How popular is the baby name Frances in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Frances and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Frances.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Frances

Number of Babies Named Frances

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Frances

Old-Fashioned Double Names: Loladean, Ivylee, Effielou

old-fashioned double names

A few weeks ago, I got an email from a reader looking for lists of old-fashioned double names. She was aiming for names like Thelma Dean, Eula Mae, and Gaynell — names that would have sounded trendy in the early 1900s. She also mentioned that she’d started a list of her own.

So I began scouring the interwebs. I tracked down lists of old-fashioned names, and lists of double names…but I couldn’t find a decent list of double names that were also old-fashioned.

I loved the idea of such a list, though, so I suggested that we work together to create one. She generously sent me the pairings she’d collected so far, and I used several different records databases to find many more.

I restricted my search to names given to girls born in the U.S. from 1890 to 1930. I also stuck to double names that I found written as single names, because it’s very likely that these pairings were used together in real life (i.e., that they were true double names and not merely first-middle pairings).

Pairings that seemed too timeless, like Maria Mae and Julia Rose, were omitted. I also took out many of the pairings that feature now-trendy names — think Ella, Emma, and Lucy — because they just don’t sound old-fashioned anymore (though they would have a few decades ago).

The result isn’t exhaustive, but it’s a decent sampling of real-life, old-fashioned double names. I’ve organized them by second name, and I also added links to popularity graphs for names that were in the SSA data during the correct time period (early 1900s).

*

-Ann(e)

Abbyanne, Agnesann, Aliceanne, Bessanne, Bettyann/Bettyanne, Cassanne, Claraanne, Coraanne, Dellaanne, Dollyanne, Dorisann, Dorothyann, Doveanne, Ethelanne, Faeanne, Floyanne, Franceanne, Gayanne, Georgeann/Georgeanne, Gracyanne, Gustyanne, Helenann, Hopeanne, Idaanne, Ivaanne, Jeanann, Jessanne, Joyanne, Judyanne, Katyanne, Lizanne, Lizzyanne, Loisann, Louann/Louanne, Louisaanne, Maeanne, Margaretann, Metaanne, Mollyanne, Nancyann, Nellyanne, Oliveanne, Opalann, Patsyanne, Pattyanne, Phyllisann, Pollyann, Prudyanne, Rayanne, Roseann/Roseanne, Rosyanne, Roxieanne, Royanne, Rueanne, Ruthann/Ruthanne, Shirleyann, Sallyann, Sueanne, Susyanne, Tobyanne, Tommyanne

-Bell(e)

Adabelle, Addiebelle, Altabelle, Anjabell, Annebelle, Anniebell/Anniebelle, Archiebell, Artybelle, Augustabelle, Beckybell, Berthabelle, Bessybell, Bettybell, Beulahbelle, Birdiebelle, Bonniebell, Cassbelle, Clairbelle, Clarabell/Clarabelle, Claybelle, Cleobelle, Conniebell, Corabell/Corabelle, Cordiebell, Corybelle, Danniebell, Dolliebelle, Donnabell/Donnabelle, Dottiebell, Eddybelle, Ednabell, Edrisbell, Effiebelle, Elizabelle, Ellenbelle, Elsiebelle, Essiebell, Esterbelle, Ethelbelle, Ettabelle, Evabelle, Fannybelle, Faybelle, Fernbell, Florabell/Florabelle, Florbell, Flossiebell, Floybell, Frankiebell, Fredybell, Gaybell, Geniebell, Georgiabell, Georgiebelle, Glennabelle, Goldenbell, Gradybelle, Hattybelle, Hazelbell, Hughbell, Idabell/Idabelle, Inezbelle, Indiabelle, Ingabelle, Iscahbell, Ivybelle, Janiebelle, Jaybelle, Jessbell, Jessiebelle, Jewelbell, Jodiebell, Joebell, Johnybell, Jonibell, Jorybelle, Josiebell, Joybell, Junebell, Kaybelle, Kittybelle, Kizzybell, Ladybell, Leahbelle, Leebelle, Lenabelle, Leonabell, Leotabell, Lettybelle, Lizzybelle, Loubelle, Lulabell/Lulabelle, Lulubelle, Lydabell, Lydiabelle, Madgebell, Maebell/Maebelle/Maybell/Maybelle, Maggybell, Mamiebell, Mandybell, Marabelle, Marthabell, Marybell/Marybelle/Maribell/Maribelle, Mattybell, Maudebell, Meadowbelle, Minniebell, Monabell, Myrtlebelle, Nanniebell, Nelliebelle, Nettybell, Nevabelle, Ninabelle, Nitabell, Norabelle, Novabell, Pinkiebell, Pollybelle, Odiebelle, Olabell, Olivebelle, Olliebelle, Orabell/Orabelle, Orphabelle, Queeniebelle, Raybelle, Rebabelle, Rheabelle, Rhodabelle, Ritabelle, Romabelle, Rosabell/Rosabelle, Rosebell/Rosebelle, Rosiebell, Rossbelle, Roybelle, Rudybell, Ruebelle, Sadiebelle, Sallybell, Suebell, Tenniebell, Tessabelle, Tessiebelle, Theabell, Theobelle, Troybell, Trudybell, Verabelle, Verdabell, Vernabelle, Vonniebelle, Wendybell, Wilbabell, Willabell/Willabelle, Willowbell, Willybell, Winniebelle

(…and don’t forget Cowbelle!)

