How popular is the baby name David in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to David and check out all the blog posts that mention the name David.

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Popularity of the Baby Name David

Number of Babies Named David

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name David

Popular Baby Names in Switzerland, 2016

According to data from the Swiss Federal Statistical Office (OFS), the most popular baby names in Switzerland last year were Mia and Noah.

Here are the country’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Mia, 488 baby girls
2. Emma, 446
3. Elena, 327
4. Sofia, 318
5. Lena, 308
6. Emilia, 296 [tie]
6. Lara, 296 [tie]
8. Anna, 292
9. Laura, 291 [tie]
9. Mila, 291 [tie]

Boy Names
1. Noah, 477 baby boys
2. Liam, 433
3. Gabriel, 345 [tie]
3. Luca, 345 [tie]
5. Leon, 337
6. Elias, 314
7. David, 302
8. Samuel, 296
9. Louis, 288
10. Julian, 276

In 2015, the top names were also Mia and Noah.

In the girls’ top 10, Emilia replaces Lina.

In the boys’ top 10, Samuel and Julian replace Matteo and Levin.

Here are the top baby names per gender within each of Switzerland’s main language groups:

  • German speakers (64% of Switzerland)
    • Top 3 girl names: Mia, Emma, Emilia
    • Top 3 boy names: Noah, Leon, Luca
  • French speakers (23%)
    • Top 3 girl names: Emma, Alice, Eva
    • Top 3 boy names: Gabriel, Liam, Louis
  • Italian speakers (8%)
    • Top 3 girl names: Sofia, Giulia, Mia/Sophie (tie)
    • Top 3 boy names: Leonardo, Liam, Enea
  • Romansh speakers (less than 1%)
    • Top girl name: Valentina
    • Top boy name: Laurin

Sources: Vornamen der Neugeborenen, Noah and Mia most popular baby names in Switzerland


Popular Baby Names in Los Angeles County, CA, 2013

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health website doesn’t have baby name data for 2016, but it does have data covering 1995 to 2013, so let’s work with that.

The most popular baby names in Los Angeles County in 2013 were Sophia and Jacob. Here are L.A.’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2013:

Girl Names
1. Sophia, 984 baby girls
2. Isabella, 777
3. Mia, 762
4. Emily, 688
5. Emma, 609
6. Sofia, 550
7. Olivia, 473
8. Samantha, 458
9. Victoria, 410
10. Camila, 405

Boy Names
1. Jacob, 948 baby boys
2. Jayden, 926
3. Matthew, 895
4. Ethan, 829
5. Daniel, 784
6. Nathan, 761
7. Noah, 657
8. Anthony, 633
9. Alexander, 617
10. David, 600

And here are some of the baby names that were apparently used just once in L.A. from 1995 to 2013:

Unique Girl Names Unique Boy Names
Aijia, Bobbierose, Coakley, Dashley, Ella-Lily, Fallen Star, Georgedith, Haydeline, Ilynne, Jatalia, Khando, Luna Sol, Mexeen, Nonoka, Ofri, Purple, Qiqi, Rhofanie, Sloka, Ting, Ulani, Vixi, Wonder, Xanterra, Yudibeth, Zayleen Abbos, Banksy, Clifford, Dro, Exsol, Foxton, Guster, Holtzen, Iniesta, Jayden-Dreden, Kayd, Leviathan, Mondrick, Noaz, Ordisi, Pocky, Querbin, Rundy, Snayther, Tarzis, Uyedon, Verwyn, Westgene, Xinran, Yitzchack, Zander Ray

Want to see more California baby names? Here are Sonoma’s rankings for 2015 and San Diego’s rankings for 2016.

Source: Find a Baby Name – L.A. County Public Health

Popular Baby Names in Hungary, 2016

According to data from the Hungary’s Ministry of the Interior (Belügyminisztérium), the most popular baby names in Hungary in 2016 were Hanna and Bence.

Here are Hungary’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Hanna, 1,669 baby girls
2. Anna, 1,206
3. Jázmin, 866
4. Zsófia, 856
5. Zoé, 833
6. Lili, 764
7. Boglárka, 762 – Boglárka is Hungarian for “buttercup.”
8. Luca, 760
9. Emma, 742
10. Léna, 697

Boy Names
1. Bence, 1,800 baby boys – Bence is a form of Vincent.
2. Máté, 1,321
3. Levente, 1,280 – Levente might be based on the Hungarian verb lesz, meaning “will be.”
4. Dominik, 1,173
5. Marcell, 1,146
6. Dávid, 1,123
7. Ádám, 1,117
8. Noel, 1,071
9. Dániel, 1,054
10. Milán, 1,037

In the girls’ top 10, Léna replaces Nóra. In the boys’ top 10, Noel replaces Áron. (Interestingly, the two “replaced” names — if we ignore diacritical marks — are anagrams of one another. They’re palindromic, in fact.)

And how is the name Attila faring in Hungary these days? Here’s the data for the last few years:

  • 2016: Attila ranked 27th (569 baby boys)
  • 2015: Attila ranked 25th (568 baby boys)
  • 2014: Attila ranked 26th (560 baby boys)
  • 2013: Attila ranked 26th (552 baby boys)

Source: Statistics – Hungary’s Deputy State Secretariat for the Administration of the Ministry of the Interior (via Maybe It Is Daijiro)

Popular Baby Names in Spain, 2016

According to data released on June 22nd by Spain’s Instituto Nacional de Estadistica, the most popular baby names in Spain in 2016 were (again) Lucia and Hugo.

