How popular is the baby name Edmond in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Edmond and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Edmond.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Edmond

Number of Babies Named Edmond

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Edmond

What Would You Name the Two Frenchmen?

The image below, of the Boulevard du Temple in Paris, was captured in early 1838 by Louis Daguerre, inventor of the daguerreotype.

It may be the earliest surviving photograph of a person. Two people, actually. Both are in the lower left:

Daguerreotype: Boulevard du Temple

Here’s a close-up:

Boulevard du Temple, detail

The standing man is getting his shoe shined, and the other man (partially obscured) is doing the shoe-shining.

Of all the people on the sidewalk that day, these were the only two to stay still long enough (about 10 minutes) to be captured in the image.

Now for the fun part!

What would you name these two Frenchmen?

Let’s pretend you’re writing a book set in Paris in the 1830s, and these are two of your characters. What names would you give them?

Here’s a long list of traditional French male names, to get you started:

Abel
Absolon
Achille
Adam
Adolphe
Adrien
Aimé
Alain
Alban
Albert
Alexandre
Alfred
Alphonse
Amaury
Amroise
Amédée
Anatole
André
Anselme
Antoine
Antonin
Apollinaire
Ariel
Aristide
Armand
Arnaud
Arsène
Arthur
Aubert
Aubin
Auguste
Augustin
Aurèle
Aurélien
Baptiste
Barnabé
Barthélémy
Basile
Bastien
Benjamin
Benoit
Bernard
Bertrand
Blaise
Boniface
Bruno
Calixte
Camille
Céleste
Célestin
Césaire
César
Charles
Christian
Christophe
Clair
Claude
Clément
Clovis
Constant
Constantin
Corentin
Corin
Corneille
Cosme
Cyril
Damien
Daniel
David
Denis
Déodat
Désiré
Didier
Dieudonné
Dimitri
Diodore
Dominique
Donat
Donatien
Edgar
Edgard
Edmé
Edmond
Édouard
Élie
Eloi
Émeric
Émile
Émilien
Emmanuel
Enzo
Éric
Ermenegilde
Ernest
Ethan
Étienne
Eugène
Eustache
Évariste
Évrard
Fabien
Fabrice
Félicien
Félix
Ferdinand
Fernand
Fiacre
Firmin
Florence
Florent
Florentin
Florian
Francis
François
Frédéric
Gabriel
Gaël
Gaëtan
Gaspard
Gaston
Gaubert
Geoffroy
Georges
Gérard
Géraud
Germain
Gervais
Ghislain
Gilbert
Gilles
Gratien
Grégoire
Guatier
Guillaume
Gustave
Guy
Hector
Henri
Herbert
Hercule
Hervé
Hilaire
Hippolyte
Honoré
Horace
Hubert
Hugues
Humbert
Hyacinthe
Ignace
Irénée
Isidore
Jacques
Jason
Jean
Jérémie
Jérôme
Joachim
Jocelyn
Joël
Jonathan
Joseph
Josse
Josué
Jourdain
Jules
Julien
Juste
Justin
Laurent
Laurentin
Lazare
Léandre
Léo
Léon
Léonard
Léonce
Léonide
Léopold
Lionel
Loïc
Lothaire
Louis
Loup
Luc
Lucas
Lucien
Lucrèce
Ludovic
Maël
Marc
Marcel
Marcellin
Marin
Marius
Martin
Mathieu
Mathis
Matthias
Maurice
Maxence
Maxime
Maximilien
Michaël
Michel
Modeste
Narcisse
Nathan
Nathanaël
Nazaire
Nicéphore
Nicodème
Nicolas
Noé
Noël
Norbert
Odilon
Olivier
Onésime
Pascal
Patrice
Paul
Philippe
Pierre
Placide
Pons
Prosper
Quentin
Rainier
Raoul
Raphaël
Raymond
Régis
Rémy
René
Reynaud
Richard
Robert
Roch
Rodolphe
Rodrigue
Roger
Roland
Romain
Rosaire
Ruben
Salomon
Samuel
Sébastien
Séraphin
Serge
Sévère
Séverin
Simon
Sylvain
Sylvestre
Télesphore
Théodore
Théophile
Thibault
Thierry
Thomas
Timothée
Toussaint
Urbain
Valentin
Valère
Valéry
Vespasien
Victor
Vincent
Vivien
Xavier
Yves
Zacharie

For some real-life inspiration, here are lists of famous 19th century and 20th century French people, courtesy of Wikipedia. Notice that many of the Frenchman have double-barreled, triple-barreled, even quadruple-barreled given names. (Daguerre himself was named Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre.)