-Bess

Adabess, Anitabess, Annabess, Anniebess, Clarabess, Cristabess, Donnabess, Drewbess, Ellebess, Euniebess, Florabess, Hallibess, Henribess, Hildabess, Idabess, Ilabess, Inabess, Jeanebess, Lanibess, Larabess, Laydebess, Leebess, Lelabess, Lonabess, Lulabess, Lurabess, Maebess, Malabess, Mamebess, Maribess, Marionbess, Marthabess, Maybess, Minabess, Nonabess, Norabess, Orabess, Rosebess, Sarabess, Theobess, Willabess, Zellebess

-Dean

Adadean, Albadean, Almadean, Alphadean, Altadean, Altheadean, Arizadean, Belvadean, Bertadean, Berthadean, Claradean, Claredean, Claydean, Cleatadean, Delladean, Deltadean, Dessadean, Doradean, Ellendean, Elvadean, Ermadean, Ettadean, Evadean, Evedean, Faydean, Floydean, Glendadean, Glendean, Glennadean, Gloriadean, Idadean, Irmadean, Ivadean, Jessadean, Jeweldean, Joydean, Leedean, Leliadean, Loladean, Loradean, Loudean, Luradean, Maedean/Maydean, Maradean, Marthadean, Marvadean, Melbadean, Melvadean, Nedradean, Nelladean, Nettydean, Noladean, Normadean, Olgadean, Oradean, Orbadean, Ouidadean, Rebadean, Rheadean, Rosadean, Rubydean, Ruedean, Suedean, Thelmadean, Velmadean, Vernadean, Veradean, Vivadean, Wandadean, Willadean, Williedean, Willowdean, Wilmadean, Zelmadean

-Dell(e)

Abbiedell, Adadell, Alicedell, Annadell, Anniedell, Archiedell, Barbiedell, Bertdell, Berthadell, Bonniedell, Chloedell, Christadell, Claradelle, Corydell, Deedell, Earthadell, Edithdell, Effiedell, Elizadell, Ermadell, Essiedell, Esterdell, Euradell, Evadell, Evedell, Faydelle, Ferndell, Flodell, Floydell, Frankiedell, Fredadell, Gaydell, Glorydell, Hannahdell, Hattiedell, Hazeldell, Hessiedell, Hopedell, Hughdell, Idadell, Irmadell, Ivadell/Ivadelle, Ivydell, Jessiedell, Jimidell, Joedell, Joydell, Junedell, Katedell, Katydell, Leahdelle, Ledadell, Leedell, Leniedell, Lizdell, Lizziedelle, Loudell, Luludell, Maedell/Maedelle/Maydell/Maydelle, Mamiedelle, Mardgedell, Margiedell, Marthadell, Marydell/Maridell, Minniedell, Moedell, Noradell, Ociedell, Odadell, Oladell, Olgadell, Olivedell, Olliedell, Opaldell, Oradell, Ouidadell, Patriciadell, Raydell, Rosadell, Rubiedell, Ruedell, Ruthdell, Ruthiedell, Suedell, Vaughndell, Vidadell, Walterdelle, Wandadelle, Winniedell, Zoedell

-Donna

Alphadonna, Altadonna, Auradonna, Belledonna, Bonadonna, Claydonna, Cleodonna, Faedonna, Frandonna, Freydonna, Gaydonna, Glendonna, Irisdonna, Joedonna, Leadonna, Leedonna, Loudonna, Maedonna, Maridonna, Mariedonna, Marydonna, Maydonna, Myradonna, Raydonna, Roydonna, Rubydonna, Thoradonna

-Gay(e)

Alliegay, Almagay, Annagay, Anniegay, Ardiegay, Billiegay, Claragay, Ermagay, Floragay, Halliegay, Hildagay, Leilagay, Lunagay, Lydagay, Marygay, Milliegay, Nelliegay, Nevagay, Nidagay, Olagay, Olligay, Ornagay, Ozellagay, Roxygay, Stellagay, Velmagay, Verlagay, Wandagay, Williegay

-Jean

Abbiejean, Albajean, Alicejean, Almajean, Alphajean, Annajean, Beaulahjean, Beckyjean, Belvajean, Berniejean, Berthajean, Bessiejean, Bettyjean, Bobbiejean, Bonniejean, Caroljean, Clydajean, Corajean, Darajean, Daviejean, Donnajean, Eddyjean, Edithjean, Effiejean, Elsajean, Ermajean, Ettajean, Eulahjean, Evajean, Evejean, Fayejean, Florajean, Floyjean, Glennajean, Harlyjean, Hildajean, Idajean, Ivajean, Josiejean, Katejean, Kayjean, Leahjean, Leejean, Lilajean, Loisjean, Lottiejean, Loujean, Lurajean, Maejean, Marahjean, Margyjean, Marthajean, Martiejean, Maryjean/Marijean, Maudejean, Melbajean, Mickeyjean, Missiejean, Mirajean, Molliejean, Myrajean, Neldajean, Nelliejean, Normajean, Novajean, Nylajean, Olgajean, Olivejean, Olliejean, Orajean, Raejean, Rebajean, Rheajean, Ritajean, Romajean, Rosejean, Rubyjean, Ruthjean, Shirleyjean, Suejean, Thedajean, Thelmajean, Unajean, Vedajean, Velmajean, Verajean, Vernajean, Vestajean, Wandajean, Willajean, Willowjean, Wilmajean, Winniejean