Here are Spain’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Lucia, 4,672 baby girls
2. Martina, 4,308
3. Maria, 4,143
4. Sofia, 4,047
5. Paula, 3,439
6. Daniela, 3,151
7. Valeria, 3,110
8. Alba, 3,042
9. Julia, 2,992
10. Noa, 2,888

Boy Names
1. Hugo, 4,870 baby boys
2. Daniel, 4,195
3. Martin, 4,050
4. Pablo, 3,776
5. Alejandro, 3,774
6. Lucas, 3,730
7. Alvaro, 3,030
8. Adrian, 2,989
9. Mateo, 2,845
10. David, 2,818

In the girls’ top 10, Valeria and Noa replace Sara and Carla (now 11th and 12th).

In the boys’ top 10, Mateo replaces Mario (now 11th).

Here are the 2015 rankings, if you’d like to compare.

Source: Nombres de los recién nacidos – INEbase

Name Quotes #53: DeVante, Ella, Buffalo

Time for some name quotes!

From a Movie Pilot interview with John Knoll, who came up with the name for Rogue One character Jyn Erso:

“My youngest daughter is Jane, and my wife is Jen, so [Jyn] is sort of mashup of them. And growing up my aunt was Aunt Ginny, [short] for Virginia, so there’s a little bit of that, too. It’s a mix up of a lot of my favorite women in my life.”

[Do you think Jyn will debut in the SSA data in 2017?]

From an A.V. Club review of the Black-ish episode “The Name Game,” in which characters argued about the name DeVante:

Dre’s point that names like Matthew, David, and Kevin don’t mean anything to him is fair. He wants to name his son after the actual culture and people he grew up around, and he hates the fact that when “something is black the world thinks that it’s bad.” Appeasing white culture with a name that has no cultural signifiers creates the type of internalized hatred that causes characters like Ruby and Charlie to respond so negatively to black names.

From a Telegraph essay by Sophia Money-Coutts about how absurd names build character:

But it’s enormously character building, being given an absurd name. It teaches you fortitude and tolerance because you will have to explain it 73 times a day. No use in labelling your children as George and Amal Clooney have just done. They’ve called their twins Ella and Alexander. I mean, they’re all right. Ella will probably grow up to be a florist or a yoga teacher and Alexander sounds like he might sell houses in Fulham. But what is life if you don’t grow up justifying your name to everyone you meet? Being called something silly means you can never take yourself too seriously.

From a Seattle Times article about what it’s like to share the name Alexa with the Amazon device:

Even though she’s never been on the receiving end of any commands or jokes, [Alexa] Wakefield remembers her first reaction to Alexa being, “How are they [Amazon] sort of allowed to use somebody’s name, like a more common name, as something like a robotic command,” she says, “It seems like a little bit of a violation.”

Later, she adds, “It’s placing your name in a subservient manner.”

These days, Wakefield says she’s learned to “look on the bright side.” “It’s sort of a feeling of pride,” she says, “Like a person named Alexa is very helpful!”

From a Cup of Jo post about offbeat middle names:

My friend gave her baby the middle name “Swift” because her labor was so quick.

Our friends chose the middle name “Buffalo” for their son because it was his dad’s nickname growing up. “It took my husband nine months to convince me,” my friend told me. “Then, in the middle of the night after signing the birth certificate, I had a mild panic attack at the hospital. Now I love it.”

From a Science of Us post about why it’s so hard to remember someone’s name:

There is a very simple reason why it’s so easy for the names of new acquaintances to slip right out of your head within moments of being introduced: Names are kind of meaningless. Memory experts say that the more pathways back to a memory you have, the easier it becomes to retrieve that memory, and this just doesn’t often happen naturally with names.

[…]

Sure, there may be family history or a great deal of sentimental meaning behind a person’s first name, but when you meet someone at a party, there’s no readily apparent reason why this guy should be named Mike and that guy should be named Max.

From an interview with CUNY business school student Janeflora Henriques:

When I was born, my oldest sister (who was a difficult child) insisted I be named “Florence” after a movie actress she idolized. My sister threatened consequences if I weren’t. On the other hand, the tradition of my tribe dictated that I be named after my dad’s eldest sister. Fearing whiplash from in-laws, my mother was wary to skip naming me after my aunt. At the same time, my mother was concerned about a daughter who said she would have nothing to do with me if I weren’t named Florence. So my mother shortened my aunt Jennifer’s name to “Jane” and Florence to “Flora” and gave me both.

From a Guardian article about extinct Hyoliths and their “helens”:

We all tend associate certain qualities to people’s names, usually on the basis of people we have known. Helen, for example, is a very sensible name. I associate it with practical, dependable people I have known. You can rely on a Helen. A quick look at the ONS data for girls’ names in England and Wales tells me that it reached a high point of number 8 in the list of baby names in both 1964 and 1974. It’s also the technical term for a hyolith appendage: a hyolithid has a pair of helens. I think this is utterly brilliant. The original paper from 1975 says “We term these … structures helens because the word has no functional connotations, and they were first described under the generic name Helenia by Walcott”. Really? Or did they know a Helen?

Want to see more quotes about names? Check out the name quotes category.