How popular is the baby name Darth in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Darth and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Darth.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.


Popularity of the Baby Name Darth

Number of Babies Named Darth

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Darth

Most Popular U.S. Baby Names of 2016

baby names, popular, 2016, US

According to the Social Security Administration, Emma and Noah were the most popular baby names in the United States in 2016.

Here are the top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names:

Girl Names
1. Emma, 19,414 baby girls (same rank as in 2015)
2. Olivia, 19,246 (same rank)
3. Ava, 16,237 (up from 4th)
4. Sophia, 16,070 (down from 3rd)
5. Isabella, 14,722 (same rank)
6. Mia, 14,366 (same rank)
7. Charlotte, 13,030 (up from 9th)
8. Abigail, 11,699 (down from 7th)
9. Emily, 10,926 (down from 8th)
10. Harper, 10,733 (same rank)

Boy Names
1. Noah, 19,015 baby boys (same rank as in 2015)
2. Liam, 18,138 (same rank)
3. William, 15,668 (up from 5th)
4. Mason, 15,192 (down from 3rd)
5. James, 14,776 (up from 7th)
6. Benjamin, 14,569 (up from 10th)
7. Jacob, 14,416 (down from 4th)
8. Michael, 13,998 (up from 9th)
9. Elijah, 13,764 (up from 11th)
10. Ethan, 13,758 (down from 6th)

Emma and Noah were also the #1 names in 2015 and in 2014.

Elijah replaces Alexander (now 11th) in the boys’ top 10. No replacements in the girls’ top 10.

Here’s more from the SSA’s press release:

Each year, the list reveals the effect of pop-culture on naming trends. This year’s winners for biggest jump in popularity in the Top 1,000 are Kehlani and Kylo.

Kehlani rose 2,487 spots on the girls’ side to number 872, from number 3,359 in 2015. Perhaps this can be attributed to Kehlani Parrish, a singer/songwriter who was nominated for a Grammy in 2016. She was named an artist to watch and clearly new parents agree her star is rising. Kehlani collaborated with Zayn Malik, the former One Direction star and current solo artist, on a song in 2016. The name Zayn also made the boys fastest riser list.

The force was strong for Kylo in 2016 as he soared 2,368 spots for the boys, from number 3,269 in 2015 to number 901. Kylo Ren, the son of Han Solo and Princess Leia and the grandson of Darth Vader, was a character in the 2015 film Star Wars: The Force Awakens. Perhaps Kylo can continue to harness the force and climb even higher in the coming years.

The second fastest riser for girls was Royalty. The royal family likely had something to do with this increase in popularity, or the 2015 World Series champions, the Kansas City Royals, may have influenced parents-to-be.

For boys, it was Creed. This could be attributed to the return to the silver screen of America’s favorite boxer Rocky Balboa in the 2015 movie Creed, where Rocky trains and mentors Adonis Johnson Creed, the son of his late friend and boxing rival, Apollo Creed. The name Adonis just happens to be the number four fastest riser on the list for boys.

Regarding Royalty, the inspiration was much more likely R&B singer Chris Brown. His daughter Royalty, born in mid-2014, was featured on the cover of his album Royalty, released at the end of 2015.

More analysis coming soon!

Source: Emma and Noah Remain Social Security’s Most Popular Baby Names for 2016


Name Quotes for the Weekend #39

Quote from Uzo Aduba's mother on the name Uzoamaka

From “The Eyes Have It,” an interview with Orange Is the New Black actress Uzoamaka “Uzo” Aduba, who was asked whether she ever considered changing her name:

When I started as an actor? No, and I’ll tell you why. I had already gone through that. My family is from Nigeria, and my full name is Uzoamaka, which means “The road is good.” Quick lesson: My tribe is Igbo, and you name your kid something that tells your history and hopefully predicts your future. So anyway, in grade school, because my last name started with an A, I was the first in roll call, and nobody ever knew how to pronounce it. So I went home and asked my mother if I could be called Zoe. I remember she was cooking, and in her Nigerian accent she said, “Why?” I said, “Nobody can pronounce it.” Without missing a beat, she said, “If they can learn to say Tchaikovsky and Michelangelo and Dostoyevsky, they can learn to say Uzoamaka.”