-Lee

Almalee, Andylee, Annalee, Annielee, Artylee, Asalee, Avalee, Bertalee, Berthalee, Besslee, Berthalee, Bettylee, Claylee, Coralee, Cordylee, Danylee, Davylee, Dellalee, Dollylee, Doralee, Dorislee, Effylee, Elmalee, Ermalee, Ethellee, Eulalee, Evalee, Fannylee, Fayelee, Floralee, Flossielee, Floylee, Georgialee, Glendalee, Glorialee, Gustalee, Harvylee, Hopelee, Idalee, Ingalee, Irmalee, Ivalee, Ivylee, Jesslee, Joylee, Junelee, Kathylee, Katylee, Maelee, Maralee, Margylee, Marthalee, Marylee, Mattielee, Melbalee, Mildredlee, Minalee, Minnielee, Miriamlee, Myrtlelee, Nancylee, Nolalee, Noralee, Normalee, Omalee, Onalee, Oralee, Orphalee, Ovalee, Patsylee, Pattylee, Percylee, Pollylee, Pruelee, Raelee, Rebalee, Rosalee, Roselee, Roseylee, Rosielee/Rosilee, Roxylee, Roylee, Rubylee, Ruelee, Ruthlee, Sallylee, Thelmalee, Trilbylee, Velmalee, Veralee, Verbalee, Vernalee, Vernelee, Virgielee, Virginialee, Wandalee, Willowlee, Winnylee, Zelmalee

-Lou

Addylou, Albalou, Andylou, Annalou, Annielou, Archielou, Bertalou, Berthalou, Bessielou, Bettelou, Bettylou, Billylou, Birdielou, Bonnielou, Daralou, Dellalou, Dixielou, Doralou, Dulcialou, Eddielou, Ednalou, Effielou, Eliselou, Emmylou, Essielou, Ettalou, Evalou, Evielou, Fannielou, Floralou, Frankielou, Genelou, Gerdylou, Gracielou, Gretalou, Gussielou, Hannalou, Hattielou, Idalou, Iralou, Irmalou, Ivalou, Ivylou, Janelou, Jennalou, Jesselou, Jimmielou, Joelou, Johnnielou, Joylou, Katelou, Lannylou, Leelou, Lindylou, Lizzielou, Lolalou, Maelou, Mamielou, Maralou, Margylou, Marjorielou, Marthalou, Marylou/Marilou, Mattielou, Maxielou, Minnielou, Myralou, Myrtlelou, Nannielou, Nellielou, Nettielou, Nitalou, Noralou, Oralou, Patsylou, Pattilou, Paulalou, Phoebelou, Rebalou, Rhealou, Ritalou, Robertalou, Rosalou, Roselou, Sallylou, Shirleylou, Suelou, Thoralou, Tomielou, Vernalou, Victorinelou, Wanzalou, Willalou, Willilou, Willowlou, Winnielou, Zettalou

-Mae

Addiemae, Alicemae, Algymae, Alicemae, Alphamae, Altamae, Altheamae, Anitamae, Annamae, Anniemae, Artymae, Audymae, Bellemae, Berthamae, Bertiemae, Bessmae, Bessymae, Bettymae, Biddymae, Billiemae, Birdyemae, Carlamae, Chloemae, Clairemae, Claramae, Claymae, Clydamae, Coramae, Cordymae, Corrimae, Davymae, Dellamae, Dinamae, Dolliemae, Donnamae, Doramae, Dorothymae, Eddiemae, Ednamae, Effiemae, Elizamae, Elodymae, Elsiemae, Ermamae, Essiemae, Esthermae, Ethelmae, Ettamae, Eulamae, Evamae, Evemae, Fanniemae, Faymae, Floramae, Flossiemae, Floymae, Fredimae, Friedamae, Genemae, Georgiamae, Gertiemae, Glorymae, Goldymae, Gussymae, Hattiemae, Heddymae, Helenmae, Henrymae, Hollimae, Idamae, Irmamae, Ivymae, Jennymae, Jerrymae, Jessamae, Jessmae, Jessiemae, Joemae, Johnniemae, Jonimae, Joymae, Junemae, Katheemae, Ladymae, Leemae, Lenamae, Leotamae, Lilamae, Lizamae, Lizziemae, Loismae, Lolamae, Lorettamae, Lottiemae, Lulamae, Lulumae, Luramae, Lydiamae, Mandymae, Margymae, Marymae, Mattimae, Melbamae, Mollymae, Myrtlemae, Neldamae, Nelliemae, Nettiemae, Nolamae, Normamae, Olamae, Olgamae, Olivemae, Olliemae, Oramae, Panzymae, Peggymae, Phebemae, Raymae, Rebamae, Rheamae, Rhodamae, Ritamae, Rosamae, Rosemae, Roymae, Rubimae, Ruemae, Ruthiemae, Ruthmae, Shirleymae, Suemae, Sulamae, Susiemae, Sylviamae, Templemae, Theamae, Tommimae, Trilbymae, Trudymae, Veramae, Vermamae, Vernamae, Vestamae, Vidamae, Violamae, Virginiamae, Wandamae, Wilbamae, Willamae, Williemae, Winniemae, Willowmae, Zaidamae, Zellamae

-Nell(e)

Adanell, Albanell, Angienell, Annanelle, Annienell, Archienell, Asanell, Avanell/Avanelle, Bessienell, Berthanell, Bethnell, Birdnell, Claranell, Clarenelle, Claudianell, Cloranell, Deenell, Dessanell, Dovienell, Druenell, Ermanell, Ernienell, Esternell, Eudanell, Evanell/Evanelle, Evenell, Faynell, Floranell, Florencenell, Flonell, Fredanell, Gaynell/Gaynelle, Genenell, Glorianell, Gracenell, Gusternell, Hassienell, Idanell, Ineznell, Ivanell/Ivanelle, Jaenell, Janenell, Jessienell, Jimmienell, Joenell, Johnnienell, Juvianell, Kathienell, Leahnell, Leenell, Lennienell, Liznell, Lounell, Maenell, Maranell, Margienell, Marinelle, Marjorienell, Marthanell, Marynell, Mattienell, Maxinlle, Mayenell, Melbanell, Monanell, Myranell, Nettienell, Noranell, Oranell, Ouidanell, Ovianell, Patsyenell, Raenell, Raynelle, Rebanell, Ritanell, Robbienell, Rosanell, Rosenelle, Rosienell, Rossnell, Roznell, Ruenelle, Ruthnell, Sammienell, Suenell, Thedanell, Tommienell, Tressienell, Verbanell, Verdanell, Verdianell, Vergienell, Wandanell, Wanzanell, Willienell, Willownell, Winnienell, Zoenell

