How popular is the baby name Florian in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Florian and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Florian.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Florian

Number of Babies Named Florian

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Florian

What Would You Name the Two Frenchmen?

The image below, of the Boulevard du Temple in Paris, was captured in early 1838 by Louis Daguerre, inventor of the daguerreotype.

It may be the earliest surviving photograph of a person. Two people, actually. Both are in the lower left:

Daguerreotype: Boulevard du Temple

Here’s a close-up:

Boulevard du Temple, detail

The standing man is getting his shoe shined, and the other man (partially obscured) is doing the shoe-shining.

Of all the people on the sidewalk that day, these were the only two to stay still long enough (about 10 minutes) to be captured in the image.

Now for the fun part!

What would you name these two Frenchmen?

Let’s pretend you’re writing a book set in Paris in the 1830s, and these are two of your characters. What names would you give them?

Here’s a long list of traditional French male names, to get you started:

Abel
Absolon
Achille
Adam
Adolphe
Adrien
Aimé
Alain
Alban
Albert
Alexandre
Alfred
Alphonse
Amaury
Amroise
Amédée
Anatole
André
Anselme
Antoine
Antonin
Apollinaire
Ariel
Aristide
Armand
Arnaud
Arsène
Arthur
Aubert
Aubin
Auguste
Augustin
Aurèle
Aurélien
Baptiste
Barnabé
Barthélémy
Basile
Bastien
Benjamin
Benoit
Bernard
Bertrand
Blaise
Boniface
Bruno
Calixte
Camille
Céleste
Célestin
Césaire
César
Charles
Christian
Christophe
Clair
Claude
Clément
Clovis
Constant
Constantin
Corentin
Corin
Corneille
Cosme
Cyril
Damien
Daniel
David
Denis
Déodat
Désiré
Didier
Dieudonné
Dimitri
Diodore
Dominique
Donat
Donatien
Edgar
Edgard
Edmé
Edmond
Édouard
Élie
Eloi
Émeric
Émile
Émilien
Emmanuel
Enzo
Éric
Ermenegilde
Ernest
Ethan
Étienne
Eugène
Eustache
Évariste
Évrard
Fabien
Fabrice
Félicien
Félix
Ferdinand
Fernand
Fiacre
Firmin
Florence
Florent
Florentin
Florian
Francis
François
Frédéric
Gabriel
Gaël
Gaëtan
Gaspard
Gaston
Gaubert
Geoffroy
Georges
Gérard
Géraud
Germain
Gervais
Ghislain
Gilbert
Gilles
Gratien
Grégoire
Guatier
Guillaume
Gustave
Guy
Hector
Henri
Herbert
Hercule
Hervé
Hilaire
Hippolyte
Honoré
Horace
Hubert
Hugues
Humbert
Hyacinthe
Ignace
Irénée
Isidore
Jacques
Jason
Jean
Jérémie
Jérôme
Joachim
Jocelyn
Joël
Jonathan
Joseph
Josse
Josué
Jourdain
Jules
Julien
Juste
Justin
Laurent
Laurentin
Lazare
Léandre
Léo
Léon
Léonard
Léonce
Léonide
Léopold
Lionel
Loïc
Lothaire
Louis
Loup
Luc
Lucas
Lucien
Lucrèce
Ludovic
Maël
Marc
Marcel
Marcellin
Marin
Marius
Martin
Mathieu
Mathis
Matthias
Maurice
Maxence
Maxime
Maximilien
Michaël
Michel
Modeste
Narcisse
Nathan
Nathanaël
Nazaire
Nicéphore
Nicodème
Nicolas
Noé
Noël
Norbert
Odilon
Olivier
Onésime
Pascal
Patrice
Paul
Philippe
Pierre
Placide
Pons
Prosper
Quentin
Rainier
Raoul
Raphaël
Raymond
Régis
Rémy
René
Reynaud
Richard
Robert
Roch
Rodolphe
Rodrigue
Roger
Roland
Romain
Rosaire
Ruben
Salomon
Samuel
Sébastien
Séraphin
Serge
Sévère
Séverin
Simon
Sylvain
Sylvestre
Télesphore
Théodore
Théophile
Thibault
Thierry
Thomas
Timothée
Toussaint
Urbain
Valentin
Valère
Valéry
Vespasien
Victor
Vincent
Vivien
Xavier
Yves
Zacharie

For some real-life inspiration, here are lists of famous 19th century and 20th century French people, courtesy of Wikipedia. Notice that many of the Frenchman have double-barreled, triple-barreled, even quadruple-barreled given names. (Daguerre himself was named Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre.)

