How popular is the baby name Eudora in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Eudora.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Eudora


Posts that Mention the Name Eudora

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: E

Looking for an uncommon girl name with a retro feel?

Here’s a list of rare female E-names associated with the earliest decades of cinema (1910s to 1940s).

For the names that have seen enough usage to appear in the SSA data, I’ve included links to popularity graphs.

*

Eadie
Eadie was a character name in multiple films, including The Girl from Missouri (1934) and The Hit Parade (1937).

  • Usage of the baby name Eadie.

Editha
Editha was a character name in multiple films, including The Children Pay (1916) and The Burglar (1917).

  • Usage of the baby name Editha.

Edwina
Edwina was a character name in multiple films, including The Flight of the Crow (short, 1913) and National Velvet (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Edwina.

Edythe
Edythe Chapman was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in New York in 1863. Edythe Sterling was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Missouri in 1886. Edythe was also a character name in multiple films, including Told in Colorado (1911) and The Repentant (1916).

  • Usage of the baby name Edythe.

Effie
Effie Shannon was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Massachusetts in 1867. Effie was also a character name in multiple films, including The Big Diamond Robbery (1929) and The Maltese Falcon (1931).

  • Usage of the baby name Effie.

Efra
Efra Cavendar was a character played by actress Dorothy Sebastian in the film The Unholy Night (1929).

Eily
Eily Malyon was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1940s. She was born in England in 1879. Eily was also a character played by actress Gene Gauntier in the film The Colleen Bawn (1911).

  • Usage of the baby name Eily.

Elba
Elba Allen was a character played by actress Beverly Bayne in the short film Every Inch a King (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Elba.

Eleanour
Eleanour was a character played by actress Alice Joyce in the film The Ace of Cads (1926).

Electra
Electra was a character played by actress Norma Phillips in the short film The Glow Worm (1913).

Elektra
Elektra was a character played by actress Mary Fuller in the short film Elektra (1910).

Elfie
Elfie was a character name in multiple films, including Regeneration (short, 1911) and The Easiest Way (1931).

  • Usage of the baby name Elfie.

Elga
Elga was a character played by actress Camilla Horn in the film The Return of Raffles (1933).

  • Usage of the baby name Elga.

Ellabella
Ellabella Jackson was a character played by actress Almira Sessions in the film Dixie Jamboree (1944).

Ellaline
Ellaline Terriss was an actress who appeared in films from the 1900s to the 1930s. She was born in the Falkland Islands in 1872. Her birth name was Mary Ellaline Terriss.

Ellean
Ellean Tanqueray was a character played by actress Marie Hemingway in the film The Second Mrs. Tanqueray (1916).

  • Usage of the baby name Ellean.

Ellinor
Ellinor was a character played by actress Valda Valkyrien in the film The Unwelcome Mother (1916).

Elmerada
Elmerada de Leon was a character played by actress Zasu Pitts in the film Professional Sweetheart (1933).

Elna
Elna Johnson was a character played by actress Wendy Barrie in the film The Saint in Palm Springs (1941).

  • Usage of the baby name Elna.

Elnora
Elnora Comstock was a character played by various actresses (such as Gloria Grey and Dorinda Clifton) in various movies called A Girl of the Limberlost, all based on the novel of the same name by Gene Stratton-Porter.

  • Usage of the baby name Elnora.

Elois
Elois Murree was a character played by actress Julia Swayne Gordon in the film The Painted World (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Elois.

Elspeth
Elspeth Dudgeon was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1950s. She was born in England in 1871. Elspeth was also a character name in multiple films, including Sentimental Tommy (1921) and The Storm Breaker (1925).

Elvia
Elvia Allman was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1960s. She was born in North Carolina in 1904.

  • Usage of the baby name Elvia.

Elvina
Elvina Grey was a character played by actress Marguerite Snow in the film The Veiled Woman (1922).

  • Usage of the baby name Elvina.

Elvira
Elvira was a character name in multiple films, including The Cuban Love Song (1931) and Moonlight in Vermont (1943).

  • Usage of the baby name Elvira.

Elvire
Elvire was a character played by actress Olga Demidoff in the short film The Death of Don Juan (1911).

Elviry
Elviry was a character played by June Weaver in various films of the late 1930s and early 1940s.

Elyane
Elyane Parizot was a character played by actress Maria Corda in the film Madame Wants No Children (1926).

  • Usage of the baby name Elyane.

Elyata
Elyata was a character played by actress Juanita Hansen in the film The Lost City (1920).

Elzbieta
Elzbieta was a character played by actress Julia Hurley in the film The Jungle (1914).

