How popular is the baby name Enzo in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Enzo and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Enzo.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Enzo

Number of Babies Named Enzo

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Enzo

What Would You Name the Two Frenchmen?

The image below, of the Boulevard du Temple in Paris, was captured in early 1838 by Louis Daguerre, inventor of the daguerreotype.

It may be the earliest surviving photograph of a person. Two people, actually. Both are in the lower left:

Daguerreotype: Boulevard du Temple

Here’s a close-up:

Boulevard du Temple, detail

The standing man is getting his shoe shined, and the other man (partially obscured) is doing the shoe-shining.

Of all the people on the sidewalk that day, these were the only two to stay still long enough (about 10 minutes) to be captured in the image.

Now for the fun part!

What would you name these two Frenchmen?

Let’s pretend you’re writing a book set in Paris in the 1830s, and these are two of your characters. What names would you give them?

Here’s a long list of traditional French male names, to get you started:

Abel
Absolon
Achille
Adam
Adolphe
Adrien
Aimé
Alain
Alban
Albert
Alexandre
Alfred
Alphonse
Amaury
Amroise
Amédée
Anatole
André
Anselme
Antoine
Antonin
Apollinaire
Ariel
Aristide
Armand
Arnaud
Arsène
Arthur
Aubert
Aubin
Auguste
Augustin
Aurèle
Aurélien
Baptiste
Barnabé
Barthélémy
Basile
Bastien
Benjamin
Benoit
Bernard
Bertrand
Blaise
Boniface
Bruno
Calixte
Camille
Céleste
Célestin
Césaire
César
Charles
Christian
Christophe
Clair
Claude
Clément
Clovis
Constant
Constantin
Corentin
Corin
Corneille
Cosme
Cyril
Damien
Daniel
David
Denis
Déodat
Désiré
Didier
Dieudonné
Dimitri
Diodore
Dominique
Donat
Donatien
Edgar
Edgard
Edmé
Edmond
Édouard
Élie
Eloi
Émeric
Émile
Émilien
Emmanuel
Enzo
Éric
Ermenegilde
Ernest
Ethan
Étienne
Eugène
Eustache
Évariste
Évrard
Fabien
Fabrice
Félicien
Félix
Ferdinand
Fernand
Fiacre
Firmin
Florence
Florent
Florentin
Florian
Francis
François
Frédéric
Gabriel
Gaël
Gaëtan
Gaspard
Gaston
Gaubert
Geoffroy
Georges
Gérard
Géraud
Germain
Gervais
Ghislain
Gilbert
Gilles
Gratien
Grégoire
Guatier
Guillaume
Gustave
Guy
Hector
Henri
Herbert
Hercule
Hervé
Hilaire
Hippolyte
Honoré
Horace
Hubert
Hugues
Humbert
Hyacinthe
Ignace
Irénée
Isidore
Jacques
Jason
Jean
Jérémie
Jérôme
Joachim
Jocelyn
Joël
Jonathan
Joseph
Josse
Josué
Jourdain
Jules
Julien
Juste
Justin
Laurent
Laurentin
Lazare
Léandre
Léo
Léon
Léonard
Léonce
Léonide
Léopold
Lionel
Loïc
Lothaire
Louis
Loup
Luc
Lucas
Lucien
Lucrèce
Ludovic
Maël
Marc
Marcel
Marcellin
Marin
Marius
Martin
Mathieu
Mathis
Matthias
Maurice
Maxence
Maxime
Maximilien
Michaël
Michel
Modeste
Narcisse
Nathan
Nathanaël
Nazaire
Nicéphore
Nicodème
Nicolas
Noé
Noël
Norbert
Odilon
Olivier
Onésime
Pascal
Patrice
Paul
Philippe
Pierre
Placide
Pons
Prosper
Quentin
Rainier
Raoul
Raphaël
Raymond
Régis
Rémy
René
Reynaud
Richard
Robert
Roch
Rodolphe
Rodrigue
Roger
Roland
Romain
Rosaire
Ruben
Salomon
Samuel
Sébastien
Séraphin
Serge
Sévère
Séverin
Simon
Sylvain
Sylvestre
Télesphore
Théodore
Théophile
Thibault
Thierry
Thomas
Timothée
Toussaint
Urbain
Valentin
Valère
Valéry
Vespasien
Victor
Vincent
Vivien
Xavier
Yves
Zacharie

For some real-life inspiration, here are lists of famous 19th century and 20th century French people, courtesy of Wikipedia. Notice that many of the Frenchman have double-barreled, triple-barreled, even quadruple-barreled given names. (Daguerre himself was named Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre.)

Source: The First Photograph of a Human


The Name Francesco Gets a Boost in Italy

The name Francesco became the top baby boy name in Italy after Pope Francis was elected in March, according to name researcher Enzo Caffarelli.

He said:

The name ‘Francesco’ is the most popular name for newborns in Italy so far in 2013, and it is evident that the impact of the former Jose Mario Bergoglio is the main contributing factor to the name’s new popularity.

This sounds like interesting news…until you consider that the name Francesco was already very popular in Italy. It was the most popular name in the entire country in 2011, in fact. (I haven’t seen the 2012 name data yet.)

So…yeah. Kinda anticlimactic.