Source: The First Photograph of a Human


Celebrity Baby Name – Cyrus Michael Christopher

Actress Claire Danes and her husband Hugh Dancy recently welcomed their first child, a baby boy named Cyrus Michael Christopher Dancy.

Most of the articles/blog posts I’ve read have called the name Cyrus “unusual.”

I suppose it is, numbers-wise. Cyrus has never been a very common name in the U.S., though it’s become more popular in the last decade.

But by celebrity baby name standards? Not so much. Cyrus is vintage-unusual, not bizarre-unusual. More like Enoch, Harmon, Otto, Florian and Lambert than like Sparrow, Jermasjesty, Moroccan, Nakoa-Wolf and Bronx.

In terms of etymology, Cyrus can be traced back to Kyros, the Greek form of the Old Persian name Kurus or Kurush, of unknown etymology.

How do you feel about the name Cyrus? (Is it possible for you to put aside the Miley Cyrus association?)

Car Names as Baby Names

car names as baby names

Love cars? Here are some car-related names that have been used as baby names:

  • Allante, from Cadillac Allante.
  • Aston, from Aston Martin. Inspired by Aston Hill in England.
  • Audi, German manufacturer. The name is a Latin translation of Horch, surname of founder August Horch.
  • Avanti, from Studebaker Avanti. The word avanti means “forward” in Italian.
  • Bentley, British manufacturer. Named after founder W. O. Bentley.
  • Camry, from Toyota Camry. The name is based on kanmuri, which means “crown” in Japanese.
  • Caprice, from Chevrolet Caprice. Named after a New York City restaurant.
  • Catera, from Cadillac Catera.
  • Celica, from Toyota Celica. The name is based on caelica, which means “celestial” in Latin.
  • Chevelle, from Chevrolet Chevelle.
  • Chevy, nickname for Chevrolet.
  • Civic, from Honda Civic.
  • Cooper, from MINI Cooper. Named after auto racer John Cooper.
  • Cressida, from Toyota Cressida.
  • DeLorean, from DeLorean DMC-12.
  • Diamante, from Mitsubishi Diamante.
  • Dino, from Fiat Dino or Ferrari Dino. Both named after V6 engine designer Alfredo “Dino” Ferrari.
  • Dodge, a division of Chrysler. (I know of two babies named after Dodge Pickup Trucks specifically.)
  • Elantra, from Hyundai Elantra.
  • Elise, from Lotus Elise. Named after Elisa Artioli, granddaughter of Italian entrepreneur Romano Artioli.
  • Elva, British manufacturer. The name is based on elle va, which means “she goes” in French.
  • Florian, from Isuzu Florian. Named after the fictional horse in Florian, the Emperor’s Stallion by Felix Salten.
  • Ford, American manufacturer. Named after founder Henry Ford.
  • Hudson, American manufacturer.
  • Jazz, from Honda Jazz.
  • Jeep, a division of Chrysler.
  • Jetta, from Volkswagen Jetta. The name is based on the phrase “jet stream.”
  • Jimmy, from GMC Jimmy.
  • Kia, South Korean manufacturer.
  • Lexus, a division of Toyota. The name has no specific meaning, according to the company.
  • Lincoln, a division of Ford. Named after former U.S. president Abraham Lincoln.
  • Martin, from Aston Martin. Named after founder Lionel Martin.
  • Mercedes, from Mercedes-Benz, a division of Daimler AG. Named after Mercedes Jellinek, daughter of Austrian entrepreneur Emil Jellinek.
  • Miata, from Mazda Miata. Possibly means “reward” in Old High German.
  • Millenia, from Mazda Millenia.
  • Mondeo, from Ford Mondeo. The name is based on mundus, which means “world” in Latin.
  • Morgan, British manufacturer.
  • Porsche, German manufacturer. Named after founder Ferdinand Porsche.
  • Royce, from Rolls-Royce. Named after founder Henry Royce.
  • Scion, a Toyota marque.
  • Shelby, from Shelby American. Named for founder Carroll Hall Shelby.
  • Tiburon, from Hyundai Tiburon. The word tiburón means “shark” in Spanish.
  • Toyota, Japanese manufacturer. Named for founder Kiichiro Toyoda.
  • VW, short for Volkswagen.

Blog readers have also told me about babies named Riviera (after the Buick Riviera) and Axel (because of its similarity to the word axle).

Know any babies that were named for automobiles?

[Psst! Were you looking for a post about giving a name to your car?]