Emanuella
Emanuella was a character played by actress Mary Philbin in the film Drums of Love (1928).

Emica
Emica was a character played by actress Yvette Dugay in the film Heavenly Days (1944).

Emillia
Emillia was a character played by actress Carmel Myers in the film No Living Witness (1932).

Ena
Ena Gregory was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1930s. She was born in Australia in 1906. Ena was also a character played by actress Gloria Payton in the film The Faith of the Strong (1919).

  • Usage of the baby name Ena.

Encarnacion
Encarnacion was a character played by actress Lynn Bari in the film Blood and Sand (1941).

Enia
Enia was a character played by actress Edith Storey in the short film Warfare in the Skies (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Enia.

Enid
Enid Stamp-Taylor was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1940s. She was born in England in 1904. Enid was also a character name in multiple films, including The Chalice of Courage (1915) and Whatever She Wants (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Enid.

Enna
Enna was a character played by actress Florence La Badie in the film Their Golden Wedding (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Enna.

Enola
Enola Lane was a character played by actress Clara Williams in the short film The Surgeon (1912).

  • Usage of the baby name Enola.

Enrichetta
Enrichetta was a character played by actress Alida Valli in the film Two Orphans (1942).

Eponine
Eponine was a character played by actress Frances Drake in the film Les Miserabes (1935).

Erek
Princess Erek was a character played by actress Vera Lewis in the film The Only Thing (1925).

Erie
Erie McCadden was a character played by actress Sally O’Neil in the film The Girl on the Barge (1929).

  • Usage of the baby name Erie.

Erina
Erina Rodina was a character played by actress Rose Dione in the film The World and Its Women (1919).

  • Usage of the baby name Erina.

Erma
Erma Desmond was a character played by actress Ruth Roland in the film The Matrimonial Martyr (1916).

  • Usage of the baby name Erma.

Ermengarde
Ermengarde was a character played by actress Gertrude Short in the film The Little Princess (1917).

Ermina
Ermina was a character played by actress Gene Gauntier in the short film Captain Rivera’s Reward (1912).

  • Usage of the baby name Ermina.

Ermine
Ermine was a character played by actress Monaei Lindley in the film Her Secret (1933).

  • Usage of the baby name Ermine.

Ermintrud
Ermintrude was a character name in multiple films, including Maytime (1923) and Orchids and Ermine (1927).

Erna
Erna was a character played by actress Bunty Payne in the film A Voice in the Night (1941).

  • Usage of the baby name Erna.

Ernestine
Ernestine Gaines was an actress who appeared in films in the 1920s. Ernestine was also a character name in multiple films, including The Side Show of Life (1924) and Anne of Windy Poplars (1940).

Erni
Erni Gottlinger was a character played by actress Marlene Dietrich in the film Cafe Electric (1927).

Erolinda
Erolinda Vargas was a character played by actress Carmel Myers in the film The Kiss (1921).

Essene
Essene was a character played by actress Nan Christy in the short film A Modern Sphinx (1916).

Essie
Essie was a character name in multiple films, including Welcome Stranger (1924) and Ah, Wilderness! (1935).

  • Usage of the baby name Essie.

Estelita
Estelita Rodriguez was an actress who appeared in films from the 1940s to the 1960s. She was born in Cuba in 1928.

Esthey
Esthey Roberts was a character played by actress Zasu Pitts in the film Two Alone (1934).

Estrell
Estrell Wynn was a character played by actress Marguerite De La Motte in the film The Nut (1921).

Estrellita
Estrellita Estrada was a character played by actress Elena Verdugo in the film The Big Sombrero (1949).

Ethel

  • Ethel Wales was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1950s. She was born in New Jersey in 1878.
  • Ethel Griffies was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1960s. She was born in England in 1878.
  • Ethel Barrymore was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1950s. She was born in Pennsylvania in 1879.
  • Ethel Clayton was an actress who appeared in films from the 1900s to the 1940s. She was born in Illinois in 1882.
  • Ethel Grandin was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in New York in 1894.
  • Ethel Shannon was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Colorado in 1898.
  • Ethel Merman was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1980s. She was born in New York in 1908.

Ethel was also a character played by actress Evelyn Brent in the film Raffles, the Amateur Cracksman (1917).

  • Usage of the baby name Ethel.

Etheline
Etheline was a character played by actress Diane Bori in the film Big Town (1932).

Ethelreda
Ethelreda was a character played by actress Elisabeth Risdon in the film Slightly Tempted (1940).

Ethelyn
Ethelyn was a character played by actress Josephine Dunn in the film The Sin Sister (1929).

