How popular is the baby name David in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to David and check out all the blog posts that mention the name David.

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Popularity of the Baby Name David

Number of Babies Named David

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name David

Popular Baby Names in New York City, 2017

According to New York City’s Department of Health, the most popular baby names in the city in 2017 were Emma and Liam.

Here are New York City’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Emma
2. Olivia
3. Mia
4. Sophia
5. Isabella
6. Ava
7. Leah
8. Emily
9. Sarah
10. Abigail

Boy Names
1. Liam
2. Noah
3. Jacob
4. Ethan
5. David
6. Lucas
7. Matthew
8. Jayden
9. Aiden
10. Daniel

In the girls’ top ten, Abigail replaces Madison.

In the boys’ top ten, David and Jayden replace Dylan and Michael.

Within each of the five boroughs, the top baby names were…

  • Manhattan: Olivia and James
  • Bronx: Isabella and Liam
  • Brooklyn: Esther and David
  • Queens: Emma and Liam
  • Staten Island: Olivia and Michael

And finally, some of the baby names bestowed just 10 times each in NYC last year:

  • Artemis, Tzippy, Reizy (girl names)
  • Azriel, Zeus, Thaddeus (boy names)

NYC also used to break down top names by ethnic/racial group (see the 2015 rankings, for example) but this time around the press release didn’t include that information.

Source: Health Department Announces Emma and Liam Are Most Popular Baby Names For 2017

The Height of Alfie in America

alfie, movie, baby name, 1960s

These days, the baby name Alfie sees a lot more usage overseas than it does in America. That said, Alfie (and Alfy) were doing some interesting things on the U.S. baby name charts in the mid-1960s:

Year Alfie usage Alfy usage
1969 34 baby boys unlisted
1968 57 baby boys [ranked 968th] unlisted
1967 62 baby boys [ranked 915th] unlisted
1966 16 baby boys 15 baby boys [debut]
1965 unlisted unlisted
1964 unlisted unlisted

(There was some female usage of Alfie during this time as well, but I didn’t include it in the table.)

Alfie‘s influence is easy enough to pinpoint, so let’s start there. In 1966, the well-received British movie Alfie came out — in March in the UK, and in August in the US. Michael Caine had the starring role as womanizer Alfie, and this proved to be the breakthrough role of his career.

The film — with lots of help from the theme song “Alfie,” which was recorded and released by multiple artists, including Dionne Warwick — pushed the baby name Alfie into the top U.S. 1,000, where it stuck around for just two years.

The explanation behind the sudden appearance of Alfy, a distinct spelling (and also the top one-hit wonder name for boys in 1966), took me a lot longer to figure out.

alfy, baby name, 1966, tv
Alfy

This one came from the short-lived teen soap opera Never Too Young, which aired on September of 1965 to June of 1966. It was set in Malibu and was narrated by the character Alfy, owner of the local beach hangout. He was played by British actor David Watson (whose first American TV appearance was on Rawhide with Clint Eastwood, aka Rowdy Yates).

One thing I find curious is that two fictional British characters named Alfie/Alfy emerged around the same time in American pop culture. The movie was an adaptation of the 1963 play Alfie by Bill Naughton…perhaps the play influenced the writers of the TV show as well?

Which spelling do you like more, Alfie or Alfy?

Source: Never Too Young – Wikipedia

Popular Baby Names in Austria, 2017

According to Statistics Austria, the most popular baby names in the country in 2017 were Anna and Maximilian.

Here are Austria’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Anna, 949 baby girls
2. Emma, 825
3. Marie, 674
4. Lena, 665
5. Laura, 656
6. Sophia, 649
7. Emilia, 618
8. Mia, 574
9. Sophie, 560
10. Johanna, 553

Boy Names
1. Maximilian, 908 baby boys
2. Paul, 814
3. David, 798
4. Elias, 783 (tie)
4. Jakob, 783 (tie)
6. Lukas, 760
7. Felix, 747
8. Alexander, 742
9. Tobias, 741
10. Jonas, 726

In 2016, Austria’s top two names were Anna and David.

Austria also puts out a set of rankings that combines names with the same etymological roots. On that list, the top name groups were:

  • “Anna” (Ana, Ann, Anna, Anne, Annè, Chana, Channa, Haina, Hana, Hanah, Hanna, Hannah, Hanne, Hena, Iana, Jaana, Jana, Janah, Jannah, Yahna, Yana), and
  • “Lukas” (Luc, Luca, Lucas, Lúcás, Lucca, Luka, Lukas, Lukás, Lukáš, Lukasz, Łukasz, Luke).

Source: Anna und Maximilian waren 2017 die beliebtesten Babynamen

Name Spotting: Malancthon

sign, colorado, names
Sign inside Garden of the Gods

My dad came out to visit us in Colorado recently. He loves geology, so we made sure to take him to several different places with impressive rocks/terrain.

