How popular is the baby name Euterpe in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Euterpe.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Euterpe


Posts that Mention the Name Euterpe

Babies Named for Sailing Ships (E)

The SS Earl Dalhausie

The people below were born aboard — and named after! — ships with E-names…

  • Earl Dalhousie:
    • Lydia Dalhousie Woodhard, born in 1873
    • Sydney Dalhousie Smith, born in 1873
    • Ellen Dalhousie Gare, born in 1874
    • Selina Dalhousie Baker, born in 1875
    • Emily Dalhousie Hunter, born in 1875
    • Francis Louisa Dalhousie Reed, born in 1878
    • Percy Dalhousie Wiltshire, born in 1878
    • Matilda Dalhousie Cormie, born in 1879
  • Earl Derby:
    • William Earl Derby Rimmington, born in 1879
  • Earl Granville:
    • Granville Campbell Speed, born in 1879
    • William John Granville Cathrope, born in 1880
    • Granville Williams, born in 1881
    • John Granville Tymms, born in 1883
    • John Granville Richards, born in 1883
    • John Granville Flint, born in 1883
  • Earl of Zetland:
    • Helen Zetland Clark, born in 1875
    • John Whiting Zetland Hamilton, born in 1875
  • Earl Percy:
    • Florence Percy Jarrold, born in 1876
  • Edinburgh:
    • Elizabeth Edinburgh Cockayne, born in 1875
    • Edith Edinburgh Marriott, born in 1875
  • Edward Oliver:
    • Edward Neptune White, born in 1858
  • Elderslie:
    • Josephine Elderslie McGrath, born in 1887
  • Ellen Stuart:
    • John Calvert Stuart Defries, born in 1870
  • Elliot:
    • James Lyle Elliot Mackay, born in 1879
  • Ellora:
    • Mary Ellora McEwan, born in 1879
    • Ellora Mary Little, born in 1883
  • Elysia:
    • Catello Elisio Martingano, born in 1886
  • Erin:
    • Erine Andersen, born in 1881
  • Essex:
    • John Essex McQueen, born in 1863
    • Charlotte Essex Mead, born in 1863
    • Henry Essex Hamilton, born in 1863
    • Helen Essex Percy, born in 1863
    • Sarah Essex Mulholland, born in 1869
    • Wilhelmina Essex, born in 1870
    • Alfred Essex Jackson, born in 1874
  • Ethiopia:
    • Ethiopia M. Prokop, born in 1880
    • Ethiopia Murray Drabeck, born in 1883
  • Etna:
    • Margaret Etna Hugg, born in 1865
  • Euterpe:
    • Minnie McGahey Euterpe Pearson, born in 1874
    • Selina Euterpe Robinson, born in 1874

Do you think any of the ship names above work particularly well as human names?

Source: FamilySearch.org

Prytania – Possible Baby Name?

My husband and I found ourselves in New Orleans again recently, but only for a matter of hours, so we weren’t able to have as many adventures as last time. While taking a Lyft through an uptown area of the city, though, I did spot an intriguing street name: Prytania.

Had any NOLA residents ever been named Prytania? I did some research, but couldn’t find any. In fact, the only Prytania I managed to track down was a 12-year-old Texas girl named Prytania Chambers on the 1880 U.S. Census:

Prytania isn’t even as common as Atchafalaya!

The street itself has an interesting name-story, though.

Not long after the sale of New Orleans to the United States in 1803 — part of the massive Louisiana Purchase* — some residents of the city devised an ambitious plan to construct a Roman-style collesée (colisseum) that would host public games and assemblies. It was never built, but the name lives in “Coliseum Street” and ” Coliseum Square.”

Similarly, these residents also wanted to establish a prytanée — a sort of people’s university — based on like-named schools in France. The French schools had been named after the ancient Greek prytaneum, or town hall. The university was going to be located on what was originally called the Rue des Prytanées. But, like the coliseum, the school was never built, and the street name eventually evoled to become “Prytania.”

The first syllable of prytaneum is based on the ancient Greek word pur, meaning “fire.” Ancient Greek prytaneums were dedicated to Hestia, goddess of the hearth, and within each one a perpetual fire was kept burning.

Coliseum and Prytania Streets run parallel to one another, and, in the area where the collesée and the prytanée were going to be built, the cross streets are named after the nine Greek muses: Urania, Thalia, Euterpe, Calliope, Clio, Erato, Melpomene, Terpsichore, and Polyhymnia. (Here’s a WGNO video about the pronunciations of several of these muse/road names.)

What are your thoughts on “Prytania” as a potential baby name? Usable?

Sources:

*Also a baby name! Here’s more about Louisiana Purchase O’Leary.