Ethlyne
Ethlyne Clair was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1930s. She was born in Alabama in 1904.

Ethne
Ethne was a character name in multiple films, including The Four Feathers (1929) and The Four Feathers (1939).

  • Usage of the baby name Ethne.

Ethona
Ethona was a character played by actress Florence Turner in the film Indian Romeo and Juliet (1912).

Ethyl
Ethyl Norcrosse was a character played by actress Leila Hyams in the film Spite Marriage (1929).

  • Usage of the baby name Ethyl.

Etiennette
Etiennette was a character played by actress Dany Robin in the film Gates of the Night (1946).

Ettie
Ettie was a character name in multiple films, including Werewolf of London (1935) and Heavenly Days (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Ettie.

Eudora
Eudora Mawdle was a character played by actress Ethel Wales in the film Our Leading Citizen (1922).

  • Usage of the baby name Eudora.

Eugenia
Eugenia Blondeau was a character played by actress Beverly Bayne in the film Pennington’s Choice (1915).

Eugenie
Eugenie Besserer was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in New York in 1868. Eugenie Forde was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in New York in 1879. Eugenie was also a character name in multiple films, including The Black Pearl (1928) and Piccadilly Jim (1936).

Eula
Eula Guy was an actress who appeared in films from 1930s to 1950s. She was born in Pennsylvania in 1894.

  • Usage of the baby name Eula.

Eulalia
Eulalia was a character played by actress Carmelita Geraghty in the film The Small Bachelor (1927).

Eulalie
Eulalie Jensen was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Missouri in 1884. Eulalie was also character played by actress Eileen Percy in the film The Pleasant Devil (1919).

Eulilah
Eulilah was a character played by actress Kathleen Burke in the film The Lion Man (1936).

Euphemia
Euphemia Jones was a character played by actress Flora Finch in the short film Mr. Bunny in Disguise (1914).

Europena
Europena was a character name in multiple films, including Lovey Mary (1926) and Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch (1934).

Eurydice
Eurydice was a character played by actress Mildred Harris in the film A Love Sublime (1917).

Evadne
Evadne was a character played by actress Katherine Lee in the film The Side Show of Life (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Evadne.

Eveline
Eveline Danvers was a character played by actress Ella Hall in the short film The Mistress of Deadwood Basin (1914).

Evelynda
Evelynda was a character played by actress Margaret Livingston in the film The Last Warning (1929).

Everild
Everild was a character played by actress Ruth Stonehouse in the short film Above the Abyss (1915).

Evvie
Evvie was a character played by actress Blanche Friderici in the film Stolen Love (1928).

  • Usage of the baby name Evvie.

Exquisitia
Exquisitia was a character played by actress Ethel Teare in the short film Adam’s Ancestors (1915).

*

Which of the above E-names do you like best?

Source: IMDb

Name Quotes #74: Chandler, Snehalatha, Teddy Jack

From the TV show Friends, a quote from character Chandler Bing:

You know, I can handle it. Handle’s my middle name. Actually it’s the, uh…the middle part of my first name.

From Cosmopolitan, a quote about the name of Cardi B’s sister Hennessy:

Yes, she’s named after the alcohol and yes, the story’s amazing.

While Bacardi is not Cardi B’s real name, Hennessy is most definitely her sister’s original moniker. Why? Because her father showed up drunk on Hennessy when she was born and insisted on naming her after his drink of choice.

From Rolling Stone, a quote about a baby named after a Gary Busey character:

[Leon] Russell’s son Teddy Jack, who was named after a Busey character from a regional TV show he performed on named Teddy Jack Eddy, produced Busey’s new project, his first solo release.

From the book Welty: A Life in Literature (1987), a quote from author Eudora Welty:

When I first began writing I didn’t realized the importance of names. I would just name characters anything. And then I realized how much it mattered, for cadence, and, for example, how families name their children in a kind of pattern, you know, everybody’s name beginning with B.

From the book Here at The New Yorker (1975) by Brendan Gill:

Indeed, there are writers remembered not for their novels but for their names: Mazo de la Roche, Ouida, Warwick Deeping.

From WYTV in Youngstown, Ohio, a quote about the history of Phalanx Station:

Phalanx Station was named after the local Trumbull Phalanx Company, which was not a business but a utopian community. […] It failed but the name remained. It became Phalanx Station after a railroad led the community southeast to Jefferson County, Ohio in the late 19th century. That failed, too, but again the name remained.