One place we visited was Garden of the Gods in Colorado Springs. In this park we spotted the above sign, which described how the park got its name back in the 1850s:

As they looked over this area of cathedral-like rock spires, one man, Malancthon Beach, commented that the spot would be a great place for a beer garden someday. His friend, a poetic young man named Rufous Cable, replied that it was a place “fit for the Gods.”

It’s a cool story, but, to me, that first name “Malancthon” is way more interesting than the origin of the park name. Where did it come from?

My best guess is that Malancthon is a tribute to 16th-century German theologian Philipp Melanchthon, one of the leaders of the Protestant Reformation. His surname at birth was Schwartzerd (“black earth” in German), but as a young man he Latinized his name to the classical equivalent Melanchthon (“black earth” in Greek).

Civilian Conservation Corps, new deal
CCC Company 1848

We also saw some names at Red Rocks, which is both a park and a famous amphitheater.

The amphitheater was constructed from 1936 to 1941 by men in the Civilian Conservation Corps, a work relief program that existed during the Great Depression. One display included a photo of 124 of the men in the local CCC. Here are their first names, sorted by frequency:

  • 5: Joe, Raymond
  • 4: Charles
  • 3: Arthur, Clarence, Edward
  • 2: Bill, Byron, Carl, David, Earnest, Edwin, Everett, Jack, James, Leo, Maurice, William
  • 1: Aaron, Albert, Aldine, Alfonso, Allen, Alva, Amos, Ancelmo, Arleigh, Aubrey, Audrey, Barnett, Blaine, Calvin, Celestino, Charley, Claud, Claude, Clayton, Cleston, Dale, Damas, Dan, Darold, Dick, Don, Donald, Ed, Elden, Elias, Elipio, Emerson, Emilio, Eric, Ernest, Eston, Fares, Frank, Fred, Glenn, Grant, Gust, Guy, Horace, Hubert, Irvin, Jake, Jasper, Jesse, Jim, John, Jose, Kenneth, Lawrence, Leland, Leonard, Lester, Louis, Lyman, Manual, Marvin, Max, Merce, Noah, Norman, Orval, Pasqual, Paul, Pete, Richard, Rowland, Rudolfo, Russel, Russell, Sandeford, Trenton, Willard

…What interesting names have you spotted while out and about recently?

Classics on the Decline: Paul, Jesse, Frank

boy names falling out of fashion

A few weeks back, a reader named Caitlin emailed me a cool list of well-known names that were decreasing in usage. Her list included:

  • Andrew, now ranked 40th — lowest ranking since 1963
  • Michael, now ranked 12th — lowest ranking since 1942
  • David, now ranked 23rd — lowest ranking since 1924

She also generously told me that I could share her findings (thank you Caitlin!).

The names that intrigued me most were the “lowest ever” names: names that had been in the data since 1880, but that saw their lowest usage ever (in terms of rankings) in 2017. Three of the boy names on her list — Paul, Richard, Robert — were “lowest ever” names, so I decided start with these and search for others.

I checked hundreds of potential candidates. Many (like Andrew, Michael, and David) hit a low in 2017, but it wasn’t their all-time low. Many others (like Stanley, Alvin, and Clarence) hit a low recently, but not as recently as 2017.

In the end, I was able to add 15 names to the list:

  • Allen. Ranked 401st in 2017; peak was 71st in the 1940s/1950s.
  • Dennis. Ranked 544th in 2017; peak was 16th in the 1940s.
  • Edgar. Ranked 353rd in 2017; peak was 51st in the 1880s.
  • Edwin. Ranked 332nd in 2017; peak was 52nd in the 1910s/1920s.
  • Frank. Ranked 373rd in 2017; peak was 6th in the 1880s/1890s.
  • Gerald. Ranked 824th in 2017; peak was 19th in the 1930s.
  • Glenn. Ranked 1,288th in 2017; peak was 55th in the 1960s.
  • Herman. Ranked 2,347th in 2017; peak was 44th in the 1880s/1890s.
  • Jerome. Ranked 857th in 2017; peak was 93rd in the 1930s.
  • Jesse. Ranked 186th in 2017; peak was 37th in the 1980s.
  • Lloyd. Ranked 1,570th in 2017; peak was 51st in the 1910s.
  • Martin. Ranked 281st in 2017; peak was 62nd in the 1960s.
  • Marvin. Ranked 559th in 2017; peak was 44th in the 1930s.
  • Paul. Ranked 225th in 2017; peak was 12th in the 1910s/1930s.
  • Raymond. Ranked 293rd in 2017; peak was 14th in the 1910s.
  • Richard. Ranked 175th in 2017; peak was 5th in the 1930s/1940s.
  • Robert. Ranked 65th in 2017; peak was 1st in the 1920s/1930s/1950s.
  • Wayne. Ranked 816th in 2017; peak was 29th in the 1940s.

Interestingly, all 18 have spent time in the top 100. And one, Robert, is still in the top 100. (How long before Robert is out of the top 100, do you think?)

A handful of girl names also saw their lowest-ever rankings in 2017. I’ll post that list next week…