-Rose

Adarose, Albarose, Alicerose, Althearose, Anitarose, Annarose, Ardithrose, Arvarose, Bellerose, Bertharose, Betseyrose, Bettyrose, Billyrose, Cathrose, Clararose, Corarose, Deerose, Delrose, Dollyrose, Dorarose, Dorisrose, Elsarose, Elsierose, Emmyrose, Ermarose, Ethelrose, Ettarose, Eulalirose, Evarose, Everose, Fannyrose, Fayrose, Florarose, Francisrose, Fridarose, Generose, Gladysrose, Glenrose, Glennarose, Goldarose, Hattierose, Hildarose, Huldarose, Idarose, Inezrose, Irmarose, Ivarose, Juneorse, Leerose, Leorose, Louiserose, Lydarose, Maerose/Mayrose, Mardirose, Margirose, Martharose, Maryrose, Melbarose, Melvarose, Minarose, Minnierose, Moerose, Myrnarose, Nellyrose, Nelrose, Neldarose, Nellierose, Nettarose, Nitarose, Oliverose, Ollierose, Patsyrose, Peggyrose, Phillirose, Phoeberose, Rhearose, Ritarose, Robbierose, Rubyrose, Ruthrose, Shirleyrose, Suerose, Thearose, Thelmarose, Tommyrose, Unarose, Velmarose, Verarose, Vernarose, Virdiarose, Wildarose, Willirose, Wylmarose, Zelmarose, Zetarose

-Ruth

Abbyruth, Adaruth, Adeleruth, Aggieruth, Agnesruth, Aliceruth, Almaruth, Alpharuth, Altaruth, Andieruth, Annieruth, Asterruth, Belleruth, Bertaruth, Bessieruth, Bettieruth, Bettyruth, Billieruth, Bonnieruth, Clararuth, Clareruth, Dellaruth, Dollyruth, Donnaruth, Doraruth, Dorisruth, Dorothyruth, Eddieruth, Ednaruth, Effieruth, Eliseruth, Ellenruth, Elvaruth, Estelleruth, Ettaruth, Evaruth, Fayruth, Floraruth, Francesruth, Fridaruth, Georgiaruth, Gladysruth, Gretaruth, Hazelruth, Helenruth, Hildaruth, Idaruth, Irmaruth, Ivaruth, Janeruth, Jeanruth, Jennieruth, Jennyruth, Jesseruth, Jimmiruth, Joeruth, Johnieruth, Joyruth, Judyruth, Juneruth, Katyruth, Kayruth, Ledaruth, Leeruth, Leonaruth, Lilaruth, Loisruth, Louruth, Lucyruth, Mabelruth, Maeruth, Mamieruth, Mararuth, Margieruth, Maryruth, Maxiruth, Mazieruth, Millieruth, Minnieruth, Mollyruth, Monaruth, Myraruth, Nannieruth, Naomiruth, Nellruth, Ninaruth, Nomaruth, Noraruth, Nydaruth, Olgaruth, Omegaruth, Oraruth, Ornaruth, Patsyruth, Pattieruth, Pollyruth, Raeruth, Ritaruth, Roseruth, Rubyruth, Sadieruth, Sueruth, Velmaruth, Veraruth, Verdaruth, Vernaruth, Virginiaruth, Vivianruth, Wandaruth, Wildaruth, Willaruth, Willieruth, Woodieruth

(…and here’s a double name followed by a triple name: Sueruth Ettajoanne Lavell, born in 1927 in California.)

-Sue

Abbysue, Annasue, Annysue, Arnisue, Benniesue, Bertasue, Bessiesue, Bethsue, Bettinasue, Bettisue, Bettysue, Billysue, Birdiesue, Bonniesue, Cathrynsue, Clairsue, Clarasue, Claysue, Clemiesue, Corasue, Danasue, Dellasue, Delsue, Donniesue, Eddysue, Edensue, Eddiesue, Ednasue, Effiesue, Ellysue, Ethelsue, Evasue, Fannysue, Faysue, Fransue, Fredasue, Genesue, Glendasue, Hannasue, Helensue, Hestersue, Homersue, Idasue, Indasue, Irasue, Ivasue, Jennasue, Jensue, Jillisue, Johnsue, Jonisue, Joysue, Karlasue, Katiesue, Kittysue, Linnisue, Lornasue, Lousue, Lydiasue, Marthasue, Marysue, Maysue, Mattisue, Merlesue, Mildredsue, Millisue, Molliesue, Monasue, Myrasue, Nancysue, Nansue, Nellisue, Nevasue, Ninasue, Normsue, Olliesue, Orasue, Orvasue, Patsysue, Pattiesue, Petrasue, Phillipsue, Ramonasue, Rheasue, Rhodasue, Robsue, Rubysue, Valdasue, Verasue, Vernasue, Vinasue, Virginiasue, Vyrlasue, Wandasue, Wendysue, Wildasue, Willasue, Williesue, Winisue, Zadasue

Make Your Own!