From Stuff.co.nz, a quote about a bright orange seagull with a fitting name:

Staff at the Buckinghamshire, England [animal] hospital say the gull somehow got curry or turmeric all over his feathers, which prevented him from flying properly. The bird, named Vinny after the popular Indian dish Vindaloo curry, put up a fight but eventually let the staff scrub his feathers.

From Best Life, a quote about Waverly, one of the most common town names in America:

Many of the 18 places in the United States called Waverly are named after Sir Walter Scott’s 1814 novel, Waverley. Not only is Waverly, Nebraska…named after the novel, but many of the city’s street names were also taken from characters within it.

(Here are more of the places named Waverly.)

From NDTV in India, a quote about names in the family of MA Sneha, the Tamil Nadu woman who is officially caste-less and religion-less:

In a country where a person’s name can denote his/her caste or religion, Sneha and her husband K. Parthibaraja have named their three daughters with a mix of Buddhist, Christian and Muslim names – Aadhirai Nasreen, Aadhila Irene and Aarifa Jessy.

[…]

Sneha’s two younger sisters have Muslim and Christian names – Mumtaj Suriya and Jennifer.

“My father-in-law PV Anandakrishnan and mother-in-law Manimozhi are both advocates, and belonged to different castes. They were rationalists and Leftists. Sneha was named after a Telangana girl Snehalatha died in police custody,” Parthibaraja told IANS.

The initials before Sneha’s name – MA – denote the first letter of her parents’ names.

From Vox, a quote about celebrities trying to trademark names:

The biggest celebrities started registering trademarks for their names around the same time publicity rights and likeness rights came into play, Clark says. One of the first pop stars to protect her name and likeness was Madonna in the 1980s, and one of the most influential trademark cases involving a celebrity name was the 1998 battle between Elvis Presley’s estate and a dive bar in Houston called The Velvet Elvis. (It is now called The Velvet Melvin.)

For more name-related quotes, check out the name quotes category.

The Top Baby Name Drops, 1881 to Today

top baby name drops by year

We looked at the top baby name rises last month, so this month let’s look at the opposite: the top drops. That is, the baby names that decreased the most in usage, percentage-wise, from one year to the next in the Social Security Administration’s data.

Here’s the format: girl names are on the left, boy names are on the right, and the percentages represent single-year slides in usage. (For example, from 1880 to 1881, usage of the girl name Clementine dropped 68% and usage of the boy name Neil dropped 76%.)

  • 1881: Clementine, -68%; Neil, -76%
  • 1882: Malissa, -56%; Verne, -67%
  • 1883: Minna, -67%; Morton, -74%
  • 1884: Roxy, -62%; Ellsworth & Newt, -60%
  • 1885: Sina, -68%; Clarance, -74%
  • 1886: Cordia, Dicie & Johnie, -64%; Adelbert, -69%
  • 1887: Faith, -69%; Hardy, -73%
  • 1888: Diana & Hope, -63%; Connie, -55%
  • 1889: Zilpha, -71%; Wendell, -71%
  • 1890: Buena, -60%; Alvie, -69%
  • 1891: Odie, -65%; Pierce, -76%
  • 1892: Eudora, -67%; Maude, -58%
  • 1893: Lollie, -65%; Levy, -64%
  • 1894: Macy, -64%; Lindsay, -76%
  • 1895: Gina, Laurel & Pennie, -69%; Alvie & Urban, -65%
  • 1896: Dagmar, -75%; Talmage, -67%
  • 1897: Myrta & Ouida, -75%; Benton, -68%
  • 1898: Fae, -71%; Fate, -74%
  • 1899: Rosia, -80%; Fitzhugh, -79%
  • 1900: Irva, -74%; Dora, -69%
  • 1901: Leonore, -75%; Judge, -81%
  • 1902: Veva, -74%; Davis, -72%
  • 1903: Littie & Samantha, -67%; Hunter, -67%
  • 1904: Genie, -71%; Bessie & Reynold, -67%
  • 1905: Luberta, -75%; Randall, -67%
  • 1906: Dulcie, -75%; Patsy, -69%
  • 1907: Libbie, -71%; Geo, -59%
  • 1908: Aurore, -75%; Elden & Minor, -67%
  • 1909: Arnetta, -68%; Tracy, -75%
  • 1910: Lollie, -67%; Hadley, -64%
  • 1911: Nada, -72%; Shelton, -73%
  • 1912: Carla, -71%; Rosendo, -67%
  • 1913: Vassie, -67%; Auburn, -67%
  • 1914: Coy & Maryelizabeth, -64%: Hosey, -78%
  • 1915: Thomasine, -67%; Giacomo, -67%
  • 1916: Zudora, -75%; Remus, -72%
  • 1917: Athalie, -78%; Tatsuo, -82%
  • 1918: Theta, -74%; Lennis, -72%
  • 1919: Liberty, -83%; Foch, -84%
  • 1920: Veatrice, -77%; Pershing, -73%
  • 1921: Fidela & Theone, -70%; Cleven, -71%
  • 1922: Angelyn & Renata, -75%; Dail, -73%
  • 1923: Odilia, -83%; Ugo & Waino, -74%
  • 1924: Gladine, -71%; Masayuki, -72%
  • 1925: Williemae, -72%; Emitt, -72%
  • 1926: Patrice, -75%; Ann, -78%
  • 1927: Vila, -75%; Boston, -76%
  • 1928: Kazue, -79%; Shoji, -93%
  • 1929: Livia, -81%; Tatsuo, -82%
  • 1930: Ivalee, -71%; Deforest, -72%
  • 1931: Emaline, -76%; Audley, -75%
  • 1932: Zulema, -80%; Hale, -77%
  • 1933: Dessa, -78%; Burleigh, -79%
  • 1934: Nira, -81%; Overton, -71%
  • 1935: Claudean, -73%; Hester, -74%
  • 1936: Norita, -79%; Kenley, -79%
  • 1937: Adel & Berdine, -71%; Grace, -78%

