How popular is the baby name Delia in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Delia and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Delia.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Delia

Number of Babies Named Delia

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Delia

Name Quotes for the Weekend #39

Quote from Uzo Aduba's mother on the name Uzoamaka

From “The Eyes Have It,” an interview with Orange Is the New Black actress Uzoamaka “Uzo” Aduba, who was asked whether she ever considered changing her name:

When I started as an actor? No, and I’ll tell you why. I had already gone through that. My family is from Nigeria, and my full name is Uzoamaka, which means “The road is good.” Quick lesson: My tribe is Igbo, and you name your kid something that tells your history and hopefully predicts your future. So anyway, in grade school, because my last name started with an A, I was the first in roll call, and nobody ever knew how to pronounce it. So I went home and asked my mother if I could be called Zoe. I remember she was cooking, and in her Nigerian accent she said, “Why?” I said, “Nobody can pronounce it.” Without missing a beat, she said, “If they can learn to say Tchaikovsky and Michelangelo and Dostoyevsky, they can learn to say Uzoamaka.”

(There’s a Tchaikovsky in Brazil.)

From an article about a woman named Cinderella in the Irish Independent:

“I’d been living as Eva my whole life until I found out my name was Evangeline Cinderella. Of course this was the most amazing news as a seven year old girl and unfortunately I told everybody. I’ve paid for it ever since. People have always remembered,” she said.

From the essay “The name shame of Axl, Anakin, Arya…” by Gene Weingarten (via Name News):

To consult this list [the SSA’s Change in Popularity list] is to dip your toe into the fetid waters of cheesy celebrity worship. Consider this: One of the skyrocketing names is … “Anakin.” Yes, people are giving their baby boys a name invented specifically to sound non-human, for a character in another galaxy far, far away, one who grows up to become Darth Vader, an evil overlord who wants to enslave the universe. (There have been plenty of Darths, too.)

(Here’s more on Darth.)

From the video “Instrument: Celeste” featuring keyboardist Elizabeth Burley of the Philharmonia Orchestra of London:

I’ve got a celeste here today to show you how that works. As you’ll see it looks a little bit like an upright piano, but it’s actually a lot different. Although it’s operated by a keyboard, inside, instead of strings, it’s a set of…metal chime bars. They’re suspended over wooden resonating boxes, and when I press a key, a hammer hits the chime bar to make the sound, like on a piano the hammer would hit the string. The name celeste…it’s a French name meaning “heavenly,” and it does make a very heavenly sound, as you’ll hear.

From a blog post about electronic music pioneer Delia Derbyshire at Open Culture:

With her buttoned-up style, work with the UN, and name like a plucky character in a certain English wizard series, Delia Derbyshire may not seem a likely pioneer of experimental electronic music.

From the blog post “What’s in a Name?” by theology professor/social activist Rev. Dr. Miguel A. De La Torre:

Today, no one calls me Brother Mike. Nonetheless, if the first act of liberation is self naming, why do I still insist on spelling my surname the way those who had power over me taught me? I have no doubt the reader is probably wondering what’s the big deal? Just spell my name correctly. What they fail to recognize is the power of the colonizing process, and the difficulty to reclaim identity. So as I tag my name to my liberationist works I am reminded with each upper case letter how far I still need to go to claim my own liberation. The struggle, la lucha, continues, even in the letters of my name.

From the article “What Your Conference Room Names Say About Your Company Culture” by Ekaterina Walter:

At Sprinklr, our conference rooms are named after the company’s values. Honesty, Passion, Perseverance, Humility, Character, Courage, and Integrity are just some of the names you will encounter. My personal favorites are Awesomeness and 1+1=3. When I asked our founder, Ragy Thomas, why the leadership team chose to name conference rooms in this way, he said: “It would be kind of hard to be arrogant in a room named Humility, wouldn’t it? Or give up in a room named Perseverance, don’t you think?”

From the New York Times article “Jens and Vita, but Molli? Danes Favor Common Names” (2004) about Denmark’s Law on Personal Names, which was “initially designed to bring order to surnames”:

Then in the 1960’s, a furor erupted over the first name Tessa, which resembled tisse, which means to urinate in Danish. Distressed over the lack of direction in the law, the Danish government expanded the statute to grapple with first names. Now the law is as long as an average-size book.

Among the baby names rejected in Denmark: Anus, Pluto, and Monkey. Among those accepted: Leica, Benji, Jiminico, and Fee.

Want more quotes? Here’s the name quotes category.


Popular Baby Names in Providence, RI, 1866

providenceLast month we looked at the top Providence names of 1867, so today let’s check out the rankings from the year before — 1866.