(There’s a Tchaikovsky in Brazil.)

From an article about a woman named Cinderella in the Irish Independent:

“I’d been living as Eva my whole life until I found out my name was Evangeline Cinderella. Of course this was the most amazing news as a seven year old girl and unfortunately I told everybody. I’ve paid for it ever since. People have always remembered,” she said.

From the essay “The name shame of Axl, Anakin, Arya…” by Gene Weingarten (via Name News):

To consult this list [the SSA’s Change in Popularity list] is to dip your toe into the fetid waters of cheesy celebrity worship. Consider this: One of the skyrocketing names is … “Anakin.” Yes, people are giving their baby boys a name invented specifically to sound non-human, for a character in another galaxy far, far away, one who grows up to become Darth Vader, an evil overlord who wants to enslave the universe. (There have been plenty of Darths, too.)

(Here’s more on Darth.)

From the video “Instrument: Celeste” featuring keyboardist Elizabeth Burley of the Philharmonia Orchestra of London:

I’ve got a celeste here today to show you how that works. As you’ll see it looks a little bit like an upright piano, but it’s actually a lot different. Although it’s operated by a keyboard, inside, instead of strings, it’s a set of…metal chime bars. They’re suspended over wooden resonating boxes, and when I press a key, a hammer hits the chime bar to make the sound, like on a piano the hammer would hit the string. The name celeste…it’s a French name meaning “heavenly,” and it does make a very heavenly sound, as you’ll hear.

From a blog post about electronic music pioneer Delia Derbyshire at Open Culture:

With her buttoned-up style, work with the UN, and name like a plucky character in a certain English wizard series, Delia Derbyshire may not seem a likely pioneer of experimental electronic music.

From the blog post “What’s in a Name?” by theology professor/social activist Rev. Dr. Miguel A. De La Torre:

Today, no one calls me Brother Mike. Nonetheless, if the first act of liberation is self naming, why do I still insist on spelling my surname the way those who had power over me taught me? I have no doubt the reader is probably wondering what’s the big deal? Just spell my name correctly. What they fail to recognize is the power of the colonizing process, and the difficulty to reclaim identity. So as I tag my name to my liberationist works I am reminded with each upper case letter how far I still need to go to claim my own liberation. The struggle, la lucha, continues, even in the letters of my name.

From the article “What Your Conference Room Names Say About Your Company Culture” by Ekaterina Walter:

At Sprinklr, our conference rooms are named after the company’s values. Honesty, Passion, Perseverance, Humility, Character, Courage, and Integrity are just some of the names you will encounter. My personal favorites are Awesomeness and 1+1=3. When I asked our founder, Ragy Thomas, why the leadership team chose to name conference rooms in this way, he said: “It would be kind of hard to be arrogant in a room named Humility, wouldn’t it? Or give up in a room named Perseverance, don’t you think?”

From the New York Times article “Jens and Vita, but Molli? Danes Favor Common Names” (2004) about Denmark’s Law on Personal Names, which was “initially designed to bring order to surnames”:

Then in the 1960’s, a furor erupted over the first name Tessa, which resembled tisse, which means to urinate in Danish. Distressed over the lack of direction in the law, the Danish government expanded the statute to grapple with first names. Now the law is as long as an average-size book.

Among the baby names rejected in Denmark: Anus, Pluto, and Monkey. Among those accepted: Leica, Benji, Jiminico, and Fee.

Want more quotes? Here’s the name quotes category.

My 10 Favorite Uniquely ’70s Baby Names

70s baby names (willona vs darth)

Love 1970s pop culture? Love names? Then check out this list!

Out of the more than 12,000 baby names that debuted on the charts during the ’70s, here are 10 (well, 11) that are particularly symbolic of the decade. All are legit baby names!