I spotted plenty of other combinations that just didn’t happen to be written as single names in the records, so here’s a handy dandy little table to cover some of the other existing combinations…

First Name Second Name
Abbie/Abby, Ada, Addie/Addy, Aggie, Agnes, Alba, Alice, Alma, Alpha, Alta, Andie/Andy, Anna/Annie, Belle, Berta/Bertha, Bessie/Bessy, Betsy, Bettie/Betty, Billie/Billy, Birdie, Bonnie, Clair/Clare, Clara, Clio/Cleo, Cora, Dee, Della, Dolly/Dollie, Dora, Doris, Dorothy, Eddie/Eddy, Edna, Effie, Eliza, Ellen, Elsie, Elva, Estelle, Ethel, Etta, Eula, Eva, Eve, Fae/Fay(e), Fanny/Fannie, Floy, Flora, Frances, Frida/Freda, Freddie, Gene, Georgia, Gladys, Glenda, Glenna, Glory, Golda, Goldie, Greta, Hattie/Hatty, Hazel, Helen, Hilda, Ida, Inez, Irma/Erma, Iva, Jane, Jean, Jennie/Jenny, Jesse/Jessie, Jimmie/Jimmy, Joe, Johnnie, Joy, Judy, June, Kate, Katie/Katy, Kay(e), Kitty/Kittie, Leda, Lee, Lena, Leona, Lila, Liz/Lizzie, Lois, Lola, Lou, Lula, Lydia, Mabel, Mae/May(e), Maisie/Mazie, Mamie, Mara, Margie, Martha, Mattie, Maxie, Melba, Millie, Minnie, Molly/Mollie, Mona, Myra, Myrna, Nannie, Nell(e), Nellie/Nelly, Nettie, Nita, Nola, Nora, Norma, Nyda, Ola, Olga, Olive, Ollie, Omega, Ora, Patsy/Patsie, Patty/Pattie, Polly, Rae/Ray(e), Reba, Rhea, Rhoda, Rita, Rosa, Rose, Rosie, Roxie, Ruth, Sadie, Sally, Shirley, Sue, Theda, Thelma, Tommie/Tommy, Velma, Vera, Verda, Verna, Wanda, Wanza, Wendy, Wilda, Willa, Willie/Willy, Willow, Wilma, Winnie, Zada, Zelma Ann(e)
Bell(e)
Bess
Dean
Dell(e)
Donna
Gay(e)
Jean
Lee
Lou
Mae
Nell(e)
Rose
Ruth
Sue

Which old-fashioned double name do you like best? Would you consider using any of the pairings above for a modern-day baby?

P.S. I’ll follow this up in a few weeks with some old-fashioned double names for boys…

Name Quotes #61: Madeleine, Tim, Clara

It’s the first Monday of the month, so it’s time for some name quotes!

From a Vice interview with Jeff Goldblum:

Vice: Amazing. That’s Charlie Ocean right?

Jeff: Yeah that’s Charlie Ocean! And then our other son [with wife Emilie Livingston, a Canadian aerialist, actress, and former Olympian] who’s now 11 months old is River Joe.

Vice: Any musical streaks in either of them yet?

Jeff: I’ve always sat at the piano these last couple years with Charlie Ocean and he kinda bangs around. But I must say, River Joe, when I play or we put on music, boy he’s just standing up at this point, but he rocks to the music and bounces up and down. He seems to really like it so maybe he’s musical. I’d like to play with them.

(I am fascinated by the fact that the boys aren’t simply Charlie and Joe. Clearly the water aspect of each name requires emphasis every time.)

From the essay Forgetting the Madeleine, written by pastry chef Frances Leech:

In reality, I was named for two grandmothers: Jenny Frances and Lucy Madeleine. However, when I introduce myself at baking classes, I lie.

“My parents named me after the most famous pastry in French literature.”

It is a good name for a pâtissier, a pastry chef, and a good story to tell. The mnemonic sticks in my students’ minds, and after three hours and four cakes made together, they remember me as Madeleine and not Frances. Stories make for powerful anchors, even when the truth is twisted for dramatic effect.

From an article about chef Auguste Escoffier, who named his dishes after the rich and famous:

Escoffier came up with thousands of new recipes, many of which he served at London’s Savoy Hotel and the Paris Ritz. Some were genuine leaps of ingenuity, others a twist on a classic French dish. Many carry someone else’s name. In early dishes, these are often historical greats: Oeufs Rossini, for the composer; Consommé Zola, for the writer; Omelette Agnès Sorel, for the mistress of Charles VII. Later on, however, Escoffier made a habit of giving dishes the handles of people who, in their day, were virtual household names: An entire choir of opera singers’ names are to be found in Escoffier’s cookery books. The most famous examples are likely Melba toast and Peach Melba, for the Australian opera singer Nellie Melba, though there are hundreds of others.

An essay about the plight of people named Tim, by Tim Dowling:

A lot of baggage comes with the name Tim. I have not forgotten Martin Amis’s 20-year-old description of Tim Henman as “the first human being called Tim to achieve anything at all”. More recently Will Self wrote: “There’s little doubt that your life chances will be constrained should your otherwise risk-averse parents have had the temerity to Tim you.” This was in a review of the JD Wetherspoon pub chain, the many faults of which Self put down to founder Tim Martin never being able “to escape the fact of his Timness”.

[…]

Amis and Self believe the poor showing of Tims is the result of nominative determinism: the name Tim carries expectations of inconsequentiality that anyone so christened will eventually come to embody. Gallingly, research suggests they may be right.