First, some stats:

  • 1,633 babies were babies were born in Providence in 1866, by my count. (The number given by the author of the document is 1,632.)
  • 1,457 of these babies (707 girls and 750 boys) had names that were registered with the government at the time of publication. The other 176 babies got blank spaces.
  • 234 unique names (123 girl names and 108 boy names) were shared among these 1,457 babies.

And here’s some extra information I forgot to mention in the last post: In 1860, the city of Providence was home to 29.0% of Rhode Island’s population. In 1870, it was home to 31.7% of the population. So each of these 3 sets of rankings (1866, 1867, 1868) ought to account for roughly 30% of the residents of the state.

Now, on to the names…

Top 5

The top 5 girl names and boy names of 1866 were, unsurprisingly, very similar to the top names of 1867.

Top Baby Girl Names Top Baby Boy Names
1. Mary
2. Catherine
3. Ellen
4. Margaret
5. Sarah
1. John
2. William
3. James
4. George
5. Thomas

The girls’ top 5 is identical, while the boys’ top 5 includes Thomas instead of George.

Girl Names

As expected, Mary was the front-runner by a huge margin. And, while there were dozens of Catherines, and a single Catharine, there weren’t any Katherines.

  1. Mary, 149 baby girls
  2. Catherine, 43
  3. Ellen, 40
  4. Margaret, 37
  5. Sarah, 36
  6. Elizabeth, 32
  7. Alice, 18
  8. Annie, 15
  9. Anna & Eliza, 14 each (2-way tie)
  10. Clara, 13
  11. Ann, 11
  12. Carrie, Emma, Jane & Susan, 10 each (4-way tie)
  13. Grace & Ida, 9 each (2-way tie)
  14. Esther, Martha & Minnie, 7 each (3-way tie)
  15. Anne & Julia, 6 each (2-way tie)
  16. Agnes, Charlotte, Cora, Harriet, Jennie, Joanna, Maria & Rosanna, 5 each (8-way tie)
  17. Amelia, Bridget, Ella, Frances, Hattie, Lydia, Nellie & Theresa, 4 each (8-way tie)
  18. Abby, Emily, Florence, Josephine, Laura, Lillian, Lizzie, Louise & Marion, 3 each (9-way tie)
  19. Ada, Amy, Augusta, Deborah, Edith, Etta, Eva, Fannie, Georgianna, Hannah, Henrietta, Honora, Isabel, Isabella, Lottie, Lucy, Mabel, Marietta, Maud & Teresa, 2 each (20-way tie)
  20. Almira, Annette, Bertha, Catharine, Cedelia, Celia, Christina, Delia, Diana, Dora, Dorcas, Eldora, Eleanor, Elsie, Emeline, Etherine, Eugenie, Evangeline, Fanny, Flora, Geneva, Georgia, Gracie, Helen, Helena, Imogene, Janette, Jessie, Kate, Lena, Louisa, Lucia, Lucinda, Madelina, Marian, Marsalin, May, Millie, Mina, Mini, Minna, Neatah, Nettie, Phebe, Rebecca, Rosa, Roselia, Rosetta, Ruth, Sophia, Stella, Susanna, Susannah, Tillie & Winnifred, 1 each (55-way tie)

Boy Names

John had an even more commanding lead in 1866 than in 1867.

  1. John, 109 baby boys
  2. William, 78
  3. James, 62
  4. George, 44
  5. Thomas, 41
  6. Charles, 36
  7. Edward, 28
  8. Joseph, 27
  9. Frederick, 20
  10. Henry, 18
  11. Frank, 17
  12. Michael, 15
  13. Francis, 14
  14. Daniel, 13
  15. Albert, Patrick & Robert, 12 each (3-way tie)
  16. Walter, 11
  17. Arthur, Peter & Samuel, 8 each (3-way tie)
  18. Alfred, Harry, Louis & Stephen, 7 each (4-way tie)
  19. Martin, 6
  20. Matthew, 5
  21. Christopher, Clarence, Herbert, Howard & Hugh, 4 each (5-way tie)
  22. Benjamin, Eugene, Ira & Jeremiah, 3 each (4-way tie)
  23. Aaron, Alvin, Arnold, Earl, Edgar, Elisha, Freddie, Harrison, Lewis, Marcus, Nicholas, Philip, Richard & Timothy, 2 each (14-way tie)
  24. Abner, Adam, Adolph, Alanson, Alden, Ambrose, Antonio, August, Augustavus*, Augustus, Bartholomew, Bernard, Bradford, Byron, Chauncey, Clinton, David, Duncan, Eben, Ebenezer, Edwin, Elias, Elliott, Ethan, Everett, Ezra, Ferdinand, Frederic, Fullerton, Gilbert, Gwynn, Harold, Herman, Isaac, Jesse, Josiah, Lauriston, Luther, Manuel, Marks, Maurice, Miles, Mortimer, Oliver, Olney, Oscar, Otto, Rana, Rectol, Salisbury, Shamball, Simon, Terence, Theodore, Victor, Willard, Willie & Wilton, 1 each (58-way tie)

(I didn’t combine any variant spellings, but I did lump the abbreviated names Chas., Benj., and Fred’k in with Charles, Benjamin and Frederick.)