Dido’s Take on Her Two Unusual First Names

You may not be surprised to learn that UK-based singer Dido wasn’t born Dido. After all, Bono wasn’t born Bono. Moby wasn’t born Moby. Plenty of entertainers have stage names, right?

But Dido’s name isn’t a stage name. She was actually called Dido throughout childhood. And she wasn’t too happy about it. “I thought it was cruel to call me Dido and then expect me to just deal with it,” she told The Guardian back in 2001.

According to Dido’s birth certificate, her real first name is Florian–a name she also dislikes. “Florian is a German man’s name. That’s just mean.”

How did Dido feel about growing up with two first names?

To be called one thing and christened another is actually very confusing and annoying. It’s one of the most irritating things that my parents did to me. I’m still irritated by it.

As an adult, she put an end to the confusion by making Dido her legal first name.

Source: How Dido did it

Baby Name Needed – Latin or Italian Name for Baby #1

A reader named Claudia is expecting her first baby (gender unknown). She’s looking for a Latin or Italian baby name.

She mentions that her middle name is Elisabetta, the baby’s father is named Simon Edmond, and the baby’s surname will be a 2-syllable D-name similar to Downie.

Here are some names that I think might work:

Adriana
Antonia
Augusta
Aurelia
Camilla
Clementina
Cecilia
Daria
Emilia
Eugenia
Fabia/Fabiana/Fabiola
Felicia
Frances/Francesca
Flora/Floriana
Julia
Isidora
Laura
Livia/Liviana
Lorenza
Lucia/Luciana
Marcella
Marina
Martina
Nunzia
Octavia/Ottavia
Paula/Paola
Philippa/Filippa
Piera/Pietra
Renata
Romana
Sabina
Sebastiana
Silvia/Silvana
Valentina
Victoria/Vittoria
Vincenza
Adrian
Antonio/Antony
Augusto
Aurelio
Camillo
Clemente
Cecil
Dario
Emilio/Emil
Eugene/Eugenio
Fabian/Fabiano
Felix
Francis/Francesco
Florian/Floriano
Julius/Julian
Isidore/Isidoro
Lauro
Livio
Lorenzo/Laurence
Lucian/Luciano
Marcello
Marino
Martin/Martino
Nunzio
Octavian/Ottavio
Paul/Paolo
Philip/Filippo
Piero/Pietro
Renato
Roman/Romano
Sabino
Sebastian/Sebastiano
Silvio/Silvano
Valentino/Valentine
Victor/Vittorio
Vincent/Vincenzo

Which of the above do you like best?

What other Latin and Italian names would you suggest to Claudia?

Phone Book Fishing in Wyoming – Brownie, Mrityunjal, Scholastique, Ubaldo

I just went through a fairly recent copy of the Laramie, Wyoming phone book. (Yes, I went through the whole thing — it’s only about 60 pages long.) Here are some of the names I came across.

A: Altamae, Amarante, Anet, Ania, Azize
B: Borgia, Bowdoin, Braeton, Brownie, Brunza, Bunny, Burkett
C: Cambria, Capri, Carlinda, Celestin, Changyul, Chavawn, Chimpalthradi, Clynn, Crecencio
D: Desharia, Dolphus, Dorea, Dubie
E: Eino, Eloy, Enja, Erambo Ayokosok, Erasmo, Eustorgio
F: Farkas, Floraida, Florian, Foncey
G: Gamal, Gavino, Guoying
H: Hakima, Halcyon, Hartzell, Heikki, Hyoen
I: Ineta
J: Jayaramreddy, Jeniel, Jenise, Jonlee
K: Kaijsa, Koren, Kurk, Kusum
L: Latazia, Lay-Nah, Linse
M: Maciej, Maimo, Manmohan, Mannory, Marinus, Maryalice, Masahiro, Mikkelina, Mima, Minden, Mrityunjal, Murat, Mustapha, Mylon, Myrcena
N: N’Kole, Navamoney, Neulette, Ninnie
O: Octaviano, Odean, Oundalyn
P: Petter, Pinky
Q: Quee-Young, Quita
R: Rabinder, Reinette, Ridge, Rogene, Royal
S: Sadrul, Scholastique, Servando, Shealeen, Sneh, Snehalata, Star, Storm, Sukky, Suresh
T: Terena, Tibereu, Towana, Trice, Tylin
U: Ubaldo, Ushakant, Uvalda
V: Vidal, Vinita, Vipul, Vladimir
W: Wangtii, Warrie, West, Windy
Y: Yujie, Yujung
Z: Zoltan, Zondra

I’ve also found other cool names in phone books from Indiana, Illinois, and Indiana again.