How popular is the baby name Dulcibella in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Dulcibella and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Dulcibella.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.

Popularity of the Baby Name Dulcibella

Number of Babies Named Dulcibella

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Dulcibella

Feithfailge, Jossoway, Ulundi – Random List of Names

I recently read through a 19th-century book about personal names “either in every-day use or lingering in the literature of Great Britain and Ireland.” Here are a couple dozen names that caught my eye:

“A female name of common occurrence in the Highlands of Scotland. Formed from Aeneas,” which itself was “not from the classical name, but from the Gaelic name Aonghas, i.e. Angus.”

“The Gaelic original of Banquo. Some translate this name ‘white’ (Gaelic ban, white, also pale, fair, fair-haired); but it is rather from ban-cu, the white dog; figuratively white hero. In Irish, cu, among other meanings, is a dog, greyhound, champion, hero, warrior.” Banquo was a character in Shakespeare’s Macbeth.

Dousabel, Dowsabel
“A female name, said to be derived from Fr. douce et belle, sweet and fair.” Most books define these as variants of Dulcibella (Latin dulcis “sweet” + bella “beautiful”).

“A Gaelic name of local origin, viz. from Drymen, co. Stirling, from druim monadh, back of the hill.”

Dubhdeasa, Dudeasa
“An old Irish female name, signifying ‘a dark-haired beauty’ (dubh, and deas beautiful).” According to Wiktionary, deas does mean “pretty,” and also “nice,” “honest,” “straight” and “right (as opposed to wrong).”

“An old Irish name derived from each a steed, marcach a rider.”

“An old Irish name derived from each a steed, milidh a knight.”

“A Welsh name. From uniaum, upright, perfect, just; lit. right, straight, direct, like iniawn.”

Eochaidh, “pronounced Eochy or Eohy”
“An old Irish name signifying a horseman or knight; from each or eoch, a steed. According to the Annals of Ireland it has been Anglicised Achy, and Latinised Eochadius, Achadius, and Achaius.”

“An old Irish female name, signifying a honeysuckle of ringlets (feith-failge).” That meaning doesn’t make a lot of sense to me…I wonder if it shouldn’t read “ringlets of honeysuckle” instead?

“A female baptismal name. One writer says Gesana, or rather Gesina, is a very common female name in Friesland, and not unknown in other parts of the Netherlands. According to others Gesana is a Spanish name, and of Scriptural origin. It is scarcely Scriptural, and is probably derived from the ending of some feminine diminutive.”

“If of Celtic origin this name might translate ‘willow marsh.'”

“Found as a male name at the present day. From A. S. hengest, which Lye renders ‘cantherius, caballus,’ i.e. gelding, horse.” According to Encyclopedia Britannica (the book, not the baby) Hengist and Horsa were “brothers and legendary leaders of the first Anglo-Saxon settlers in Britain.”

“An old baptismal name derived from L. idoneus, fit, […] proper.” According to Behind the Name, Idonea is based on the Scandinavian name Iðunn, but was influenced by the Latin word idonea.

“A male name corrupted from Joshua.”

“A female name which some think to have been corrupted from Rabege, another form of Rebecca.”

“A name derived from Mwyngu or Munghu, the subsequent name of the Pictish saint Kentigern. It may be derived from mwyn, tender, kind, mild, gentle, courteous, affable, with the addition of og, as a diminutive.”

“A baptismal name signifying little Nap–that is, Napoleon.”

“A baptismal name often found in Hertfordshire. One writer suggests that it may be from L. pertenuia, very slender. It has been more probably corrupted from the Scripture place-name Bethany.”

“A female name. The Tyne Mercury of 3rd November, 1829, gives a ‘Shepherdess Speedy.’ The name was no doubt derived from the occupation, like the male names Pastor and Le Pastur, found in the Hundred Rolls.”

“Found as an old baptismal name, said to mean God’s star.” Presumably based on the Latin words theos, “god,” and aster, “star.”

“An old Irish name signifying ‘a man of hospitality,’ derived from tomailt, provisions.”

Uther, Uthyr
“A Welsh name derived from uthr, signifying awful, wonderful, astonishing, terrific, horrible.”

The book also mentioned the battle-inspired baby names Crimea and Ulundi. (The Battle of Ulundi, fought in 1879, was the last major battle of the Anglo-Zulu War.)