*Does Augustavus = Augustus + Gustav, I wonder?

Twins

I counted 19 pairs of twins born in Providence in 1866. I didn’t notice any triplets this year. (All of these names have already been accounted for above.)

Twins (b/b) Twins (b/g) Twins (g/g)
Edgar & Oscar
Edward & James
Francis & James
James & John
John & Thomas
(blank) & (blank)
Frederick & Alice
John & Alice
Samuel & Sarah
Stephen & Annie
(blank) & Catherine
Agnes & Anna
Eldora & Ellen
Eliza & Mary
Elizabeth & Julia
Frances & Mary
Josephine & Mary
Mary & Sarah
Theresa & (blank)

I’ll try to finish/post the final set of rankings before the end of the year.

Source: Snow, Edwin M. Alphabetical Lists of Persons Deceased, Born and Married in the City of Providence During the Year 1866. Providence: Hammond, Angell & Co., 1867.

Name Quotes for the Weekend #25

elton john quote about the name reginald

From an interview with Elton John on Larry King Live:

Well, I was making a record, and I had to choose a name, because they said, you know, you can’t make a record under the name of Reg Dwight, because it’s never going to — you know, it’s not attractive enough. And I agreed with that, and I couldn’t wait to change my name anyway, because I’m not too fond of the name of Reginald. It’s a very kind of ’50s English name.

So I picked Elton because there wasn’t — nobody seemed to have the name Elton. And I picked John to go with it. And it was — it was done on a bus going from London Heathrow back into the city. And it was done very quickly. So I said, oh, Elton John. That’s fine.

From The Life of William Shakespeare: A Critical Biography by Lois Potte:

Though contemporary sonneteers populated their world with lovers called Astrophil, Parthenophil, Stella, Delia, and Idea, the only names that appear in Shakespeare’s sonnets are Adonis, Helen, Mars, Saturn, Philomel, Eve, Cupid, Diana, and Time — and the one non-mythological figure, the author, “Will.”

From An Apology to Every (White) Girl Named Becky by Dara T. Mathis:

Black people commonly use the term “Becky” when referring to generic white women. It has a slight negative connotation (airheadedness), but white women don’t have to do anything to deserve the title.

Clearly, this is as problematic as sexual stereotypes against any demographic of people. Women fight on a daily basis not to be objectified, but this portrayal takes it further and assigns white women a role to which they may not ascribe.

Despite my dislike for using a proper name as a slur, it took an actual person to bring it home to me. After my tweet, a white colleague nicknamed Becky told me about how she’s been forced to use Rebecca instead. A group of black men were catcalling her down a sidewalk and she was doing her best to ignore them. One of them yelled out, “Hey Becky!” That’s her name: she automatically swung her head around. But this had the opposite effect of validating the men’s impression that she was a Becky, not a woman named Becky. They laughed. She laughed, too, because…it is kinda funny.

But I stopped laughing quickly. I had never thought about the implications of people using your name as a stereotype against you. Where can you run to escape that?

From a post about unusual personal names at Futility Closet:

A memo to every parent who’s ever lived: Giving your kid a special name does not make him special. It never has. It never will.

You know what I mean. It’s one thing to give yourself a screwy moniker. Body-modification enthusiasts have changed their names to Swirly Wanx Sinatra, Grenade Bee of Death, and RooRaaah Mew Crumbs, among other things, and there’s a U.S. Army Ohio National Guard firefighter who named himself Optimus Prime. That’s fine, you’re the one who has to live with it.

It’s worse when you inflict a harebrained epithet on a newborn, who will have to drag it through life like a neon hairshirt.

From a post about Ameribella cheese at Cheese Notes:

Originally named Arabella, this cheese underwent a slight name change recently; as Leslie told me, it’s always been named after Matthew’s great grandmother, whose name was America Arabella. To honor her, they combined her two names and came up with the Ameribella, which also has the unique quality of honoring this cheese’s American terroir and Italian origins.

(I discovered Ameribella via the Baby Name Pondering post Cheesy Baby Names.)