The SSA data isn’t perfect, but it does become more accurate in the late 1930s, because “many people born before 1937 never applied for a Social Security card, so their names are not included in our data” (SSA). Now, back to the list…

  • 1938: Ever, -75%; Casimiro, -75%
  • 1939: Walda, -74%; Butler, -74%
  • 1940: Avalon & Ellouise, -75%; Jacque, -71%
  • 1941: Lassie, -71%; Faye & Lemar, -71%
  • 1942: Voncille, -75%; Meyer, -70%
  • 1943: Mahala, -76%; Ewing, -76%
  • 1944: Kyle, -77%; Griffith, -77%
  • 1945: Sherrianne, -74%; Ellwood, Kern & Pascal, -67%
  • 1946: Bettyjo, -71%; Adrien, -77%
  • 1947: Judye, -76%; Bernardino, -72%
  • 1948: Tilda, -78%; Saverio, -74%
  • 1949: Vickii, -77%; Alphonza, -75%
  • 1950: Ranelle, -78%; Agapito, -68%
  • 1951: Vallorie, -90%; Skippy, -72%
  • 1952: Laural, -76%; Edson, -74%
  • 1953: Annelle & Otilia, -72%; Gerrit, -70%
  • 1954: Trenace, -81%; Celso, -76%
  • 1955: Jyl, -79%; Garrie & Robet, -74%
  • 1956: Cerise, -79%; Orlin, -74%
  • 1957: Angelene, -77%; Ruby, -76%
  • 1958: Seneca, -80%; Darryel & Richerd, -72%
  • 1959: Elfrida, -82%; Dietrich, -75%
  • 1960: Jinny, -72%; Ardis, -74%
  • 1961: Perian, -91%; Cully, -84%
  • 1962: Chantay, -80%; Torin, -73%
  • 1963: Marnita, -82%; Isidore, -75%
  • 1964: Julann, -79%; Tandy, -75%
  • 1965: Tonjua, -90%; Jaimie, -86%
  • 1966: Charlet & Desi, -77%; Glennon, -74%
  • 1967: Jeryl, -83%; Haskell, -72%
  • 1968: Millette, -88%; Daneil, -77%
  • 1969: Lya, -81%; Athony, -73%
  • 1970: Cinamon, -77%; Aldrin, -77%
  • 1971: Chimene, -77%; Garet, -74%
  • 1972: Jurea, -83%; Rayvon, -77%
  • 1973: Dayatra, -86%; Keelan, -70%
  • 1974: Shondell, -78%; Efraim, -71%
  • 1975: Natonya, -78%; Imari, -76%
  • 1976: Okema, -87%; Nakia, -79%
  • 1977: Liberty, -79%; Tierre, -81%
  • 1978: Farrah, -78%; Quint, -77%
  • 1979: Danetta, -77%; Kinte, -84%
  • 1980: Vernee, -77%; Kendra, -75%
  • 1981: Santresa, -80%; Jerritt, -74%
  • 1982: Andres, -75%; Stavros, -78%
  • 1983: Tremaine, -81%; Nicanor, -75%
  • 1984: Tyechia, -81%; Jeris, -77%
  • 1985: Gricel, -89%; Duron, -76%
  • 1986: Celenia, -83%; Damiano, -76%
  • 1987: Tareva, -86%; Krystal, -75%
  • 1988: Jeree, -82%; Jammal, -80%
  • 1989: Neyva, -77%; Derrel, -76%
  • 1990: Catherin, -93%; Salvator, -88%
  • 1991: Tichina, -80%; Arsenio, -76%
  • 1992: Unnamed, -88%; Unnamed, -86% [2nd place: Emilce & Symba, -83%; Quayshaun, -80%]
  • 1993: Akeiba, -88%; Evelyn & Jawara, -71%
  • 1994: Kebrina, -86%; Farrell, -79%
  • 1995: Noheli, -84%; Ajee, -79%
  • 1996: Shatasha, -81%; Unknown, -77%
  • 1997: Hydia, -80%, Halston, -79%
  • 1998: Ajaysia, -77%; Jachai, -91%
  • 1999: Naidelyn, -86%; Denzil, -79%
  • 2000: Shanequa, -82%; Giovan, -75%
  • 2001: Berania, -78%; Devontre, -75%
  • 2002: Anallely, -86%; Nkosi, -72%
  • 2003: Jnaya, -88%; Tyheim, -81%
  • 2004: Nayzeth, -89%; Myzel, -75%
  • 2005: Nathaniel, -80%; Hannah, -87%
  • 2006: Babygirl, -86%; Infant, -91% [Counting legit names only: Mikalah, -82%; Jakyri, -79%]
  • 2007: Bethzy, -91%; Brasen, -83%
  • 2008: Lizania, -86%; Duvan, -79%
  • 2009: Aideliz, -88%; Kesan, -78%
  • 2010: Chastelyn, -95%; Yanixan, -87%
  • 2011: Samuel, -79%; Tiger, -80%
  • 2012: Thaily, -78%; Vadhir, -88%
  • 2013: Shanik, -88%; Oneil, -77%
  • 2014: Audris & Avalie, -80%; Sy, -73%
  • 2015: Rion, -83%; Rawley, -79%
  • 2016: Yazaira, -84%; Treysen, -79%
  • 2017: Brucha, -76%; Makana, -79%
  • 2018: Yuleimy, -85%; Neizan, -78%

