How popular is the baby name Eustacia in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Eustacia and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Eustacia.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Eustacia

Number of Babies Named Eustacia

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Eustacia

A Rose by Any Other Name – Burnaby, Natali, Zelda Lloyd

Sure, a rose by just any other name would not smell as sweet. But what if the name were as cool as “Madame Azélie Imbert” or “Victor Emmanuel”?

Other intriguing rose names I found in the database include:

Abraham Darby
Admired Miranda
Betty Uprichard
Clementina Carbonieri
Cyril Fletcher
Dagmar Spath
Dainty Bess
Edna Marie
Fiona’s Affection
Fraulein Octavia Hesse
Gentle Hermione
Ghislaine de Feligonde
Hawaiian Queen Martha
Henry Bennett
Ida Belle
Imperatrice Eugenie
Jan and Rick
Kaitlyn Ainsley
Konigin Beatrix
Lady Duncan
Mrs Erskine Pembroke Thom
Noble Antony
Oskar Cordell
Our Terry
Phyllis Bide
Proud Titiana
Queen Margrethe
Rex Anderson
Sharifa Asma
Smokey Joe
Tara Allison
Uncle Walter
Uwe Seeler
Victoria’s Song
Whisper Louise
Wise Portia
Xavier Olibo
Yolande d’Aragon
Young Quinn
Zelda Lloyd
Zephirine Drouhin

If you’re anything like me, you’re probably now wondering: So how can I name a cultivar of my very own?

Well, just grab your credit card and get in touch with a company that hybridizes roses. Some charge as little as several thousand dollars; others ask for as much as $75,000 to name a rose.

If you don’t have that kind of money lying around, and you happen to live in British Columbia, you may be able to name a rose for free. Just submit a name to the GardenWise Name a Rose contest before the end of August.

“Good” Greek Names – Eugenia, Eunice, Euphemia, Eusebia

Most parents I know think Eu-names are, well, ewww.

That’s too bad. I can see why Eu-names might not have the appeal of names like Jayden and Ashley, but they’re still great names–especially if you’re searching for something unusual but still legitimate (i.e. not a modern creation).

The prefix means “well; good; easy” and is featured in Greek names such as the ones below. (I stuck to feminine versions just to keep things consistent.)

Euangelia good news
Eudoxia good fame
Eugenia well-born
Eulalia good talk
Eunice good victory
Eunomia good order
Euodia good odor
Euphemia good speech
Euphrasia good cheer
Euphronia good state of mind
Eupraxia good practice
Eusebia good reverence
Eustacia good harvest
Eustathia well-built
Eustorgia good family-love
Euthalia good bloom
Euthymia good mood
Eutropia good bend
Eutychia good fortune

English-speakers tend to pronounce that first syllable “yoo,” but I’m pretty sure the Greeks articulated each vowel in the diphthong separately. Maybe English-speakers would find Eu-names more intriguing if we returned to that original “eh-oo” pronunciation? Hm…