From an article by Kerry Parnell in The Daily Telegraph:

[W]hen I was born and my parents proudly announced my name to the family, my great-grandma was disgusted and informed them Kerry was a dog’s name.

She never wavered from this conviction until one day, when I was about five, we visited her to see her new poodle puppy.

“What’s his name?” I asked. “Kerry,” she replied, stony faced. There was a long, awkward silence and no one ever mentioned it again.

Ironically, great-grandma went by the name of “Pete”, which, unless I am very much mistaken, is a man’s name.

One day, I vow, I will get a dog just so I can call it Pete, for revenge.

Have you read anything interesting about names lately? Please send me the link so I can add it to a future quote post! Email me, Tweet me, or just leave a comment below.

Baby Name Battle – Delia vs. Trixie

Trixie Friganza was “one of the great singing comediennes of the first decade of the 20th century.” She acted and sang in theater, vaudeville, and movies.

Trixie Friganza
Trixie Friganza

Her stage name was a combination of the nickname Trixie (which evolved from the earlier nickname Topsy, which was inspired by the Uncle Tom’s Cabin character) and her mother’s maiden name, Friganza.

But I think her original name, Delia O’Callahan, was also quite catchy. (Though I may be partial, as my maiden name was Callahan.)

Which first name do you prefer, Delia or Trixie?

I prefer...

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And which first & last combination do you like better?

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Sources:

Image: Trixie Friganza by C. M. Hayes © David S. Shields/ALS

List of Female Names from 1888

female names, 1888

A while ago I found a book called “A Collection of Original Acrostics on Ladies’ Christian Names” that was published in Toronto in 1888.

I won’t post any of the poems, which are all pretty cheesy, but author George J. Howson does include an intriguing selection of names. He notes that he wrote acrostics for “all the most popular feminine christian names of the day, and many more that, while not in common use, are known to exist in actual life.”

Here’s the list:

Abigail
Ada
Adelaide
Adelle
Adeline
Addie
Aggie
Agnes
Alberta
Alecia
Aletha
Alfretta
Alice
Allie
Alma
Almeda
Almira
Alta
Althea
Alvira
Alzina
Amanda
Amelia
Amy
Ann
Anna
Annabell
Annas
Annette
Angelia
Angeline
Annie
Athaliah
Athelia
Augusta
Aura
Avis
Barbara
Beatrice
Bell
Bella
Berdie
Bertha
Bertie
Bessie
Beulah
Blanche
Bridget
Calista
Carrie
Carlotta
Cassie
Catherine
Cecilia
Cela
Celia
Celicia
Celis
Charlotte
Chloe
Christie
Christine
Clara
Clarissa
Cleanthe
Clementina
Constance
Cora
Cordelia
Corinne
Cornelia
Cynthia
Cyrena
Debbie
Delia
Della
Diana
Diantha
Dinah
Dollie
Dora
Dorcas
Dorinda
Dorothy
Edith
Edna
Effie
Ella
Eleanor
Eleanora
Electa
Ellen
Elfie
Eliza
Elma
Elsie
Emma
Emmeline
Emily
Ena
Erma
Estelle
Esther
Ethel
Ethelind
Ettie
Eugenie
Eula
Eunice
Euphemia
Euretta
Eva
Evalina
Eveline
Evelyn
Fannie
Felicia
Flora
Florence
Floss
Frances
Frank
Gay
Georgie
Georgina
Geraldine
Gertie
Gracie
Hagar
Hannah
Harriet
Hattie
Helen
Helena
Henrietta
Hulda
Ida
Irene
Isabel
Isabella
Isadora
Jane
Janet
Janie
Jeannette
Jemima
Jennet
Jennie
Jessie
Jerusha
Joanna
Josephine
Josie
Julia
Kate
Kathleen
Katie
Keziah
Lany
Laura
Leah
Leila
Lena
Lera
Lettie
Levina
Levinia
Libbie
Lida
Lilian
Lillie
Lizzie
Lola
Lora
Lorretta
Lottie
Lou
Louisa
Louise
Lucinda
Lucretia
Lucy
Luella
Lula
Lulu
Lydia
Mabel
Madelaine
Maggie
Malvina
Mamie
Marcella
Margaret
Maria
Marilla
Marion
Mary
Marsena
Martha
Mattie
Maud
Maudie
May
Melinda
Mellissa
Mercy
Mertie
Mildred
Millie
Mina
Minerva
Minnie
Mintha
Miranda
Mollie
Muriel
Myra
Myrtle
Nancy
Naomi
Nellie
Nettie
Nina
Nora
Ollie
Olive
Olivia
Ormanda
Ophelia
Pauline
Pearl
Phoebe
Phyllis
Priscilla
Prudence
Rachel
Rebecca
Rhoda
Robena
Rosa
Rosabel
Rosalie
Rosalind
Rosamond
Rose
Ruby
Ruth
Sabina
Sadie
Sally
Samantha
Sarah
Selina
Sophia
Sophronia
Stella
Susanna
Susie
Sybil
Teresa
Theodocia
Theresa
Tillie
Una
Verna
Victoria
Vida
Viola
Violet
Wilhelmina
Winifred
Zuba

Have any favorites?