(Did you catch the doubles? Alvie, Tatsuo, and Fae/Faye.)

Top drops aren’t quite as exciting as top rises, but certain ones become much more intriguing when you notice that they were also top rises:

  • Rose-then-dropped: Clarance, Lollie, Lindsay, Zudora, Tatsuo, Liberty, Norita, Vallorie, Krystal, Seneca, Nakia, Mikalah, Bethzy, Thaily
  • Dropped-then-rose: Clementine, Malissa, Diana, Alvie, Pierce, Judge, Rosendo

I’ve already written about some of the names above (click the links to see the posts) and I plan to write about a few of the others. In the meanwhile, though, feel free to beat me to it — leave a comment and let us know why you think any of these names saw dropped in usage when they did.

Name Quotes #69: Larry, Darryl, Darryl

larry, darryl, darryl, newhart, names

From the ’80s TV show Newhart:

“I’m Larry, this is my brother Darryl, and this is my other brother Darryl.”

From a 1936 newspaper article about movie actress Veda Ann Borg:

Miss Borg was given a new tag almost the minute she stepped into the studio. It was “Ann Noble.” […] Miss Borg contended that her own name is more descriptive of her personality than Ann Noble. The former model’s argument was convincing. She will be billed as Veda Ann Borg.

(Keavy, Hubbard. “Screen Life In Hollywood.” Wilkes-Barre Record 23 Apr. 1936: 19.)

From an Atlas Obscura article about Australian nicknaming conventions:

How in the world did we get from “Jeremy” to “Jezza”?

There is a rule for how this works. Names which have the letter R in them–Jeremy, Catherine, Sharon, Barry, Murray–are trouble for speakers of non-rhotic variations of English to abbreviate. Rhoticity is a linguistic term for describing when the letter is pronounced; in non-rhotic dialects of English, the sound will be discarded unless followed immediately by a vowel. The dialects of England, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and, well, New England are all non-rhotic, which is why the word “car” sounds like “cah.”

This isn’t a problem in any of those names if they’re pronounced fully; there’s always a vowel after the R. But to truncate them would be difficult. Typically hypocoristic nicknames are formed by cutting everything but the first syllable and then either leaving that as-is or adding a vowel. That’s how “Daniel” becomes “Danno”: clip to the first syllable (“Dan”) and add a vowel. (The -o ending is most common for male names; -ie is more common for female names.)