Source: The First Photograph of a Human


Unique Baby Name – Oregon Territory

Remember when I blogged about the elusive baby name 54º 40′?

I still haven’t managed to track down anyone named 54º 40′, but I’ve discovered something close.

In April of 1845 — while the U.S. and Britain/Canada were embroiled in that dispute over the Oregon Territory (a.k.a. Columbia District) — Edmond and Eliza Winters of Ohio welcomed a baby boy.

They named him Oregon Territory.

In most places he’s listed as “Oregon Winters” or “Oregon T. Winters,” but on his daughter’s birth certificate his full name is written out (though misspelled) Oregon Teritory Winters:

oregon territory winters

(My search for a 54º 40′ continues, of course! I am not deterred. If there are any Fifty-Four Forties out there, I will find them. And blog them.)

Halley, the Periodic Baby Name

Halley's Comet 1910In 1705, English astronomer Edmond Halley theorized that three historic comets (which had appeared in 1531, 1607, and 1682) were actually a single periodic comet that would return again in 1758.

He was correct–the comet returned in 1758, just as Halley had predicted. So it was named Comet Halley in his honor in 1759.

Since then, Halley’s Comet has flown through the inner Milky Way three times: in 1835, 1910 and 1986. How did these appearances affect the usage of the baby name Halley? Let’s take a look…

Halley’s Comet in 1835

It seems that people were well aware of the comet in 1835. Its appearance was even commemorated with a new type of jewelry — the comet brooch, which had a distinct head and a tail, just like the comet. Here’s an example:

Halley's Comet Brooch

But the SSA didn’t start collecting baby name data until 1880, and I haven’t had much luck with the census and other historical data, so I don’t know how many babies (if any) were named after Halley’s Comet this year.

Halley’s Comet in 1910

Halley appeared on the SSA’s baby name list for the very first time, both for boys and for girls, in 1910. In fact, it was the top debut name for boys.

  • 1913: 5 baby boys named Halley, unlisted for baby girls
  • 1912: 6 baby boys named Halley, unlisted for baby girls
  • 1911: 5 baby boys named Halley, unlisted for baby girls
  • 1910: 11 baby girls and 12 baby boys named Halley [debut x2]
  • 1909: unlisted for both genders
  • 1908: unlisted for both genders

But the SSA data didn’t start reflecting real numbers until the ’30s. So I checked the SSDI, which indicated that the total number of babies with the first name Halley were actually much higher:

  • 1913: 6 babies named Halley
  • 1912: 15 babies named Halley
  • 1911: 8 babies named Halley
  • 1910: 119 babies named Halley
  • 1909: 14 people named Halley born
  • 1908: 3 people named Halley born

Some of the Halleys named specifically for the comet include:

  • Halley Reed Palmer, boy, born on May 10, 1910, to Mr. and Mrs. John Palmer of Milton, Oregon.
  • Halley Comett Johnston, boy, born on April 13, 1910, to Jessie Johnston and Addie Webb of North Carolina.

Parents also used different spellings and placements of Halley. Here’s what happened to the first name Hallie in 1910, for instance, according to the SSDI:

  • 1913: 280 babies named Hallie born
  • 1912: 328 babies named Hallie born
  • 1911: 385 babies named Hallie born
  • 1910: 520 babies named Hallie born
  • 1909: 392 babies named Hallie born
  • 1908: 353 babies named Hallie born

I also found 1910 babies named Halie Comet Wood (boy), Estyr Halley Abrams (girl), Comet Halley Briggs (boy), and Aerial Comet Roath (boy).

Speaking of Comet…the SSDI tells me at least 10 people were named Comet in 1910, and that one of these 10 happened to have the surname Halley. Also born in 1910: a Comette, a Cometniss, a Cometa, and two Comettas.

Halley’s Comet in 1986

Halley was given another big boost by the comet in 1986:

  • 1989: 56 baby girls named Halley, unlisted for baby boys
  • 1988: 71 baby girls named Halley, unlisted for baby boys
  • 1987: 69 baby girls named Halley, unlisted for baby boys
  • 1986: 332 baby girls and 21 baby boys named Halley
  • 1985: 147 baby girls and 10 baby boys named Halley
  • 1984: 25 baby girls named Halley, unlisted for baby boys

The surge in usage bumped Halley into the girls’ top 1,000 for the first (and only) time in 1986:

  • 1987: Halley ranked 1,737th
  • 1986: Halley ranked 581st
  • 1985: Halley ranked 1,025th

The only Halley-baby I noticed in the newspapers this year was from Canada: Halley Marie Mullen, a baby girl born to Susan and Brendan Mullen of Ottawa on 4 January 1986.

And, again, there were plenty of alternative spellings. Here’s what happened to Hallie in 1986:

  • 1989: 237 baby girls named Hallie, unlisted for baby boys
  • 1988: 232 baby girls named Hallie, unlisted for baby boys
  • 1987: 210 baby girls named Hallie, unlisted for baby boys
  • 1986: 267 baby girls named Hallie, unlisted for baby boys
  • 1985: 195 baby girls and 7 baby boys named Hallie
  • 1984: 164 baby girls baby girls named Hallie, unlisted for baby boys

Among the SSA debut names for 1986 we find Hayleigh (9 babies), Hailley (6) and Haylea (6).

Halley’s Comet in 2061

Halley’s Comet is due back in mid-2061. Do you think we’ll see a spike in the number of babies named Halley that year? Why or why not?

Sources:

  • “Names Baby After the Comet.” Spokesman-Review 22 May 1910: 1.
  • “Parents hope Halley sees comet’s return.” Ottawa Citizen 7 Jan. 1986: B2.
  • “Semi-Weekly News.” Deseret Evening News 20 May 1910: 12.
  • “Squints Slip on the ‘Scope.” Los Angeles Times 20 May 1910: I2.
  • U.S. SSDI (current as of February 28, 2014)

Baby Name Needed – Latin or Italian Name for Baby #1

A reader named Claudia is expecting her first baby (gender unknown). She’s looking for a Latin or Italian baby name.

She mentions that her middle name is Elisabetta, the baby’s father is named Simon Edmond, and the baby’s surname will be a 2-syllable D-name similar to Downie.

Here are some names that I think might work:

Adriana
Antonia
Augusta
Aurelia
Camilla
Clementina
Cecilia
Daria
Emilia
Eugenia
Fabia/Fabiana/Fabiola
Felicia
Frances/Francesca
Flora/Floriana
Julia
Isidora
Laura
Livia/Liviana
Lorenza
Lucia/Luciana
Marcella
Marina
Martina
Nunzia
Octavia/Ottavia
Paula/Paola
Philippa/Filippa
Piera/Pietra
Renata
Romana
Sabina
Sebastiana
Silvia/Silvana
Valentina
Victoria/Vittoria
Vincenza
Adrian
Antonio/Antony
Augusto
Aurelio
Camillo
Clemente
Cecil
Dario
Emilio/Emil
Eugene/Eugenio
Fabian/Fabiano
Felix
Francis/Francesco
Florian/Floriano
Julius/Julian
Isidore/Isidoro
Lauro
Livio
Lorenzo/Laurence
Lucian/Luciano
Marcello
Marino
Martin/Martino
Nunzio
Octavian/Ottavio
Paul/Paolo
Philip/Filippo
Piero/Pietro
Renato
Roman/Romano
Sabino
Sebastian/Sebastiano
Silvio/Silvano
Valentino/Valentine
Victor/Vittorio
Vincent/Vincenzo

Which of the above do you like best?

What other Latin and Italian names would you suggest to Claudia?