Hulda/Huldah is one I like. It’s one of those names that I always see on old New England gravestones but never come across in real life. Wonder when that one will become stylish again.

BTW, has anyone ever seen a good name acrostic? Like, one that’s actually well-written and/or thought-provoking? Because I don’t think I ever have.

Source: A Collection of Original Acrostics on Ladies’ Christian Names by George J. Howson

Girl Names Beyond the Top 1,000

[UPDATE: Check out the Popular Baby Names page to see lists of the top 2,000 since 2000!]

Have you seen any of the most popular baby girl names beyond the top 1,000 yet? If not, here they are–down to the names that were given to 100 babies each last year. The 1,000th most popular girl name was Dania, given to 249 babies, and after Dania comes…

  • 249: Yadira [tied with Dania]
  • 248: Charlize, Estella, Jacey, Sariyah, Sky, Sloan, Tia, Yuliana
  • 247: Tanya
  • 246: Amaris, Desirae, Frida, Kaila
  • 245: Braylee, Essence, Karley, Kianna
  • 244: none
  • 243: Abrielle, Annette, Valery
  • 242: Alaya, Rory, Samiyah, Sanai
  • 241: Delia
  • 240: Blake, Chasity, Izabelle, Lillyana, Nahla, Shaila
  • 239: Cambria, Jana, Kaylah
  • 238: Dalilah, Evalyn, Renata
  • 237: Coraline, Jessa, Kaley, Kensley
  • 236: Brittney, Miya, Roxanne
  • 235: Annabell, Ashtyn, Dorothy, Giavanna, Janice
  • 234: Aya, Calista, Cierra, Julieta, Rivka, Saanvi, Samira
  • 233: Monserrat
  • 232: Aliah, Jaslyn, Makaila
  • 231: Areli, Bentley, Gracyn
  • 230: Blakely, Brissa, Iyana, Iyanna, Karis, Laurel, Leticia, Maryjane, Noor
  • 229: Bryn, Celine, Emory, Kayley, Kendyl, Leigha, Mariela, Taya
  • 228: Annalee, Jersey, Magdalena, Raylee, Sofie, Taniya
  • 227: Kamari, Kyndal, Melinda, Tamara, Unique
  • 226: Amalia, Ashanti, Kailynn, Kristin
  • 225: Brookelynn, Gretchen, Jamiyah, Karleigh, Suri
  • 224: Ashly
  • 223: Kya, Vienna, Zaniya
  • 222: Blair, Hailie, Krista, Noa, Yasmine, Zahra
  • 221: Johana, Kamiyah
  • 220: Cayla, Dallas, Joelle, Malaysia, Zainab
  • 219: Lesley
  • 218: Christiana
  • 217: Audrianna, Bayleigh, Elissa, Susana, Winter
  • 216: Lyra, Promise
  • 215: Dayanara, Emmalynn, Lucero, Selina
  • 214: Ashleigh, Keely, Nova, Nyah
  • 213: Harlee, Taniyah
  • 212: Abbygail, Keeley, Shaniyah
  • 211: Abigayle, Analise, Elliot, Jaleah, Nalani, Sally, Shyann, Temperance
  • 210: Cristal, Kori
  • 209: Adison, Aurelia, Cassie, Lianna
  • 208: Annaliese, Gillian, Landry, Milana, Rhea, Vivien
  • 207: Caleigh, Darlene, Emani, Geraldine, Gina, Luisa, Marian, Rileigh, Tiara
  • 206: Antonia, Arlene, Kamille
  • 205: Anjali, Chelsey, Colette, Izzabella, Jordin, Juniper, Kaycee, Laniya, Maribel, Marleigh
  • 204: Aviana, Katia
  • 203: Addie, Ariyah, Channing, Emmaline, Jalynn, Jazzlyn, Scarlette
  • 202: Galilea, Joslynn, Marin, Mercy, Reece
  • 201: Abrianna, Colleen, Denisse, Samiya, Treasure
  • 200: Kamora, Naima, Rebeca
  • 199: Aanya, Kaidence, Kamilah, Maycee, Romina
  • 198: Izabel, Malak, Marlie, Nyasia, Sarina, Tinsley
  • 197: Amyah, Aubrianna, Joselin, Lidia
  • 196: Carli, Harmoni, Jackeline, Kaleah, Kayli, Makiyah, Nariah, Shea, Soraya
  • 195: Ailyn, Anneliese, Ellison, Fallon, Remi
  • 194: Kamya, Tayla, Tyler
  • 193: Aditi, Elayna, Jailyn, Mireya
  • 192: Ariyana, Berkley, Kenia, Liv, Milena, Nicolette, Soleil