From an article about Spanish babies being named after soccer players’ babies:

This was clearly shown when Barcelona star Lionel Messi’s first son Thiago was born to partner Antonella Roccuzzo in November 2012. That year the name Thiago did not appear in the Top 100 boys names given to babies in Spain, according to Spain’s National Statistics Agency [INE].

[…]

Something similar happened when Mateo Messi was born in Sep 2015. In just 12 months Mateo climbed from 14th to 9th most popular name among Spanish parents. Ciro Messi, born in March this year, will surely see the originally Persian name break into the top 100.

From an article about UC Berkeley student (and mom) Natalie Ruiz:

Doe Library’s North Reading Room became Ruiz’s haven. “It was one of the few quiet places where I felt I could focus,” she says. “That season of my life was extremely dark; I didn’t know if I’d make it to graduation, or how I could possibly raise a baby at this time.”

One day at the library, she noticed light shining down on her growing belly, right over the university seal on her T-shirt and the words “fiat lux.” She and Blanchard had considered Lillian or Clara as baby names, but now the choice was made.

“I felt my daughter kick, and it occurred to me that clara in Spanish means ‘bright,’ and I imagined the way that this baby could and would be the bright light at the end of this dark season,” says Ruiz, who gave birth to Clara on May 15, 2014.

From an interview with entrepreneur Eden Blackman:

For many entrepreneurs, starting a business often feels like bringing new life into the world. It’s not every day though, that your endeavours result in a baby named in your honour.

“That’s the pinnacle for me, it’s simply mind-blowing,” says Eden Blackman, founder of online dating business Would Like to Meet and namesake of young Eden, whose parents met on the site several years ago. “That is amazing and quite a lot to take on but it’s a beautiful thing.”

From the article Do You Like Your Name? by Arthur C. Brooks (found via Nameberry):

I cringe a little whenever I hear someone say my name, and have ever since I was a child. One of my earliest memories is of a lady in a department store asking me my name and bursting out laughing when I said, “Arthur.”

Before you judge that lady, let’s acknowledge that it is actually pretty amusing to meet a little kid with an old man’s name. According to the Social Security Administration, “Arthur” maxed out in popularity back in the ’90s. That is, the 1890s. It has fallen like a rock in popularity since then. I was named after my grandfather, and even he complained that his name made him sound old. Currently, “Arthur” doesn’t even crack the top 200 boys’ names. Since 2013, it has been beaten in popularity by “Maximus” (No. 200 last year) and “Maverick” (No. 85).

One thing I constantly hear from people I meet for the first time is, “I imagined you as being much older.” I don’t take this as flattery, because at 54, I’m really not that young. What they are saying is that they imagined someone about 100 years old.

To see more quotes about names, check out the name quotes category.

What Kicked Off the Name “Caresse”?

dinner at antoines, book, 1940s, caresse, baby nameThe unusual baby name Caresse saw its highest usage in the late ’80s and early ’90s (no doubt thanks to commercials for Caress soap, which was launched by Lever in 1985). But it debuted in the U.S. data way back in the 1940s:

  • 1951: unlisted
  • 1950: 5 baby girls named Caresse
  • 1949: 7 baby girls named Caresse [debut]
  • 1948: unlisted
  • 1947: unlisted

Where did it come from?

The 1949 novel Dinner at Antoine’s by Frances Parkinson Keyes, which became one of the bestselling books in the United States that year. The story was also serialized in several newspapers.

It was murder mystery set in New Orleans; the “Antoine’s” of the title refers to the famous Antoine’s Restaurant. One of the characters, Caresse Lalande, was a radio star (her show was called Fashions of Yesteryear). She was also carrying on an affair with her sister’s husband, Léonce. When the sister (named Odile) ended up murdered, both Caresse and Léonce (and many other people in their circle) became suspects.

The name got even more exposure that year thanks to the Literary Guild Book Club, which ran ads that featured not just Dinner at Antoine’s, but Caresse specifically:

caresse in literary guild advertisement

The French word Caresse (and also the English word Cherish) can be traced back to the Latin word carus, meaning “dear, costly, beloved.”

What do you think of the baby names Caresse and Caress? Would you use them?

Sources: Publishers Weekly list of bestselling novels in the United States in the 1940s – Wikipedia, Caress – Online Etymology Dictionary
Image: from the October 1949 issue of Radio Mirror

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: T (part 1)

theda bara, 1915, actress, cinemaHere’s the next installment of rare female names collected from very old films (1910s, 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s).

There were a lot of T-names, so I split the list into two posts. The second half will be up in a few weeks.

Taffy
Taffy was a character name in multiple films, including Penthouse Rhythm (1945) and Springtime in the Sierras (1947).

  • Usage of the baby name Taffy.

Tahama
Tahama was a character played by actress Madame Sul-Te-Wan in the film King of the Zombies (1941).

Tahia
Tahia was a character name in multiple films, including White Savage (1943) and Call of the South Seas (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Tahia.

Tahona
Tahona was a character played by actress Margaret Loomis in the film The Hidden Pearls (1918).

Taisie
Taisie Lockhart was a character played by actress Fay Wray in the film The Conquering Horde (1931).

Takla
Takla was a character played by actress Gilda Gray in the film The Devil Dancer (1927).

Talapa
Talapa was a character played by actress Margaret Loomis in the film Told in the Hills (1919).

Talithy
Talithy Millicuddy was a character played by actress Mary Philbin in the film The Blazing Trail (1921).

Talma
Madame Talma was a character played by actress Edna May Oliver in the film The Great Jasper (1933).

  • Usage of the baby name Talma.

