obscure enough that it’s not worth worrying about…?
  • I really like Sigrid and Phoebe–they’re both significant and unusual. Especially Sigrid. (Phoebe is being used more and more every year, so it might not be unusual for long.)

And now, name suggestions. Here are some unusual-but-not-bizarre boy names that I think Virginia might like:


And some girl names:


What other names would you suggest to Virginia? (And, what’s your take on the Phineas dilemma?)

Update: The baby has arrived! Click here to learn the baby’s name.

Baby Name Needed – Libertarian Boy Name for First Baby

Last week, a reader named Julie sent me a fascinating e-mail:

My husband and I are trying to figure out what we want to name our first child. We have a girl’s name (Darby) but a boy would be a real problem.

The name he really really wants is Hayek (after 18th century economist – Friedrich Augustus Hayek – surely you’ve heard of him…no? really?).

He also likes “T”. Just the letter. Perfect because it works for a boy OR a girl.

His third option is Atlas from Atlas Shrugged.

I am not a fan of any of these. I am looking for a name that’s not super-traditional, but also isn’t on the Top 100 names list. I also think it’s unfair to give the child a name they constantly have to spell/pronounce/explain.

Our last name starts with an “M” and ends in a “ee” sound, so names that also end in the “ee” sound sing-songy.

Julie tried giving her husband the following list of names: Archer, Barrett, Campbell, Dexter, Dixon, Duncan, Everett, Felix, Fletcher, Flint, Ford, Gardner, Garrett, Gibson, Grady, Griffin, Holt, Langston, Leo, Lincoln, Marshall, Parker, Powell, Quentin, Tate, Weston, Zane. He didn’t care for any of them.

This is a tricky situation, but I think there’s a bright side. Julie and her husband seem to be looking at baby names from two different angles. Julie’s husband is focusing on significance, while Julie is more concerned about style. This is a good thing; I’m sure there are names out there that could satisfy both of them.

I think best way to tackle this would be to start with the more constrictive angle–significance. I’d say collect as many meaningful names as possible, then look for stylish names among them. That way, both parents get something they like.

I don’t know Julie’s husband, so I can’t say for certain what names he’d find meaningful. But I can make inferences based on his current top three. Here are some ideas:

1. Hayek

  • How about variants of Hayek’s first or middle name? Friedrich could be Frederick, Fred or Fritz. August could be Augustine, Gus or Austin.
  • Hayek chose the name Laurence Joseph Heinrich for his own son. Would any of those work?
  • I think many people will assume that Hayek was inspired by actress Salma Hayek. Is Julie’s husband okay with that association?
  • What other economists does Julie’s husband admire? Would any of their names work as a baby name?

2. T

  • I can’t say much about this one, but I wonder: Does it stand for anything? If there’s a story behind it, what other (more traditional) names could be teased out of that story?

3. Atlas

  • I think several characters in Atlas Shrugged would be good symbols of the book itself. (Even better than “Atlas,” which is more likely to make people think of myths or maps.)
    • John Galt. The name John probably won’t appeal to Julie, but what about Galt? (Galt isn’t far from Holt, which is on Julie’s list.)
    • Hank Rearden. Henry, like John, could be too popular/traditional for Julie’s tastes. But Rearden might work.
    • Dagny Taggart, the female protagonist. Taggart could be a cool name. Nickname could be Tag. (Or even T!)
    • Ellis Wyatt, Quentin Daniels and Hugh Akston are minor characters with good names. In fact, Quentin is already on Julie’s list. (Maybe Julie’s husband would like it more if he were reminded about the Rand reference?)
  • How about an author-inspired name? Randall, Randolph or even Rand itself.
  • What other writers and philosophers does Julie’s husband admire? Would any of their names (or character names) work as a baby name? What about other book titles?

Finally, if Julie and her husband can’t come to an agreement on the first name, I’d suggest a compromise using the middle name. Perhaps one of Julie’s names could come first, then Hayek or T or Atlas could come second.

What other ideas would you offer Julie?

New Year’s Baby Names – Dagny, Gregory, Milada, Sylvester

Is your baby due sometime near New Year’s Day? Here’s a selection of name day and saint day names to consider:

  • December 29th – David (France), Milada (Slovakia), Tamás and Tamara (Hungarian), Thomas (Anglican; Roman Catholic)
  • December 30th – Abel (Sweden), David (various countries), Josephine (Church of England), Roger (France)
  • December 31st – Colombe (France), John (Anglican), Sylvester (various countries; Roman Catholic)
  • January 1st – Fruzsina (Hungarian), Vasil and Vasilena (Bulgaria)
  • January 2nd – Alexandra (Slovakia), Basil and Gregory (Anglican; Roman Catholic), Beatrix (Germany), Eliza (Anglican Church of Australia), Johann (Lutheran), Svea (Sweden)
  • January 3rd – Alfred (Sweden), Benjámin (Hungary), Daniela (Slovakia), Elmer (Finnish), Geneviève (France)
  • January 4th – Anastasia (Russia), Odilon (France), Rygobert (Polish), Titusz (Hungary)

Another fitting choice (especially if you’re an Ayn Rand fan) would be Dagny, which consists of two Old Norse words meaning “day” and “new” — hence, “new day.”

One-Hit Wonder Baby Names from the 1900s (’00-’09)

The names below are one-hit wonder names that ranked among the 1,000 most popular U.S. baby names only once — sometime between 1900 and 1909 (inclusive).


  • 1900 – Luvinia
  • 1901 – Dagny, Ethyle
  • 1903 – Augustina, Girtha
  • 1904 – Edris, Vernia
  • 1905 – Beadie, Ilda, Neola, Orma, Vela
  • 1907 – Clydie, Rosabelle, Theta
  • 1908 – Arnetta, Clementina, Launa
  • 1909 – Azalee, Macel


  • 1900 – Goebel (influence: William Goebel), Tallie
  • 1901 – Ancil, Buren, Erland, Esco, Mathews, Pate
  • 1902 – Doll, Ivor, Victoriano
  • 1903 – Beckham, Lenon, Ozzie, Teddie
  • 1904 – Arbie, Council, Duard, Harm, Severo, Tobie
  • 1905 – Fredie, Graydon, Jiles
  • 1906 – Benard, Harrold
  • 1907 – Delmus, Delphin (influence: Delphin Delmas), Gilmer, Ogden, Oland, Samie
  • 1908 – Esker, Levie, Robley (influence: Robley Evans)
  • 1909 – Othel

I think both Beckham (1903) and Graydon (1905) could really appeal to modern parents — Beckham for its association with soccer star David Beckham, Graydon for its similarity to currently popular names like Grayson and Jayden.

All one-hit wonder lists: 1880s, 1890s, 1900s, 1910s, 1920s, 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, 2000s.