  • 191: Arden, Lillyanna, Maura, Vivianna
  • 190: Aubri, Avianna, Kathy, Lizette, Sonya, Yvette
  • 189: Alanah, Carson, Elly, Peighton, Shayna
  • 188: Evangelina, Laci, Maren
  • 187: Elyssa, Jamiya, Keila, Makaylah, Yara
  • 186: Emme, Graciela, Gwyneth
  • 185: Bonnie, Ellery, Elliott, Keily, Kenadie, Lucinda, Silvia
  • 184: Ananya, Astrid, Kailani, Maiya, Sunny, Wren
  • 183: Anais, Deja, Everleigh, Shreya, Tatianna
  • 182: Blanca, Elina, Sheila
  • 181: Amayah, Honesty, Lanie, Maite
  • 180: Kalia, Katy, Saylor
  • 179: Ashton, Citlali, Karmen, Mika
  • 178: Cordelia, Destini, Hunter, Lacie, Selene, Stevie, Tinley
  • 177: Alli, Annelise, Caelyn, Carrie, Celina, Dani, Jasmyn, Jazmyne, Kaci, Paislee, Toni
  • 176: Destiney, Gisele, Mabel, Rita, Sandy, Yarely
  • 175: Brandy, Brookelyn, Caitlynn, Estefany, Jaclyn, Kora, Mackenna, Marely
  • 174: Amariah, Amia, Deasia, Jaedyn, Justine
  • 173: Adamaris, Emmie, Nichole, Preslee, Rilee, Shirley
  • 172: Calleigh, Jaycie, Lilyann, Maddie
  • 171: Anita, Antonella, Bridgette, Lillyan
  • 170: Kalyn, Kirra, Sahara
  • 169: Analy, Kamiya, Lacy, Litzy, Mariajose, Maylee, Zaira
  • 168: Alex, Avani, Eunice, Jenesis, Monique, Nya, Wynter
  • 167: Ariyanna, Dina, Margarita, Nikki, Roxana
  • 166: Asha, Kacey, Karolina, Raya
  • 165: Estefani, Haidyn, Harleigh, Hillary, Josselyn, Kalea, Melia, Priya, Star
  • 164: Azalea, Drew, Lillyann, Magnolia, Miyah, Natali
  • 163: Ayden, Ayva, Gwen
  • 162: Alora, Aniah, Elana, Rhianna, Xochitl
  • 161: Aubry, Colbie, Devin, Freya, Milani, Noelia, Pyper, Rhiannon
  • 160: Audra, Faye, Jael, Kaylani, Maxine, Mayte, Nelly, Roxanna
  • 159: Adrian, Alessia, Carsyn, Everly, Gwenyth, Noel, Samaria, Tina, Ziva
  • 158: Alize, Amerie, Carter, Stacey
  • 157: Brylie, Camdyn, Dayanna, Emerie, Leena, Louisa, Robin, Yaretzy
  • 156: Brandi, Breana, Dalila, Eryn, Samya, Tayler
  • 155: Estelle, Kahlan, Margot, Veda
  • 154: Abygail, Aida, Alexi, Belle, Betsy, Christian, Coral, Jacklyn, Kalli, Tatyana
  • 153: Aubriana, Hattie, Jacie, Jaya, Marcella, Mylah, Rocio
  • 152: Aubrielle, Beatriz, Delanie, Ila, Lilyan, Meagan, Robyn, Savana
  • 151: Darby, Ellianna, Janie, Malina, Penny
  • 150: Allyssa, Bryana, Isha, Priscila, Susanna, Zahara
  • 149: Anissa, Brynley, Carol, Constance, Ellis, Geneva, Gizelle, Halo, Jasleen, Joana, Sahana
  • 148: Amberly, Anniston, Cailey, Farah, Nadine, Nailah, Rosalyn, Scout, Sheyla
  • 147: Adelle, Arlette, Austyn, Berenice, Estefania, Evalynn, Kaniyah, Lluvia, Makenzi, Mariella, Ryley, Shaelyn
  • 146: Elia, Josslyn, Louise, Mayah, Nariyah, Zoya
  • 145: Alianna, Capri, Ginger, Jaslynn, Katerina, Khloee, Kinlee, Linnea
  • 144: Anaiah, Ericka, Hadleigh, Juana, Keziah, Raniyah, Vida
  • 143: Arleth, Brea, Fabiola, Flor, Jaeda, Katlyn, Lela, Lucie, Maylin
  • 142: Darcy, Dasia, Jalyn, Rilynn, Sylvie, Taelyn
  • 141: Aniston, Chyna, Emmaleigh, Janaya, Trista, Zaylee
  • 140: Chiara, Emmeline, Thea
  • 139: Alyse, Candice, Carmella, Cayleigh, Kyrie, Yaneli, Yulissa
  • 138: Alasia, Darla, Diane, Leilany, Lilli, Paulette
  • 137: Amora, Cielo, Jurnee, Kacie, Makiya, Marlen, Reilly
  • 136: Alexandrea, Alyssia, Anayah, Andi, Holland, Keren, Sahasra, Yahaira
  • 135: Aja, Issabella, Kelis, Malayah
  • 134: Adaline, Addelyn, Anali, Ayah, Ema, Emalee, Layna, Leanne, Londynn, Triniti
  • 133: Adilene, Adilyn, Avril, Cailin, Calla, Charlene, Elisha, Jazlene, Melani, Yessenia
  • 132: Analeigh, Candace, Clementine, Kloey, Yolanda
  • 131: Alexys, Anisa, Ari, Della, Leela, Milania
  • 130: Aven, Cloe, Danae, Dianna, Grayson, Keegan
  • 129: Annmarie, Betty, Brianne, Calli, Kenleigh, Malka, Skylah, Taleah, Trisha
  • 128: Annaleigh, Avalyn, Baileigh, Brynna, Grecia, Harlie, Harmonie, Jaela, Katarina, Makaela, Maliya, Melisa
  • 127: Adela, Jackelyn, Janya, Jazelle, Jianna, Kennadi, Marjorie
  • 126: Andie, Felicia, Jorja, Kaily, Katharine, Mallorie, Mari, Milla, Ramona, Vianney, Yvonne
  • 125: Daniyah, Jayna, Kalani, Katalina, Kelsi, Kiya, Kristine, Rayleigh, Remy, Shira, Starr, Tracy
  • 124: Christy, Hadlee, Jovie, Naya, Shakira
  • 123: Adalee, Addilynn, Beatrix, Kami, Kenadee, Maisie, Rania, Solange, Yuna
  • 122: Alysa, Aminah, Claira, Elora, Emmerson, Isadora, Jaci, Jiselle, Kinslee, Marcela, Rosie
  • 121: Anisha, Avalon, Cayden, Citlaly, Eleni, Jenifer, Kasandra, Madisen, Makinley, Nala, Roxy, Samaya
  • 120: Camden, Ivette, Jeanette, Judy, Montserrat, Quincy, Taylar, Whitley
  • 119: Adrianne, Angely, Arianny, Baylie, Daria, Ester, Jahzara, Kenzi, Makyla, Remington, Tallulah
  • 118: Addalyn, Ebony, Emerald, Jaquelin, Leann, Martina, Maryann, Nikita, Poppy, Vanesa
  • 117: Aime, Audree, Ela, Emalyn, Heavenly, Malena, Melodie, Nellie, Oakley, Rachelle, Stormy, Viola
  • 116: Alonna, Brooklynne, Dior, Jaila, Lupita, Rosario, Taylin, Vianey, Yuridia
  • 115: Adamari, Audrie, Chandler, Jamiah, Kalina, Kaniya, Kayle, Randi, Xitlali
  • 114: Alba, Allegra, Ariela, Charis, Collins, Ivory, Joseline, Kamdyn, Kaylan, Lourdes, Norma, Saniah
  • 113: Alliyah, Alysha, Briza, Flora, Kari, Kensington, Maryn, Sade, Taytum, Yasmeen
  • 112: Anaiya, Brook, Ciera, Davina, Elli, Katheryn, Khadija, Madysen, Mindy, Roslyn, Semaj, Yael
  • 111: Adina, Amaria, Ania, Anushka, August, Carys, Frankie, Gitty, Jalaya, Janay, Kenlee, Nayla, Neha, Ria, Shoshana, Siri, Taylee
  • 110: Alea, Ariya, Cambree, Devon, Juanita, Khloie, Lisette, Lori, Lynn, Persephone, Prisha, Teegan
  • 109: Aila, Braylin, Breonna, Cianna, Emi, Jalissa, Jessalyn, Johannah, Jolee, Magdalene, Mariel, Shay, Skylee, Zoee
  • 108: Annamarie, Gracey, Haily, Iman, Julisa, Kaileigh, Laken, Lamya, Loren, Raylynn, Rhyan, Sanjana, Sonja, Yoselyn
  • 107: Addysen, Analee, Avalynn, Aymar, Giulianna, Haiden, Henley, Kaliah, Kamaria, Lyndsey, Mylie, Seraphina, Tanisha
  • 106: Aiden, Annalisa, Arionna, Blessing, Carrington, Dafne, Jesse, Kaydance, Lynette, May, Rhylee, Rylynn, Samia, Sol, Veronika
  • 105: Adilynn, Britany, Cameryn, Chevelle, Ciana, Jackie, Josalyn, Mariya, Raleigh, Skylynn, Sydnie, Tristyn, Zaina
  • 104: Aleksandra, Alycia, Anijah, Elysia, Jennah, Kristy, Lexus, Lexy, Liyah, Sabina, Tyra, Vicky
  • 103: Akshara, Alysia, Anaiyah, Araya, Brinlee, Dasha, Elinor, Giulia, Gladys, Jena, Joanne, Katelin, Kinleigh, Mandy, Myka, Preslie, Rylin, Sydni, Taliah, Violette, Ysabella, Zayla
  • 102: Ariadna, Azucena, Divya, Jacquelin, Joey, Karely, Khloey, Makiah, Miabella, Neriah, Olyvia, Ruthie, Saphira, Tanvi, Zaida
  • 101: Candy, Daira, Isobel, Jailynn, Janette, Janyla, Jessenia, Jiya, Kalista, Luella, Meera, Navaeh, Niya, Rain, Sana, Valencia, Zooey
  • 100: Aleyah, Alysson, Ayesha, Corina, Egypt, Imogen, Italia, Karmyn, Sariya, Zariya