Talu
Talu was a character played by actress Lenore Ulric in the film Frozen Justice (1929).

Taluta
Taluta was a character played by actress Ann Little in the short film The Outcast (1912).

Tama
Tama was a character played by actress Dorothy Lamour in the film Beyond the Blue Horizon (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Tama.

Tamandra
Tamandra was a character played by actress Ormi Hawley in the short film Tamandra, the Gypsy (1913).

Tamarah
Tamarah was a character played by actress Fern Andra in the film Lotus Lady (1930).

Tamarind
Tamarind Brook was a character played by actress Gloria Swanson in the film What a Widow! (1930).

Tambourina
Tambourina was a character played by actress Carrie Clark Ward in the film The Paliser Case (1920).

Tamea
Tamea was a character name in multiple films, including Never the Twain Shall Meet (1925) and Never the Twain Shall Meet (1931).

  • Usage of the baby name Tamea.

Tana
Tana was a character name in multiple films, including The Devil Dancer (1927) and The Forest Rangers (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Tana.

Tanaka
Tanaka was a character played by actress Laska Winter in the film Fashion Madness (1928).

  • Usage of the baby name Tanaka.

Tanis
Tanis was a character name in multiple films, including Babbitt (1924) and Babbitt (1934).

  • Usage of the baby name Tanis.

Tanit
Tanit Zerga was a character played by actress Milada Mladova in the film Siren of Atlantis (1949).

Tannie
Tannie Edison was a character played by actress Virginia Weidler in the film Young Tom Edison (1940).

  • Usage of the baby name Tannie.

Tansy
Tansy Firle was a character played by actress Alma Taylor in the film Tansy (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Tansy.

Tanyusha
Tanyusha was a character played by actress Nancy Carroll in the film Scarlet Dawn (1932).

Tarusa
Tarusa was a character played by actress Esther Dale in the film Aloma of the South Seas (1941).

Tarzana
Tarzana was a character played by actress Raquel Torres in the film So This Is Africa (1933).

Tasia
Tasia was a character played by actress Dolores del Rio in the film The Red Dance (1928).

  • Usage of the baby name Tasia.

Tatiane
Tatiane Shebanoff was a character played by actress Jacqueline Gadsden in the film His Hour (1924).

Tatuka
Tatuka was a character played by actress Velma Whitman in the short film As the Twig Is Bent (1915).

Taula
Taula was a character played by actress Ernestine Gaines in the film Aloma of the South Seas (1926).

Taupou
Taupou was a character played by actress Margaret Livingston in the film The Brute Master (1920).

Taxi Belle
Taxi Belle Hooper was a character played by actress Rita La Roy in the film Blonde Venus (1932).

Tautinei
Tautinei was a character played by actress Grace Lord in the film The Lure of the South Seas (1929).

Teala
Teala Loring was an actress who appeared in films primarily in the 1940s. She was born in Colorado in 1922. Her birth name was Marcia Eloise Griffin.

  • Usage of the baby name Teala.

Teazie
Bessie “Teazie” Williams was a character played by actress Mae Marsh in the film The White Rose (1923).

Tecolote
Tecolote was a character played by actress Dorothy Dalton in the film The Captive God (1916).

Tecza
Tecza was a character played by actress Geraldine Farrar in the film The Woman God Forgot (1917).

Teddy
Teddy Sampson was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in New York in 1895. Teddy was also a character name in multiple films, including Vultures of Society (1916) and Having Wonderful Time (1938).

  • Usage of the baby name Teddy.

Tee-hee-nay
Tee-Hee-Nay was a character played by actress Bessie Eyton in the short film The Legend of the Lost Arrow (1912).

Teena
Teena Johnson was a character played by actress Sally O’Neil in the film Hardboiled (1929).

  • Usage of the baby name Teena.

Teenie
Teenie McPherson was a character played by actress Renee Houston in the film Fine Feathers (1937).

  • Usage of the baby name Teenie.

Tehani
Tehani was a character played by actress Movita in the film Mutiny on the Bounty (1935).

  • Usage of the baby name Tehani.

Tehura
Tehura was a character played by actress Jacqueline Logan in the film Ebb Tide (1922).

Teita
Teita was a character played by actress Bessie Love in the film Soul-Fire (1925).

Tela
Tela Tchaï was an actress who appeared in films in the 1930s and 1940s. She was born in France in 1909.

  • Usage of the baby name Tela.

Teleia
Teleia Van Schreeven was a character played by actress Adele Mara in the film Wake of the Red Witch (1948).

Temata
Temata was a character played by actress Hilo Hattie in the film Tahiti Nights (1944).

Tempe
Tempe Pigott was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1950s. She was born in England in 1884.

  • Usage of the baby name Tempe.

Tempest
Tempest Cody was a character played by actress Marie Walcamp in a series of Tempest Cody short films in 1919.

Temple
Temple Drake was a character played by actress Miriam Hopkins in the film The Story of Temple Drake (1933). The film was based on the novel Sanctuary (1931) by William Faulkner.

  • Usage of the baby name Temple.

Tempy
Aunt Tempy was a character played by actress Hattie McDaniel in the film Song of the South (1946).

  • Usage of the baby name Tempy.

Teodora
Teodora was a character played by actress Alma Rubens in the film The World and His Wife (1920).

Teola
Teola was a character played by various actresses in the various film adaptations of Tess of the Storm Country.

  • Usage of the baby name Teola.

Teresina
Teresina was a character played by actress Nina Campana in the film Tortilla Flat (1942).

Terpsichore
Terpsichore was a character played by actress Rita Hayworth in the film Down to Earth (1947).