From a press release about a newly discovered prehistoric shark:

The team, led by North Carolina State University’s Terry Gates, named the shark Galagadon nordquistae, a nod to its teeth, which have a stepped triangle shape like the spaceships in the 1980s video game Galaga, and to Karen Nordquist, the Field Museum volunteer who discovered the fossils.

From a 1976 article in People about pianist Lorin Hollander and his then-wife Cali:

Lorin now often finds himself babysitting while Cali campaigns against atomic power. Symbolically, not long ago she shed the name she’d “hated for 30 years” for one that sounded right. Margo became Cali. “I look at myself differently now,” she says firmly, “except people all across the country think Lorin has remarried.”

From a WPMU DEV blog post about the Wayback Machine digital archive:

The Wayback Machine was named to reference Mr. Peabody’s WABAC machine from the popular cartoon Rocky and Bullwinkle. In the show, the machine was pronounced as “way back,” which is where the index got its name.

From a BBC article about unpopular baby names in the UK:

The name Clive was 44th most popular choice for boys in 1954 but dropped to 58th place in 1964, and has not been in the top 100 since.

Clive Tricker, 70, from Kesgrave in Suffolk, said the cultural references associated with his name were no longer current.

[…]

“I don’t really mind too much if it dies out because the less of us there are the more unique we are.

(Tricker specified that he was named after Clive of India because his grandfather had been stationed in India while he was in the Army.)

From a Mental Floss article about Ron Howard:

However, Howard did go out of his way to confirm one long-held belief about Willow: that two of the villains were named after famous film critics. The evil General Kael was named after the notoriously ruthless Pauline Kael and the two-headed monster Eborsisk was named after the iconic At the Movies duo of Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert.

And, finally, a pair of snippets from a Colorado Public Radio article about Denver street names. First:

William McGaa [one of Denver’s founding officials] had a debaucherous reputation of his own, drinking and adulterating his way out of favor with the city’s elite. McGaa even named Wazee and Wewatta streets after two of his many wives, both Native American woman from local tribes.

(The settlement of Denver was named in late 1858. McGaa’s son, William Denver McGaa, was born in the settlement in March of 1859 and named after it. His mother was neither Wazee nor Wewatta, but a half-Native American woman named Jennie.)

Second, regarding Denver’s “double alphabetical” streets, which were renamed in 1904:

The pattern is a proper noun name, ideally British, followed by the name of a tree or plant. Albion and Ash, Bellaire and Birch, Clermont and Cherry.

The switch wasn’t without resistance from those wealthy neighborhoods. When Eudora Avenue became Fir Street, residents decried the name as “too plebeian.”

Want to see more blog posts like this one? Check out the name quotes category.

Names Popular During the Victorian Era

Tuesday’s post about the Victorian-style Tylney Hall Hotel reminded me of a list of Victorian-era names that I’ve had bookmarked forever.

The list was created by amateur genealogist G. M. Atwater as a resource for writers. It contains names and name combinations that were commonly seen in the U.S. from the 1840s to the 1890s. Below is the full list (with a few minor changes).

