How popular is the baby name Eleonora in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Eleonora and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Eleonora.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Eleonora

Number of Babies Named Eleonora

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Eleonora

Do Americans Have an Obsession with Nicknames?

A couple of weeks ago, Judith left the following comment on a Five-Name Friday post.

I would love it if you dedicated a blog article to the American obsession with nicknames. Being European this really baffles me. Over here we give our children the name we like best, whether this is a long name (i.e. Michael) or a short one (i.e. Mike). A nickname might pop up in due course but is not something that you force (or even think about) beforehand. If you want your child to be called Ella, why would you name her Eleonora only to shorten it to Ella? Like I said it baffles me and I would love to know the background of this phenomenon.

Such an interesting question!

There’s certainly a difference between Americans and Europeans when it comes up nickname usage. You can see it comparing the top names in the U.S. with the top names in England — boy names especially. The English top 20 includes many more informal names (Jack, Harry, Charlie, Alfie, Freddie, Archie) than the U.S. top 20.

Seems to me that both regions are concerned with nicknames, but handle them in very different ways. Europeans are reasonably comfortable putting nicknames on birth certificates, while Americans are not as comfortable turning nicknames into legal names.

So what’s behind these diverging trends? I’m not sure that there’s a single answer, but here are a few theories. (Please excuse me ahead of time for making sweeping generalizations about Americans and Europeans.)

Formality differences
Europeans tend to be more relaxed than Americans, both in terms of daily life/habits and in terms of viewpoints. Maybe this informality leads them to prefer the informal names. (Or at least doesn’t make them feel obligated to use formal names.)

Work attitude differences
Americans tend to be more career-focused than Europeans. Perhaps this outlook makes them feel that it’s smart to have a formal name to fall back on for future professional use — that having a nickname-only name could be limiting.

Class differences
This theory, which is somewhat like the work attitude theory, comes from an Encyclopedia Britannica* blogger and concerns the U.S. and the UK specifically:

Perhaps the difference has to do with class. Americans may shy away from bestowing diminutives upon their children because they suspect that such “cutesy” names will prevent their children from climbing the ranks and becoming CEOs. In the more-rigid class system of the U.K., on the other hand, some parents might believe that that sort of advancement is so unlikely that it’s not worth letting it affect their choice of a name. So Charlie it is.

Gender-switch differences (pertains to boy names only)
In America, many formerly male/unisex names with “-ee” endings (e.g., Ashley, Avery, Bailey, Ellery, Riley) have turned into girl names. This might make Americans more hesitant to permanently attach diminutives with similar endings to baby boys.

Which (if any) of these theories do you think makes the most sense? What others can you think of?

Source: How to Tell a British Baby from an American: Differences in Naming Trends, Judith’s comment

*Did you know about the New York woman named Encyclopedia Britannica?


The Names of the World’s Oldest Living Siblings

On June 1, 2012, Guinness World Records verified that the nine Melis siblings (six women, three men) of Perdasdefogu, Italy, were the oldest living siblings in the world. That day, their combined age was 818 years and 205 days.

Here are the names of all nine:

  1. Consolata (b. August 22, 1907)
  2. Claudina (b. June 30, 1913)
  3. Maria (b. June 12, 1915)
  4. Antonino (b. May 5, 1919)
  5. Concetta (b. February 24, 1921)
  6. Adolfo (b. October 20, 1923)
  7. Vitalio (b. February 6, 1926)
  8. Fida Vitalia (b. October 5, 1931)
  9. Mafalda (b. June 16, 1934) — nicknamed la piccolina, or “the little one”

Their parents were Francesco and Eleonora Melis, both born in the 1880s.

To what does Alfonso attribute their collective longevity? “We eat genuine food, meaning lots of minestrone and little meat and we are always working. Every free moment I have I am down at my vineyard or at the allotment where I grow beans, aubergines, peppers and potatoes.”

Which of the nine names do you like best?

Sources: In Sardinia, world’s longest-living family credits hard work, diet, family, Sardinian siblings credit minestrone soup for world record age

Edgar Allan Poe Names – Lenore, Ligeia, Prospero

Edgar Allan PoeEdgar Allan Poe was born 202 years ago today. To celebrate, let’s check out some of the names Poe used in his poetry, short fiction, and longer works:

Girl Names:

  • Ada
  • Alessandra
  • Annabel Lee
  • Berenice
  • Eleonora
  • Ermengarde
  • Evangeline
  • Eulalie
  • Fanny
  • Helen
  • Jacinta
  • Lalage
  • Lenore
  • Ligeia
  • Madeline
  • Morella
  • Ulalume (rhymes with tomb)

Boy names:

  • Arthur
  • Augustus
  • Baldazzar
  • Benito
  • Cornelius
  • Dirk
  • Egaeus
  • Ernest
  • Fortunato
  • Julius
  • Jupiter
  • Prospero
  • Richard
  • Rupert
  • Roderick
  • Ugo
  • William

I suppose we could include Raven and Usher as well, though technically Poe never used them as first names.