Source: Charnock, Richard Stephen. Prænomina; or, The Etymology of the Principal Christian Names of Great Britain and Ireland. London: Trubner & Co., 1882.

Name Quotes for the Weekend #27

Only the right name gives beings and things their reality. The wrong name makes everything unreal. -by Michael Ende, author of The Neverending Story

From Michael Ende, author of The Neverending Story:

Nur der richtige Name gibt allen Wesen und Dingen ihre Wirklichkeit. Der falsche Name macht alles unwirklich.


Only the right name gives beings and things their reality. The wrong name makes everything unreal.

(Discovered on my never-ending quest to figure out how Ende coined Atreyu.)

From a late 1879 issue of Notes and Queries:

I have met a boy named Washington christened General George, a girl named Togotubuline, and, still more extraordinary, a boy called Wonderful Counsellor (from Isaiah ix. 6).

From the BuzzFeed video If Asians Said The Stuff White People Say:

Do you have a normal name too, or just your white name?

From the BuzzFeed video If Black People Said The Stuff White People Say:

Your name is so easy to spell and pronounce. Is it, like, really easy to get a job?

From the BuzzFeed video If Latinos Said The Stuff White People Say:

-How do you say your name again?
-I love how you pronounce it. One more time?
-God, I could never say it like that!

From “High Sounding Names,” an article published in the Cambridge Sentinel in late 1909:

The English society reporter for the last two or three seasons has had to record the doings of debutantes bearing distinguished surnames, prefaced by such disconcerting Christian–rather un-Christian–names as Venetia, Aurea, Ela, Linnie, Eldrydd, Dulcibella, Ganfreda, Laline, Morwenna and Lelgarde.

From the essay “The Joy of Being Called Morven Crumlish” by the awesomely named Morven Crumlish (via British Baby Names):

I like having an unusual name. The Morven part is not so uncommon in Scotland – most people I meet know another Morven, and I know at least half a dozen. I once ended up in the pub with two other Morvens, which got funnier as the night wore on. Added to the Crumlish, though, my name is, I think, unique. “There can’t be more than one Morven Crumlish!” is something I hear a lot, when the different parts of my life accidentally collide, which makes it difficult to misbehave. In the past my name has become an abstraction. “So this is what a Morven Crumlish looks like,” said the porters who wheeled me down to get my tonsils removed, reducing me to an indefinite object.

(Here are some other very Scottish names.)

Oddball English Names, 17th and 18th Centuries

One of the sources I used for yesterday’s post on Ono Titchiner was a book full of 17th and 18th century marriage records from Surrey.

In the introduction, the author listed some of the more notable names to be found in the book:

There are some curious and uncommon Christian names from Biblical and Classical sources; amongst those of females, Achsa, Adeliza, Aphara, Anastasia, Aquila, Avarillar, Bathana, Bedia, Bethia, Cassandra, Caroline-Shepherdess, Celeste, Clementia, Damaris, Dionisia, Dufiner, Dulcibella, Eleanor, Emmaritta, Emlin, Euphemia, Grachauna, Gratitude, Hephzibah, Israel, Jacobinea, Jaminia, Juliana, Kimbra, Melior, Milbrough, Pamelia, Parthenia, Paterniller, Pleasant-Furs, Protesia, Silvestria, Sina, Statira, Tamar, Tempearance, Theodosia, Tryphena, “Virgin” [Price]; and amongst males those of Ananias, Bivel, Calverley, Chrusophilus, Demetrius, Deodatus, Derik, Emmet, Eusebius, Ezekiel, Fretwill, Gershom, Haman, Haseldine [Crab-tree], Jonah, Lazarus, Nazareth, “Offspring” [Brown], Ono, Prew, Purchas, Redhead [Eagle], Rulove, Sills [Gibbons], Theophilus, Truth, Uphill, Ward, Wintz, Zacheus, Zenas, Zeuler.

It’s interesting to note that a few of the above (like Juliana and Jonah) are now commonplace.

And I could imagine a few others (Tamar? Lazarus?) becoming trendy in the near future.

Which of these names do you like best?

Source: Bax, Alfred Ridley. Allegations for Marriage Licences Issued by the Commissary Court of Surrey Between 1673-1770. Norwich: Goose & Son, 1907.