Sources: The Pope Francis effect: ‘Francesco’ now Italy’s most popular baby name, Behind the Name: Most Popular Names for Births in Italy 2011

Unusual Baby Names from Quebec – Awesome, Dung, Jde, Luzer

Over the weekend, I read through the giant database of Quebec baby names for 2008. Most of the names there were familiar English or French names. A few were (very long!) Native American names. Here are some that stood out:

  • Anakin & Anakyn (male) – Five of the former, two of the latter.
  • Archippe (male) – Means “horse-master” in ancient Greek. Not a name I see every day.
  • Awesome (male) – No pressure to live up to your name or anything.
  • Coatl (male) – Means “snake” in Nahuatl.
  • Dakota-Edison (male) – Strikes me as rather American-sounding for a Canadian name.
  • Dune (female) – Named for the seashore or for sci-fi?
  • Dung (male) – One of those names that gets lost in translation.
  • Eileen Osiris (female) – Interesting combination.
  • Ellliot (male) – Another triple-L in Quebec!
  • Elyjah Woody (male) – Elijah Wood fan, perhaps.
  • Enzo Versace (male) – Sounds expensive.
  • Jde (male) – Pronounced…Jade? Jude? Hm.
  • Junior Aroma (male) – Less offensive than Senior Aroma.
  • Kaleb-Wolf (male) – Reminds me of Nakoa-Wolf.
  • Kierkegaard II (male) – This one cracks me up. My favorite, hands down.
  • Lady Victoria (female) – The most regal-sounding entry.
  • Lazuli (female) – From lapis lazuli, no doubt.
  • Loveland-Jacobs (female) – Looks like a surname, sounds like a law firm.
  • Luna Mist (female) – There’s water on the moon, but I don’t know about mist.
  • Luzer (male) – I hope it’s not pronounced the way I think it’s pronounced.
  • Maully (female) – Molly’s dark side?
  • Obama Kerby (male) and Stephan-Obama (male) – The only two Obama-names I noticed.
  • Owen-Walter (male) – I thought this combination was adorable.
  • Ramses-Emmanuel (male) – Should have a play date with Eileen Osiris.
  • Readily-Chang (male) – Sounds peppy, doesn’t it?
  • Ruly (female) – Better than unruly.
  • Schnobxxxxxxxxxxxx (male) – They couldn’t come up with anything better than this? Seriously?
  • Thunder-Jr (male) – Not as noisy as Thunder-Sr.
  • Tia-Maria (female) – Makes a better name than Kahlua.
  • Trevelle Anabelle (female) – Her parents are poets and didn’t even know it.
  • Tyler-Layden (male) – Why yes, the baby name pop charts are indeed Tyler-laden right now.
  • Velvili (female) – Kinda fun to say.
  • Vernadette (female) – I thought this was cute. Vernon + Bernadette, maybe?
  • Wyclef Jean (male) – There are fans…and then there are superfans.

Have an opinion about any of the above?

If you’ve perused the list yourself, do you remember spotting anything interesting?

Baby Name Needed – Spanish Name for Nadia’s Little Brother

A reader named Tamara is expecting a baby boy in May. She writes:

We are a bi-racial couple…he is Mexican and I am American (white), and are looking for a Spanish name for our little boy. Unfortunately, I don’t LOVE a lot of the Hispanic boy names, and we are having some trouble finding the perfect name.

So far, she and her fiance Oscar like the names Tiago and Gabriel…but here are the issues:

We need a good middle name to go with Tiago. And we haven’t gotten a lot of positive feedback on the name. And I feel like Gabriel is overused and doesn’t hold its own when paired with our daughter’s name, Nadia. And the two names don’t exactly flow well together, so pairing them up isn’t an option for us. Any suggestions? Middle names for Tiago? Or just different first names all together?

Here are some thoughts on Tiago and Gabriel:

  • Nicknames (e.g. Benji, Topher, Xander) sometimes loose their charm when used as stand-alone names, so people might like Tiago more if it were a nickname for Santiago. Santiago is currently ranked 200th, but I don’t think it will rise too much higher.
  • How about Diego? It’s not as hip as Tiago…but it’s got a similar sound, and, because it’s more familiar, it’ll probably get better feedback. In terms of popularity, Diego seems to be plateauing just outside the top 50.
  • I think Gabriel sounds fantastic with Nadia, personally. But it’s become popular recently (i.e. over 10,000 babies have been named Gabriel every year since 2001) and my hunch is that it will remain popular for a while to come. So I can understand wanting to avoid it for that reason.

Let’s see, middle names for Tiago…I think iambic names like Ramón, Raúl and Noé sound good after Tiago. I also like longer middles (e.g. Antonio, Mauricio).

Here are a few other ideas for first names:

Armando
Arturo
Elías
Iván
Lorenzo (Enzo)
Marcelo
Mateo
Rafael
Renato
Silvio
Ulises
Víctor

What other advice/suggestions would you offer Tamara?

Baby-Naming Trends in France – Clara, Sarah, Enzo, Hugo

According to the Elisabeth Vincentelli (whose article “You Are What Your Name Says You Are” was recently published in the New York Times), the big baby-naming trends in France are the letter “a” for girls (Clara, Sarah, Léa) and the letter “o” for boys (Mathéo, Enzo, Hugo).

Vincentelli also notes that, according to sociologist Philippe Besnard,

Until the 1970s the popularity of names trickled down from the upper classes. For instance, “Gilles” peaked in France’s high-society registry in 1942 and in the general population in 1960. That all changed in the 1980s, when the less wealthy and less educated turned into first-name innovators (perhaps caught up in fads spread by popular music and TV) while the rich rediscovered more traditional French-sounding names.

(Thank you to Nancy Friedman of Away With Words for letting me know about the article.