P.S. Here’s the 2009 version. And here’s the boys’ list for 2010.

Baby Name Needed for the Sister of Brynnlee

A reader named Raychel has a daughter named Brynnlee Rose. She’s expecting her second daughter in early December, and would like some help choosing a name. Here’s what she says:

My husband’s name begins with Bry, mine with Ray so we’d like it to contain one of those or a combo Bray. No lee, li, lie, ley, leigh endings. If possible we’d like to also honor my Nani, whose name is Delores (Dee), but that could be moved to MN position.

So far we’ve considered Auraylia, Brayslin, Bryar, Bryonie, Rayenne, Abryelle, Bryenne/Brayenne, Esmeray, Deloray, Araya/h (though I have cousin named Raya & I’m afraid that might be too close!) Rayanna and Rayannon (Rhiannon) are also out because of family! And I can’t stand the other typical Ray names, Rayna, Rayleen, Raynelle, etc.

And MN of Nanalie, Derora, Deeana, Delora, Esdee, Delwen, Nanice, Deegen, Delaine (My MN is Elaine) to honor my Nana OR Briar, Evangeline, Scarlett, Rinslett, Liliana.

Lots to think about here! Let’s do first names first, middle names second.

I’m partial to first names that are familiar and easy to spell, so many of the above aren’t really up my alley. I understand why they include bry and ray, and I do love it when a baby name has a family connection, but I’m also wary about unusual names and/or names that are unnecessarily complicated. Names like these can turn into a headache for the child. I mean, none of the above are as difficult as Addtakizz, but someone named Abryelle or Brayslin or Rayannon will still have to spell her name out for people on a regular basis. And if that can be avoided, well…why not avoid it?

Here are some other first name possibilities:

Sabryna
Sabrina, but with a y instead of an i.

Grayce
Grace with an extra letter.

Aubrey
Aubrey’s -brey isn’t bray, but it’s similar.

Marybeth
Does not have bry or ray, but does include all of those letters (a, b, r, y).

Avery, Crystal
Both contain the letters of ray (a, r, y).

Robyn, Ruby
Both contain the letters of bry (b, r, y).

Middle names aren’t used as often as first names, so I think people can get away with a lot more when it comes to middles. I really like Delaine (two family names for the price of one!). Delora is also cute. I’m not too keen on the Nana-based names Nanalie and Nanice, though. Especially when you consider that the Nana in question isn’t the child’s Nana.

Here are a few other middle name ideas, all of which contain the del of Delores:

Adelaide
Adele
Adeline
Cordelia
Delia
Della

I wonder–was “Dee” by itself ever considered for the middle spot? It would be a direct connection to Raychel’s Nana, and also reminiscent of Brynnlee’s middle name (in the sense that both are monosyllabic).

Which of the above names do you like best for the sister of Brynnlee Rose? What other name suggestions would you offer to Raychel?