How popular is the baby name Ela in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Ela and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Ela.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.

Popularity of the Baby Name Ela

Number of Babies Named Ela

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Ela

Popular Baby Names in England and Wales, 2015

According to data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the most popular baby names in England and Wales last year were (again) Amelia and Oliver.

Here are the top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2015:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Amelia, 5,158 baby girls
2. Olivia, 4,853
3. Emily, 3,893
4. Isla, 3,474
5. Ava, 3,414
6. Ella, 3,028
7. Jessica, 2,937
8. Isabella, 2,876
9. Mia, 2,842
10. Poppy, 2,816
1. Oliver, 6,941 baby boys
2. Jack, 5,371
3. Harry, 5,308
4. George, 4,869
5. Jacob, 4,850
6. Charlie, 4,831
7. Noah, 4,148
8. William, 4,083
9. Thomas, 4,075
10. Oscar, 4,066

In the girls’ top 10, Ella and Mia replace Lily (now 13th) and Sophie (now 11th).

In the boys’ top 10, Noah (the top name in the U.S. right now) replace James (11th).

In the girls’ top 100, Penelope, Mila, Clara, Arabella, Maddison and Aria replace Lydia (now 103rd), Faith (104th), Mollie (105th), Brooke (107th), Isabel (110th) and Amy (117th).

In the boys’ top 100, Jaxon, Roman, Reggie and Carter replace Owen (now 101st), Robert (105th), Joey (117th) and Finlay (123rd).

Here are some of last year’s rare baby names, each given to either 3, 4 or 5 babies:

Rare Girl Names Rare Boy Names
Aarzoo, Autumn-Lily, Boglarka, Comfort, Edna, Enxi, Euphemia, Flourish, Fozia, Gabia, Jupiter, Lady, Lleucu, Llio, Merveille, Nectaria, Pebbles, Peony, Prisca, Purity, Quorra, Reisel, Sloka, Tuba, Venice, Vimbainashe, Ylva Alffi, Bam, Bright, Crimea, Cuthbert, Efezino, Elimelech, Fyfe, Ghyll, Gryff, James-Dean, Jamesdean, Kushagra, Ignatius, Marmaduke, Math, Mio, Osagie, Otso, Pip, Przemyslaw, Sherlock, Swayley, Ringo, Testimony, Thierno, Zephyrus

(Crimea is intriguing, isn’t it? It was used as a baby name in the 1850s, during the Crimean War, but this is the first time I’ve seen it on a modern name list.)

And what about Welsh names?

Welsh Girl Names Welsh Boy Names
  • Seren (“star”) ranks 17th in Wales
  • Ffion (“foxglove”), 20th
  • Megan, 27th
    • & 76th overall
  • Mali, 45th
  • Alys, 66th
  • Carys (“love”), 72nd
  • Efa, 73rd
  • Cadi, 82nd
  • Lili, 85th
  • Lowri, 88th
  • Eira (“snow”), 92nd
  • Ela, 97th
  • Elin, 97th
  • Dylan ranks 13th in Wales
    • & 38th overall
  • Osian, 25th
  • Harri, 27th
  • Jac, 33rd
  • Rhys, 34th
  • Evan, 37th
  • Tomos, 47th
  • Cai, 51st
  • Ioan, 56th
  • Morgan, 67th
  • Elis, 66th
  • Hari, 82nd
  • Gethin (“swarthy”), 88th
  • Iestyn, 88th
  • Macsen, 92nd
  • Owain, 92nd
  • Ifan, 96th

Finally, if you’d like to go back another year, here are the England and Wales rankings for 2014.

Source: Baby names in England and Wales: 2015

Names in the News: Pauline, Ela Melanie, Doctor James

Three baby names that have been in the news recently:

  • Pauline, born in March, is the third child of actor Vin Diesel. She was named in honor of Diesel’s “Fast and the Furious” co-star and Paul Walker, though it should be noted that Diesel also happens to have a twin brother named Paul.
  • Ela Melanie, born March 30th in Brooklyn, is the first-ever baby born in an Uber car. Her name pays tribute to her late paternal grandfather, Melvin.
  • Doctor James, born in March in Sierra Leone, arrived while his mother was at an Ebola treatment center. He was named after British doctor James Meiring. Both mother and baby ended up testing negative for Ebola, luckily, and were soon discharged.

Sources: Vin Diesel Welcomes Daughter Pauline, Baby born in back of Uber on way to hospital, British Ebola worker risked his life to help deliver baby

Name Quotes for the Weekend #27

Only the right name gives beings and things their reality. The wrong name makes everything unreal. -by Michael Ende, author of The Neverending Story

From Michael Ende, author of The Neverending Story:

Nur der richtige Name gibt allen Wesen und Dingen ihre Wirklichkeit. Der falsche Name macht alles unwirklich.


Only the right name gives beings and things their reality. The wrong name makes everything unreal.

(Discovered on my never-ending quest to figure out how Ende coined Atreyu.)

From a late 1879 issue of Notes and Queries:

I have met a boy named Washington christened General George, a girl named Togotubuline, and, still more extraordinary, a boy called Wonderful Counsellor (from Isaiah ix. 6).

From the BuzzFeed video If Asians Said The Stuff White People Say:

Do you have a normal name too, or just your white name?

From the BuzzFeed video If Black People Said The Stuff White People Say:

Your name is so easy to spell and pronounce. Is it, like, really easy to get a job?

From the BuzzFeed video If Latinos Said The Stuff White People Say:

-How do you say your name again?
-I love how you pronounce it. One more time?
-God, I could never say it like that!

From “High Sounding Names,” an article published in the Cambridge Sentinel in late 1909:

The English society reporter for the last two or three seasons has had to record the doings of debutantes bearing distinguished surnames, prefaced by such disconcerting Christian–rather un-Christian–names as Venetia, Aurea, Ela, Linnie, Eldrydd, Dulcibella, Ganfreda, Laline, Morwenna and Lelgarde.

From the essay “The Joy of Being Called Morven Crumlish” by the awesomely named Morven Crumlish (via British Baby Names):

I like having an unusual name. The Morven part is not so uncommon in Scotland – most people I meet know another Morven, and I know at least half a dozen. I once ended up in the pub with two other Morvens, which got funnier as the night wore on. Added to the Crumlish, though, my name is, I think, unique. “There can’t be more than one Morven Crumlish!” is something I hear a lot, when the different parts of my life accidentally collide, which makes it difficult to misbehave. In the past my name has become an abstraction. “So this is what a Morven Crumlish looks like,” said the porters who wheeled me down to get my tonsils removed, reducing me to an indefinite object.

(Here are some other very Scottish names.)