  1. Darth. The baby name Darth, inspired by movie villain Darth Vader, debuted on the baby name charts in 1977.
  2. Travolta. The baby name Travolta, inspired by actor John Travolta, debuted on the baby name charts in 1978.
  3. Shaft. The baby name Shaft, inspired by movie character Shaft, debuted on the baby name charts in 1971.
  4. Willona. The baby name Willona, inspired by TV character Willona Woods, debuted on the baby name charts in 1974.
  5. Jorel. The baby name Jorel, inspired by movie character Jor-El, debuted on the baby name charts in 1979.
  6. Rhiannon. The baby name Rhiannon, popularized by Fleetwood Mac song “Rhiannon,” debuted on the baby name charts in 1974.
  7. Starsky & Hutch. The baby names Starsky and Hutch, inspired by the TV show Starsky & Hutch, both debuted on the baby name charts in 1975.
  8. Comaneci. The baby name Comaneci, inspired by gymnast Nadia Comaneci, debuted on the baby name charts in 1976.
  9. Uhura. The baby name Uhura, inspired by TV character Lt. Uhura, debuted on the baby name charts in 1971.
  10. Atari. The baby name Atari, inspired by the Atari game console, debuted on the boys’ side of the baby name charts in 1979. (This one’s actually a borderline case, as it debuted for girls in 1980.)

Not-very-honorable mention goes to my least favorite uniquely ’70s name, Yarnell. She’s the mime lady who haunts my dreams…

Do YOU have any favorite ’70s baby names?

P.S. Here are my 10 favorite uniquely ’80s and ’90s baby names.

Note: Updated in March of 2015.

The Baby Name Shaft – Can You Dig It?

shaft movie poster“They say this cat Shaft is a bad mother…shut your mouth!”

I doubted the existence of the baby name Shaft at first. Same as I doubted Rambo, and MacGyver, and Darth.

“For real? Babies named Shaft? I don’t think so.”

After all that I’ve seen, though, I don’t know why I still bother doubting.

Babies have indeed been named Shaft. Dozens of babies, in fact.

The baby name Shaft debuted on the SSA’s list in 1971, the same year the movie Shaft was released:

  • 1975: 7 baby boys named Shaft
  • 1974: 9 baby boys named Shaft
  • 1973: 16 baby boys named Shaft
  • 1972: 31 baby boys named Shaft
  • 1971: 22 baby boys named Shaft [debut]
  • 1970: unlisted

And did you know Shaft had sequels? Shaft’s Big Score in 1972 and Shaft in Africa in 1973. In all three movies, private detective John Shaft was played by actor Richard Roundtree.

I’ve found other ’70s baby names inspired by blaxploitation films, but none are as shocking as Shaft. They include Coffy, Foxy and Sheba, inspired by the Pam Grier movies Coffy (1973), Foxy Brown (1974) and Sheba, Baby (1975).

How Many Babies Were Named After Darth Vader?

Darth Vader photoI’m sure you knew that Star Wars gave a boost to the baby names Luke and Leia. But did you know that it also influenced a handful of parents to name their babies Darth?

Yup, Darth. As in Darth Vader. As in the Jedi-gone-bad who was the main antagonist of the original Star Wars trilogy.

The first Star Wars film was released in 1977, and that’s the year we start seeing baby Darths pop up:

  • 1980: unlisted
  • 1979: 7 baby boys named Darth
  • 1978: 13 baby boys named Darth
  • 1977: 9 baby boys named Darth [debut]
  • 1976: unlisted

But the Force wasn’t strong with this one. The name Darth didn’t stay on the SSA’s baby name the list long enough to see the release of the second film, The Empire Strikes Back, in 1980.

So where does the word Darth come from? It’s a title used by a number Sith Lords in the fictional Star Wars universe. Whoever wrote the Darth Vader’s Wiktionary page is guessing that Darth is a blend of “dark” and either “Sith” or “death,” but only George Lucas knows for sure how the word was concocted.

P.S. Did you know that vader means “father” in various Germanic languages?