How popular is the baby name Fatimah in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Fatimah.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Fatimah


Posts that Mention the Name Fatimah

9 More Virus-Inspired Baby Names

We’ve already talked about a bunch of virus-inspired names (Covid, Covid, Covid, Covid, Covid, Coviduvidapdap, Corona, Corona, Lockdown, Sanitizer), but there are still more! Here’s a round-up of ones that I’ve seen, but haven’t blogged about yet…

Corona and Corona (India): A baby girl born on March 29 was named Corona Kumari, and a baby boy born on April 5 (at the same hospital) was named Corona Kumar. The names weren’t a coincidence: They were suggested by Dr. S. F. Basha, who treated both mothers.

Corona (Indonesia): A baby girl born on April 30 was named Nara Fatimah Corona.

Covid (Philippines): A baby girl born on April 13 was named Covid Marie.

Lockdown (India): A baby boy born on May 22 — aboard a Shramik Special [train], which is very interesting — was named Lockdown.

Lockdown (India): A baby boy born in April was named Lockdown. His father Sanjay said, “We went through so much trouble due to coronavirus outbreak and lockdown. He was born in the midst of such peril. So, we have decided to name him Lockdown.”

Quarantine and Sanitizer (India): A set of male twins born in May were named Quarantine and Sanitizer. Their father Dharmendra said, “Both give us protection. So, this feeling of security should remain lifelong. These are the best names that we could [find] for our children.”

Quarantino (India): A baby boy born on May 31 was named Emmanuel Quarantino. The parents had traveled from Goa to Manipur several days earlier, so they’d been placed under institutional quarantine at an isolation center called Emmanuel School. This was where the baby was born, hence the name.

(Quarantino has to be my favorite virus-name so far. It keeps making me think of Quentin Tarantino.)

Have you spotted any other names like these in the news? If so, please leave a comment!

Sources: Meet Emmanuel Quarantino, A Manipuri Baby Boy Who Was Born In A Quarantine Centre, Manipur: Woman gives birth to baby boy at COVID-19 quarantine centre, names him Emmanuel Quarantino, ‘Lockdown Yadav to Sanitiser Singh’: Indian parents and their tryst with Covid names, Meerut couple names their newborn twins ‘Quarantine’ and ‘Sanitizer’, Corona Kumar and Kumari: 2 Andhra Pradesh couples name newborn babies born during lockdown, Corona Kumar, then Covid Marie, the newborns being named after a pandemic, ‘Corona’ baby: Newborn girl in West Java named after pandemic

Catholic Names to Watch – Teresa and Fatima

children of fatima, lucia, francisco, jacinta, 1917

The baby names Teresa and Fatima might see higher usage in 2016 and 2017, respectively, thanks to Catholic influence.

Teresa

On September 4, 2016, Mother Teresa will officially be declared a saint of the Catholic Church.

Mother Teresa’s religious name honors St. Thérèse de Lisieux, but she opted for the Spanish spelling “Teresa” when she took her religious vows (back in 1931) because another nun in the convent was already using the name “Thérèse.”

Her birth name was Anjezë, an Albanian form of Agnes, which can be traced back to the ancient Greek word hagnos, meaning “pure, chaste.”

Fatima

Next year marks the 100th anniversary of the Marian apparitions seen by three shepherd children (Lúcia, Francisco, and Jacinta) near the town of Fátima, Portugal.

The place name Fátima is based on the Arabic personal name Fatimah, meaning “to wean.”

If the usage of Fatima does rise in the U.S. in 2017, I’ll be curious to see how much of that increase comes from states with large Portuguese populations (like Massachusetts, California, and Rhode Island).

Which of the two do you prefer?

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Update, 5/18/2017: The name Teresa did rise in usage, but only slightly, in 2016.

Name News from Saudi Arabia

Three bits of name news out of Saudi Arabia…

First:

The most circulated [baby] names in the Kingdom include Mohammad, Fahd, Abdullah, Abdulrahman, Turki, Bandar, Omar, Ali, Fatima, Aisha, Nora, Hessa, Sheikha, and Maha.

Unfortunately the article didn’t specify exactly which year (or years) this list covers.

Second:

Unusual or rare [baby] names have been reduced due to the work of authorities across the Kingdom who have enacted regulations to curb exotic or strange names.

Some of the baby names no longer being used are…

  • Faziah, female name meaning “one who is afraid”
  • Mureibah, female name, “fearful”
  • Najar, male name
  • Rashash, male name, “a gun machine”
  • Zaqam, male name meaning “to do with the mouth” (…?)

Here’s an earlier list of baby names (possibly) banned in Saudi Arabia.

Third:

Saudi society is facing a new phenomenon in which many young people are changing their names to be in tune with the latest name trends, Al-Hayat newspaper reported.

Several of the name changes mentioned in the article:

  • Fatimah to Hadeel (woman, 22 years old)
    • “I used the name Hadeel for my social media account before I changed it officially with the Civil Status Department.”
  • Salem to Faris (man, 27 years old)
  • Ethar to Maria (woman, 31 years old)
  • Nouf to Naifah (woman, age not mentioned)

Sources: Naming babies under scrutiny, The name game! Young Saudis changing names to be more trendy