Victorian Era Female Names Victorian Era Male Names
  • Abigale / Abby
  • Ada
  • Adella
  • Agnes
  • Allie
  • Almira / Almyra
  • Alva
  • America
  • Amelia
  • Ann / Annie
  • Arrah
  • Beatrice
  • Bernice
  • Charity
  • Charlotte
  • Chastity
  • Claire
  • Constance
  • Cynthia
  • Dorothy / Dot
  • Edith
  • Edna
  • Edwina
  • Ella
  • Eleanor
  • Ellie
  • Elizabeth / Eliza / Liza / Lizzy / Bess / Bessie / Beth / Betsy
  • Elvira
  • Emma
  • Esther
  • Ethel
  • Eudora
  • Eva
  • Fidelia
  • Frances / Fanny
  • Flora
  • Florence
  • Geneve
  • Genevieve
  • Georgia
  • Gertrude / Gertie
  • Gladys
  • Grace
  • Hannah
  • Hattie
  • Helen
  • Helene
  • Henrietta / Hettie / Ettie
  • Hester
  • Hope
  • Hortence
  • Isabell / Isabella
  • Jane
  • Jennie
  • Jessamine
  • Josephine
  • Judith
  • Julia
  • Juliet
  • Katherine / Kate
  • Laura
  • Leah
  • Lenora
  • Letitia
  • Lila
  • Lilly
  • Lorena
  • Lorraine
  • Lottie
  • Louise / Louisa
  • Lucy
  • Lulu
  • Lydia
  • Mahulda
  • Margaret / Peggie
  • Mary / Molly / Polly
  • Mary Elizabeth
  • Mary Frances
  • Martha
  • Matilda / Mattie
  • Maude
  • Maxine / Maxie
  • Mercy
  • Mildred
  • Minerva
  • Missouri
  • Myrtle
  • Nancy
  • Natalie
  • Nellie / Nelly
  • Nettie
  • Nora
  • Orpha
  • Patsy
  • Parthena
  • Permelia
  • Phoebe
  • Philomena
  • Preshea
  • Rachel
  • Rebecca / Becky
  • Rhoda / Rhody
  • Rowena
  • Rufina
  • Ruth
  • Samantha
  • Sally
  • Sarah
  • Sarah Ann
  • Sarah Elizabeth
  • Savannah
  • Selina
  • Sophronia
  • Stella
  • Theodosia / Theda
  • Vertiline / Verd
  • Victoria
  • Virginia / Ginny
  • Vivian
  • Winnifred / Winnie
  • Zona
  • Zylphia
  • Aaron
  • Abraham / Abe
  • Alan / Allen
  • Albert
  • Alexander
  • Alonzo
  • Ambrose
  • Amon
  • Amos
  • Andrew / Drew / Andy
  • Aquilla
  • Archibald / Archie
  • Arnold
  • Asa
  • August / Augustus / Gus
  • Barnabas / Barney
  • Bartholomew / Bart
  • Benjamin
  • Bennet
  • Benedict
  • Bernard
  • Bertram / Bert
  • Buford
  • Byron
  • Calvin
  • Cephas
  • Charles / Charley / Charlie
  • Christopher
  • Christopher Columbus
  • Clarence
  • Clement / Clem
  • Clinton / Clint
  • Cole
  • Columbus / Lom / Lum
  • Commodore Perry
  • Daniel / Dan
  • David
  • Edmund
  • Edward / Ned
  • Edwin
  • Eldon
  • Eli
  • Elijah
  • Elisha
  • Emmett
  • Enoch
  • Ezekiel / Zeke
  • Ezra
  • Francis / Frank
  • Franklin
  • Frederick / Fred
  • Gabriel / Gabe
  • Garrett
  • George
  • George Washington
  • Gideon
  • Gilbert / Gil
  • Granville
  • Harland
  • Harrison
  • Harold / Harry
  • Harvey
  • Henry / Hank
  • Hiram
  • Horace
  • Horatio
  • Hugh
  • Isaiah
  • Israel
  • Isaac / Ike
  • Isaac Newton
  • Jacob / Jake
  • James / Jim
  • Jasper
  • Jefferson / Jeff
  • Jedediah / Jed
  • Jeptha
  • Jesse
  • Joel
  • John / Jack
  • John Paul
  • John Wesley
  • Jonathan
  • Joseph / Josephus
  • Josiah
  • Joshua
  • Julian
  • Julius
  • Lafayette / Lafe
  • Lawrence / Larry
  • Leander
  • Les / Lester / Leslie
  • Lewis / Lew / Louis
  • Levi
  • Lucas
  • Lucian
  • Lucius
  • Luke
  • Luther
  • Louis
  • Levi
  • Lucas
  • Lucian
  • Lucius
  • Luke
  • Luther
  • Matthew
  • Marcellus
  • Mark
  • Martin
  • Martin Luther
  • Masheck
  • Maurice
  • Maxwell
  • Merrill
  • Meriwether
  • Meriwether Lewis
  • Michael / Mike
  • Micajah / Cage
  • Mordecai
  • Morgan
  • Morris
  • Nathaniel / Nathan / Nate / Nat
  • Newton / Newt
  • Nicholas / Nick
  • Nimrod
  • Ninian
  • Obediah
  • Octavius
  • Ora / Oral
  • Orville
  • Oscar
  • Owen
  • Paul
  • Patrick / Pat
  • Patrick Henry
  • Paul
  • Perry
  • Peter
  • Pleasant
  • Ralph
  • Raymond
  • Reuben
  • Robert / Bob
  • Robert Lee
  • Richard / Rich / Dick
  • Roderick
  • Rudolph
  • Rufus
  • Samuel
  • Sam Houston
  • Seth
  • Silas
  • Simon
  • Simeon
  • Stanley / Stan
  • Stephen
  • Thaddeus
  • Thomas / Tom
  • Thomas Jefferson
  • Theodore / Ted
  • Timothy / Tim
  • Ulysses
  • Uriah
  • Victor
  • Walter
  • Warren
  • Washington
  • Wilfred
  • William / Will / Bill / Billy
  • Willie
  • Zachariah
  • Zebulon
  • Zedock

Which female name and male name do you like best?

Source: Victorian Era Names, A Writer’s Guide