Tesha
Tesha was a character played by actress Maria Corda in the film A Woman in the Night (1928).

  • Usage of the baby name Tesha.

Tessibel
Tessibel was a character played by various actresses in the various film adaptations of Tess of the Storm Country.

Tessie
Tessie was a character name in multiple films, including Tessie (1925) and Make Me a Star (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Tessie.

Texas
Texas Guinan was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Texas in 1884. Texas was also a character played by actress Dot Farley in the film Lady Be Good (1928).

  • Usage of the baby name Texas.

Thais
Thais Merton was a character played by actress Adda Gleason in the film One Traveler Returns (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Thais.

Thalie
Thalie was a character played by actress Dagmar Godowsky in the film The Trap (1922).

Thania
Princess Thania was a character played by actress Frances Drake in the film The Lone Wolf in Paris (1938).

  • Usage of the baby name Thania.

Thanya
Thanya was a character played by actress Kitty Gordon in the film The Crucial Test (1916).

  • Usage of the baby name Thanya.

Tharon
Tharon Last was a character played by actress Dorothy Dalton in the film The Crimson Challenge (1922). The film was based on the novel Tharon of Lost Valley (1919) by Vingetta “Vingie” Roe.

  • Usage of the baby name Tharon.

Theda
Theda Bara was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Ohio in 1885. Her birth name was Theodosia Burr Goodman.

  • Usage of the baby name Theda.

Thel
Thel Harris was a character played by actress Lottie Briscoe in the short film Honor Thy Father (1912).

  • Usage of the baby name Thel.

Thelda
Thelda Kenvin was an actress who appeared in one film in 1926. She was born (with the first name Ethelda) in Pennsylvania in 1899. Thelda was also a character played by actress Greta Granstedt in the film There Goes My Heart (1938).

  • Usage of the baby name Thelda.

Thelma
Thelma Todd was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1930s. She was born in Massachusetts in 1906. Thelma Salter was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in California in 1908. Thelma was also a character name in multiple films, including A Modern Thelma (1916) and A Broadway Butterfly (1925).

  • Usage of the baby name Thelma.

Themar
Themar was a character played by actress Barbara La Marr in the film Arabian Love (1922).

Theo
Theo Scofield West was a character played by actress Lana Turner in the film Marriage is a Private Affair (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Theo.

Theodosia
Sister Theodosia was a character played by actress Sarah Padden in the film The Zero Hour (1939).

Thera
Thera Dufre was a character played by actress Gretchen Lederer in the short film Under a Shadow (1915).

  • Usage of the baby name Thera.

Thirza
Thirza Tapper was a character played by actress Viola Lyel in the film The Farmer’s Wife (1941).

  • Usage of the baby name Thirza.

Thomsine
Thomsine Musgrove was a character played by actress Dorothy Mackaill in the film The Fighting Blade (1923).

Thora
Thora was a character name in multiple films, including The Face of the World (1921) and The Winking Idol (1926).

  • Usage of the baby name Thora.

Thorhild
Thorhild was a character played by actress Julia Swayne Gordon in the film The Viking (1928).

Thurya
Thurya was a character played by actress Dorothy Janis in the film Fleetwing (1928).

Thymian
Thymian was a character played by actress Louise Brooks in the film Diary of a Lost Girl (1929).

Thyra
Thyra was a character played by actress Eleanor Boardman in the film The Only Thing (1925).

  • Usage of the baby name Thyra.

*

Which of the above names do you like best?

In the video I pronounced Teala as “tee-AH-lah,” but I now think Teala Loring actually pronounced her name “TEE-lah.” Of course I didn’t find this out until after the video was created. :)

Baby Names Inspired by The Chantels

chantels, music, 1950s, doowop

Though The Chantels were technically the second African-American girl-group (after the Bobbettes) to achieve chart success, they missed being first by just a matter of weeks.

The quintet of Catholic choir girls — Arlene, Lois, Renee, Jackie, and Sonia — hit the scene in the latter half of 1957 with two singles: “He’s Gone,” released in August, and “Maybe,” released in December.

“Maybe” ended up becoming a hit in early 1958, reaching #2 on the R&B charts and #15 on the Hot 100. Here are the Chantels singing (well, lip-syncing) “Maybe” on The Dick Clark Show in March:

The word “Chantels” never ended up in the U.S. baby name data, but non-plural forms like Chantel and Chantell started appearing in 1957:

  • 1964: 45 Chantel, 30 Chantelle, 20 Chantell, 19 Shantel, 12 Shantell, 9 Shantelle, 7 Chantele
  • 1963: 56 Chantel, 31 Chantelle, 11 Shantel, 9 Chantele, 7 Chantell, 6 Shantell
  • 1962: 12 Chantel
  • 1961: 5 Chantel
  • 1960: 5 Chantell
  • 1959: 5 Chantel
  • 1958: 6 Chantell
  • 1957: 5 Chantel
  • 1956: unlisted

I’m not sure what caused that explosion of variants in 1963. The Chantels’ next-biggest hit, “Look In My Eyes” (1961), is too early to account for it. The answer might be the 1962 movie If a Man Answers, which featured a character named Chantal played by Sandra Dee.

So where did the Chantels get their name? From a Catholic parish in Bronx — but not their own, St. Anthony of Padua. Here’s the story:

The girls were performing at a dance at St. Francis [sic] de Chantal parish in Throgs Neck, got a terrific hand from the audience, and had a brainstorm for the name of their group.

They simply altered Chantal — a French place name meaning “stony” — to create Chantel.

Do you like the name Chantel? Do you like it more or less than Chantal?

Sources: