How popular is the baby name Frieda in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Frieda.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Frieda


Posts that Mention the Name Frieda

Name Quotes 76: Haechan, Frieda, Taz

From a Fodor’s article about the German gummy factory Haribo Fabrikverkauf:

At first glance it may seem like the milchbären (milk bears) are simply traditional German gummy bears with a milky jacket slapped on the back. However, not only are the flavors slightly different — including lemon, orange, cherry, strawberry, apple, and raspberry — but these bears have actual names. This fruity, creamy crew includes Emma, Emil, Anton, Mia, Ben, and Frieda.

From a Life article (Jan. 18, 1943) about actor and comedian Zero Mostel:

Back in 1941 Zero was a struggling New York painter who specialized in portraits of strong-muscled workmen. He went by the name of Sam, which was his own (“Zero” is a press agent’s inspiration). […] On Feb. 16, 1942, the day that news of the fall of Singapore reached the U.S., “Zero” Mostel made his professional debut as a night-club funny man.

From the Seattle Times obituary of Hildegarde:

Hildegarde, the “incomparable” cabaret singer whose career spanned almost seven decades and who was credited with starting the single-name vogue among entertainers, has died. She was 99.

From a Tribune India article about cyclone names:

Mala, Helen, Nargis and Nilofer may sound like the names of yesteryear Bollywood actors, but they are, in fact, lethal cyclones that have brought violent winds, heavy rain and wreaked destruction.

As Cyclone Fani pounded the Odisha coast on Friday, the name, which was suggested by Bangladesh, also evoked curiosity.

Mritunjay Mohapatra, the additional director general of the India Meteorological Department (IMD), said Fani, pronounced as ‘Foni’, means a snake’s hood.

From a Teen Vogue interview with Zendaya, who explains how her name is pronounced:

Zendaya decided to break it down for viewers with a simple step-by-step guide: “Zen is the first syllable, then day, and then a.”

“I think a lot of people see my name and think it’s more fancy than it is,” she explained. “They think Zendaya like papaya. It’s just day.

From a WWI-era New York Herald article (May 7, 1918) called “Six Get Permission to Change Names”:

Frederick Michael Knopp, an orchestra leader, disliked his Teutonic sounding name and permission was granted him to change it to Blondell.

Another German name was eliminated by the grave of Justice Guy, who permitted Leon Mendelson, a dental student, to call himself Leon Delson.

Believing that Malcolm Sumner sounded better than Malcolm Sundheimer, the latter applied for and received permission to assume the more euphonious name.

From an AP News article about a baby deer named after a K-pop star:

Fans of the K-pop group NCT 127 donated money in January to name a baby pudu at the Los Angeles Zoo after one of its members, Haechan (HECH’-ehn). This week, the human Haechan got to meet his namesake, snapping selfies with the little deer at his enclosure.

From a BBC article about the danger of female-voiced AI assistants:

AI-powered voice assistants with female voices are perpetuating harmful gender biases, according to a UN study.

These female helpers are portrayed as “obliging and eager to please”, reinforcing the idea that women are “subservient”, it finds.

Particularly worrying, it says, is how they often give “deflecting, lacklustre or apologetic responses” to insults.

From a write-up of Demi Moore‘s 2017 Tonight Show appearance:

“[Demi Lovato is] from Texas and I’m from New Mexico, so our families say our names the same but we each individually pronounce it differently,” Moore said, noting she pronounces it “Deh-mee” while Lovato says “Dem-ee.”

So what are the origins of Moore’s name?

“In my case, my mother just found it on a cosmetic carton,” she told Fallon. “It means ‘half,’ and she didn’t know that, but she just liked it.”

From a Wired article called “Pixar Reinvents Big Hair for Brave“:

So in 2009 Chung’s team designed a new simulator named Taz, after the wild Looney Tunes character. It forms individual coils [of hair] around computer-generated cylinders of varying lengths and diameters. The resulting locks stretch out when Merida runs but snap back into place as soon as she stops.

From the 2013 book Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists 1896–2013 by Trina Robbins:

[A] male pseudonym seemed to be required for action strips, starting with Caroline Sexton who, in 1934, signed “C. M. Sexton” to Luke and Duke. From Cecilia Paddock Munson, who often signed her work either “Pad” or “Paddock Munson,” to Ramona “Pat” Patenaude, to Dale Messick and Tarpe Mills, the women of the 1940s seemed to believe at least in part upon having a male name.

From a Scottish dad who recently named his son Lucifer:

“I looked it up. Our first child born four years ago was going to be called Lucifer but she was a girl so we called her Lucy.

“I wasn’t too sure about Lucifer but eventually said, ‘I want this name’. It would have been even better if he was born on Halloween.”

(I’m actually more concerned about the similarity of the sibset Lucy/Lucifer than about the repercussions of Lucifer itself. Is that weird?)

For more name-related quotes, check out the name quotes category.

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: F

frediOn the hunt for a rare girl name with a retro feel?

Here’s a long list of uncommon female F-names associated with early cinema (1900s-1940s). Each of the names below is either a character name or an actress name from that era. For those names that have seen enough usage to appear in the SSA data, I’ve included links to the popularity graphs.

*

Fabienne
Fabienne was a character name in multiple films, including Fazil (1928) and The Doctor and the Girl (1949).

  • Usage of the baby name Fabienne (which debuted in the data in 1949).

Fadette
Fadette was a character name in multiple films, including Fanchon, the Cricket (1915) and The Inner Chamber (1915).

Faire
Faire Binney was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1950s. She was born in New Jersey in 1900. Her birth name was Frederica Gertrude Binney. Faire was also a character played by actress Frances Dade in the film The She-Wolf (1931).

Falfi
Falfi Tumble was a character played by actress Marjorie Daw in the film Fear-Bound (1925).

Faline
Faline was an animated character in the film Bambi (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Faline (which debuted in the data in 1943).

Fanchette
Fanchette was a character name in multiple films, including A Million a Minute (1916) and The Daring of Diana (1916).

Fanchon
Fanchon was a character name in multiple films, including Fanchon, the Cricket (1915) and The Clown (1927).

Fancy
Fancy was a character name in multiple films, including The Heart Line (1921) and The Fighting O’Flynn (1949).

  • Usage of the baby name Fancy.

Fanette
Fanette was a character name in multiple films, including Money Mad (1918) and A Gamble with Hearts (1923).

Fania
Fania Marinoff was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in Russia (now Ukraine) in 1890. Fania was also a character name in multiple films, including When a Girl Loves (1924) and The Yellow Ticket (1931).

  • Usage of the baby name Fania.

Fanina
Fanina was a character played by actress Carmen Phillips in the film The Man Who Turned White (1919).

Fannia
Fannia was a character played by actress Ann Rork in the film The Blonde Saint (1926).

Fantasca
Fantasca was a character played by actress Alice Joyce in the short film Fantasca, the Gipsy (1912).

Fanutza
Fanutza was a character played by actress Margaret Loomis in the film Law of the Lawless (1923).

Farina
Farina was a character played by actress Gloria Swanson in the film The Fable of Elvira and Farina and the Meal Ticket (1915).

  • Usage of the baby name Farina.

Faun
Faun was a character played by actress Inez Courtney in the film Big City Blues (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Faun.

Fauvette
Fauvette was a character played by actress Elsie Ferguson in the film His Parisian Wife (1919).

Fay
Fay Tincher was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Kansas in 1884. Fay Bainter was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1960s. She was born in California in 1893. Fay Wray (of King Kong fame) was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1950s. She was born in Canada in 1907. Her birth name was Vina Fay Wray. Fay was also a character name in multiple films, including The Rainbow Trail (1925) and Stage Kisses (1927).

  • Usage of the baby name Fay.

Fayaway
Fayaway was a character played by actress Raquel Torres in the film White Shadows in the South Seas (1928).

Fedora
Fedora was a character name in multiple films, including Fedora (1918) and The Woman from Moscow (1928).

  • Usage of the baby name Fedora.

Felicitas
Felicitas was a character played by actress Greta Garbo in the film Flesh and the Devil (1926).

Femie
Femie was a character played by actress Neva Gerber in the short film Billie, the Hillbilly (1915).

Fenella
Fenella was a character name in multiple films, including A Man of His Word (1915) and Name the Man (1924).

Ferike
Ferike Boros was an actress who appeared in films in from the 1910s to the 1940s. She was born in Austria-Hungary (now Romania) in 1880.

Fernande
Fernande was a character played by actress Bodil Rosing in the film Roberta (1935).

Fernie
Fernie Schmidt was a character played by actress Colleen Moore in the film It Must Be Love (1926).

  • Usage of the baby name Fernie.

Fernway
Fernway de la Fer was a character played by actress Lena Horne in the film Broadway Rhythm (1944).

Fiammetta
Fiammetta was a character played by actress Marion Leonard in the short film An Awful Moment (1908).

Fidelia
Fidelia was a character played by actress Armida in the film General Crack (1930).

Fieda
Fieda Druse was a character played by actress Ann Little in the film The World for Sale (1918).

Fifi
Fifi D’Orsay was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1960s. She was born in Canada in 1904. Her birth name was Marie-Rose Angelina Yvonne Lussier. Fifi was also a character name in multiple films, including The Blackbird (1926) and While Paris Sleeps (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Fifi.

Filina
Filina was a character played by various actresses (such as Blanche Cornwall and Clara Beyers) in various movies called Mignon, all based on the 1866 opera of the same name.

Filomena
Filomena was a character played by actress Rafaela Ottiano in the film All Men Are Enemies (1934).

Fiora
Fiora Bixby was a character played by actress Barbara Brown in the film Arthur Takes Over (1948).

  • Usage of the baby name Fiora.

Fioretta
Fioretta was a character name in multiple films, including The Conspiracy of the Crazy (1941) and Song of Scheherazade (1947).

Flametta
Flametta was a character played by actress Marion Leonard in the short film The Duke’s Plan (1910).

Flavia
Flavia Arcaro was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Texas in 1876. Flavia was also a character name in multiple films, including Ponjola (1923) and The Prisoner of Zenda (1937).

  • Usage of the baby name Flavia.

Fleur
Fleur Forsyte was a character played by actress Barbara La Marr in the film The White Monkey (1925).

  • Usage of the baby name Fleur.

Fleurette
Fleurette was a character name in multiple films, including Heart’s Desire (1917) and It Happened in New York (1935).

Fleurie
Fleurie was a character played by actress Christiane Yves in the film They Had to See Paris (1929).

Fleurique
Fleurique was a character played by actress Thelma Leeds in the film The Toast of New York (1937).

Flo
Flo was a character name in multiple films, including The Labyrinth (1915) and G. I. Honeymoon (1945).

  • Usage of the baby name Flo.

Florabel
Florabel Thurston was a character played by actress Florence Baker in the short film The Course of True Love (1910).

Florabelle
Florabelle was a character name in multiple films, including The Case of the Curious Bride (1935) and Wives Never Know (1936).

Florella
Florella was a character played by actress Nina Mae McKinney in the film Dark Waters (1944).

Florelle
Florelle was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1950s. She was born in France in 1898. Her birth name was Odette Elisa Joséphine Marguerite Rousseau.

Florentine
Florentine Fair was a character played by actress Cleo Madison in the film The Lure of Youth (1921).

Floretta
Floretta was a character played by actress Ruth Clifford in the short film The Keeper of the Gate (1917).

Florette
Florette was a character name in multiple films, including Indiscreet Corinne (1917) and Lilies of the Field (1924).

Floria
Floria was a character name in multiple films, including The Barbarian (1921) and Breezing Home (1937).

  • Usage of the baby name Floria.

Florianne
Florianne was a character played by various actresses (such as Mary Thurman and Genevieve Tobin) in various movies called Zaza, all based on the 1898 play of the same name.

Florida
Florida Kingsley was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Florida in 1867. Florida was also a character played by actress Maude George in the film The Frame-Up (1915).

Florie
Florie Watson was a character played by actress Ona Munson in the film The Cheaters (1945).

  • Usage of the baby name Florie.

Florine
Florine Hanna was an actress who appeared in 1 film in 1916. She was born in Kentucky in 1883. Florine was also a character name in multiple films, including The Rose of Paris (1924) and Broadway Babies (1929).

Florrie
Florrie was a character name in multiple films, including Bells of San Juan (1922) and Murder by an Aristocrat (1936).

Floss
Floss was a character played by actress Madge Kennedy in the film The Blooming Angel (1920).

  • Usage of the baby name Floss.

Flossie
Flossie was a character name in multiple films, including A Deal in Diamonds (short, 1915) and Little Miss Broadway (1938).

Flossy
Flossy was a character played by actress Gwen Lee in the film Sharp Shooters (1928).

  • Usage of the baby name Flossy.

Flotilda
Flotilda was a character played by actress Nina Mae McKinney in the film The Power of the Whistler (1945).

Flotilla
Flotilla was a character played by actress Florence Turner in the short film Flotilla the Flirt (1914).

Fola
Fola Dale was a character played by actress Lila Lee in the film A Bit of Heaven (1928).

  • Usage of the baby name Fola.

Follette
Follette Marsh was a character played by actress Mary Astor in the film The Lost Squadron (1932).

Fortuna
Fortuna was a character name in multiple films, including The Carpet from Bagdad (1915) and Castles in the Air (1919).

  • Usage of the baby name Fortuna (which debuted in the data in 1915).

Foxey
Foxey Dennison was a character played by actress Joyce Compton in the film Affairs of a Gentleman (1934).

Francelia
Francelia Billington was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Texas in 1895.

Francey
Francey was a character name in multiple films, including Dead End (1937) and Vivacious Lady (1938).

Franchette
Franchette was a character played by actress Helen Dunbar in the short film Mrs. Trenwith Comes Home (1914).

Francie
Francie Callahan was a character played by actress Arline Judge in the film Harvard, Here I Come! (1941).

Francine
Francine was a character name in multiple films, including Francine (short, 1914) and High Pressure (1932).

Franzi
Franzi was a character played by actress Claudette Colbert in the film The Smiling Lieutenant (1931).

Freda
Freda was a character name in multiple films, including Many Waters (1931) and Hard Steel (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Freda.

Freddie
Winifred “Freddie” Jones was a character played by actress Betty Grable in the film The Beautiful Blonde from Bashful Bend (1949).

Frederica
Frederica was a character played by actress Irene Rich in the film Beau Brummel (1924).

Frederika
Frederika was a character name in multiple films, including Confessions of a Queen (1925) and White Hunter (1936).

Fredi
Fredi Washington was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1930s. She was born in Georgia in 1903. Her birth name was Fredericka Carolyn Washington.

  • Usage of the baby name Fredi.

Frieda
Frieda Inescort was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1960s. She was born in Scotland in 1901. Frieda was also a character played by actress Evelyn Brent in the film Spy Train (1943).

  • Usage of the baby name Frieda.

Fritzi
Fritzi Massary was an actress who appeared in films from the 1900s to the 1920s. She was born in Austria-Hungary (now Austria) in 1882. Her birth name was Friederike Massaryk. Fritzi Brunette was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1940s. She was born in Georgia in 1890. Her birth name was Florence Brunet. Fritzi Ridgeway was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Montana in 1898. Fritzi was also a character name in multiple films, including Broadway Arizona (1917) and One Heavenly Night (1931).

  • Usage of the baby name Fritzi.

Fulvia
Princess Fulvia was a character played by actress Vola Vale in the film Zollenstein (1917).

Furja
Furja was a character played by actress Blanche Friderici in the film Fleetwing (1928).

…Which of the above F-names do you like best?

Source: IMDb

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: H

Hulda, one of many rare female H-names names from early cinemaHere’s the next installment of rare female names — either actress names or character names — from very old movies (released from the 1910s to the 1940s).

Hagar
Hagar was a character name in multiple films, including Vampire of the Desert (short, 1913) and Code of the Wilderness (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Hagar.

Haidee
Haidee Wright was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in England in 1867. Her birth name was Ada Wright. Haidee was also a character name in multiple films, including In the Sultan’s Garden (short, 1911) and Monte Cristo (1922).

  • Usage of the baby name Haidee.

Hammanda
Hammanda was a character played by actress Gale Henry in the short film Soup and Nuts (1916).

Hanifi
Hanifi was a character played by actress Alice Hollister in the short film An Arabian Tragedy (1912).

Hannerl
Hannerl was a character played by actress Mary Philbin in the film Love Me and the World Is Mine (1927).

Hanni
Hanni was a character played by actress Astrid Holm in the Danish film Lavinen (1920).

  • Usage of the baby name Hanni.

Hanoum
Hanoum was a character played by actress Adda Gleason in the film Saved from the Harem (1915).

Hansi
Hansi Niese was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Austria-Hungary (now Austria) in 1875.

Haoli
Haoli Young was a character played by actress Gene Tierney in the film China Girl (1942).

Harriett
Harriett Bryant was a character played by actress Virginia Weidler in the film This Time for Keeps (1942).

Hassouna
Hassouna was a character played by actress Alla Nazimova in the film Eye for Eye (1918).

Hatatcha
Princess Hatatcha was a character played by actress Mai Wells in the film The Last Egyptian (1914).

Haydee
Haydee was a character played by actress Eleanor Phelps in the film The Count of Monte Cristo (1934).

  • Usage of the baby name Haydee.

Hebe
Hebe was a character name in multiple films, including Beating the Odds (1919) and Fancy Dress (1919).

  • Usage of the baby name Hebe.

Hedda
Hedda Hopper was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1960s. She was born in Pennsylvania in 1885. Her birth name was Elda Furry. Hedda Nova was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Russia in 1899. Hedda was also a character name in multiple films, including A Self-Made Lady (short, 1918) and Servants’ Entrance (1934).

  • Usage of the baby name Hedda.

Hedy
Hedy Lamarr was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1950s. She was born in Austria-Hungary (now Austria) in 1914. Her birth name was Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler. Hedy was also a character played by actress Ruth Hussey in the film Bedside Manner (1945).

  • Usage of the baby name Hedy.

Hela
Hela Marcale was a character played by actress Marin Sais in the short film The Sheriff of Hope Eternal (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Hela.

Helaine
Helaine Frank was a character played by actress Leonora Corbett in the film Anything to Declare? (1938).

Helda
Helda McCabe was a character played by actress Arline Pretty in the film Stormswept (1923).

Helenita
Helenita was a character played by actress Conchita Montenegro in the film Parisian Life (1936).

Helga
Helga was a character name in multiple films, including The Virtuoso (short, 1914) and The Viking (1928).

  • Usage of the baby name Helga.

Henny
Henny Porten was an actress who appeared in films from the 1900s to the 1950s. She was born in Germany in 1890. Her birth name was Frieda Ulricke Porten.

  • Usage of the baby name Henny.

Henriette
Henriette was a character name in multiple films, including The Caillaux Case (1918) and Orphans of the Storm (1921).

Hepsabiah
Hepsabiah Hardlot was a character played by actress Zasu Pitts in the short film He Had ’em Buffaloed (1917).

Hepzibah
Hepzibah Pyncheon was a character played by various actresses (such as Mary Fuller and Margaret Lindsay) in various movies called The House of the Seven Gables, all based on the novel of the same name by Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Hermia
Hermia was a character name in multiple films, including A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1909) and Wood Love (1925).

  • Usage of the baby name Hermia.

Heroica
Heroica was a character played by actress Claudia Coleman in the film The Warrior’s Husband (1933).

Hertha
Hertha was a character played by actress Barbara Kent in the film Flesh and the Devil (1926).

  • Usage of the baby name Hertha.

Hester
Hester was a character name in multiple films, including Single Life (1921) and A Bill of Divorcement (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Hester.

Hettie
Hettie was a character played by actress Thelma Todd in the film Nevada (1927).

  • Usage of the baby name Hettie.

Hetty
Hetty was a character name in multiple films, including The Open Gate (short, 1909) and Three O’Clock in the Morning (1923).

  • Usage of the baby name Hetty.

Hezzie
Hezzie Jones was a character played by actress Hilda Vaughn in the film The Wedding Night (1935).

  • Usage of the baby name Hezzie.

Hilda
Hilda Vaughn was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1940s. She was born in Maryland in 1898. Hilda was also a character name in multiple films, including A Girl of the People (short, 1914) and The Top of New York (1922).

  • Usage of the baby name Hilda.

Hildegarde
Hildegarde Withers was a character name in multiple films, including Murder on a Honeymoon (1935) and Forty Naughty Girls (1937).

Hildy
Hildegard “Hildy” Johnson was a character played by actress Rosalind Russell in the film His Girl Friday (1940).

  • Usage of the baby name Hildy.

Hina
Hina was a character name in multiple films, including Aloma of the South Seas (1926) and Hawaii Calls (1938).

  • Usage of the baby name Hina.

Hippolyta
Hippolyta was a character name in multiple films, including The Warrior’s Husband (1933) and A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1935).

Hisham
Hisham was a character played by actress Julia Faye in the film Samson and Delilah (1949).

  • Usage of the baby name Hisham.

Hitia
Hitia was a character played by actress Mamo Clark in the film The Hurricane (1937).

Hitty
Hitty was a character name in multiple films, including The Veiled Woman (1922) and Sentimental Journey (1946).

Honey
Honey McNeil was a character played by actress Josephine Dunn in the film Love’s Greatest Mistake (1927).

  • Usage of the baby name Honey.

Honore
Princess Honore was a character played by actress Alice Brady in the film The Gilded Cage (1916).

  • Usage of the baby name Honore.

Honoria
Honoria was a character name in multiple films, including Runaway June (1915) and A Bit of Heaven (1928).

Honorine
Honorine was a character played by actress Jessie Ralph in the film Port of Seven Seas (1938).

Hopama
Hopama was a character played by actress Ethel Clayton in the film A Soul Without Windows (1918).

Hoppy
Hoppy Grant was a character played by actress Ilka Chase in the film No Time for Love (1943).

Hortense
Hortense was a character name in multiple films, including The Uplifters (1919) and Roar of the Dragon (1932).

Hortensia
Hortensia deVereta was a character played by actress Aileen Pringle in the film My American Wife (1922).

Huguette
Huguette was a character name in multiple films, including The Vagabond King (1930) and If I Were King (1938).

Hulda
Hulda was a character name in multiple films, including Hulda from Holland (1916) and Twelve Miles Out (1927).

  • Usage of the baby name Hulda.

Huldah
Huldah was a character played by actress Kathlyn Williams in the film The Wanderer (1925).

  • Usage of the baby name Huldah.

Hutin
Hutin Britton was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in England in 1876. Her birth name was Nelly Hutin Britton.

Hyacinth
Hyacinth was a character name in multiple films, including The Headleys at Home (1938) and Dead Reckoning (1947).

Hyla
Hyla Wetherill was a character played by actress Lucille Ricksen in the film The Galloping Fish (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Hyla.

Hylda
Hylda Hollis was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in Pennsylvania in 1891.

  • Usage of the baby name Hylda.

Hyllary
Hyllary Jones was a character played by actress Mary Astor in the film Thousands Cheer (1943).

*

Which of the above H-names do you like best?

Source: IMDb

Addressing Elderly Individuals by Their First Names

I usually talk about how to choose first names, but deciding when to use those first names is another important topic. Paula Span, a contributor to the New York Times blog The New Old Age, published a post today about health care professionals who address elderly patients by their first names. Here’s an excerpt:

Nurses, technicians, therapists: Everyone seems to find it perfectly appropriate — friendly, even — to refer to people in their 70s and 80s not as Miss, Mrs. or Mr., but as Sally, Frieda or Carl.

What’s wrong with that? As a hospital patient, “you’re suddenly in this strange environment in which you have no control,” [nurse Kris DeWeese] explained. “You’re practically naked, and people are coming in and out of your room, asking personal questions and examining you. And you already feel sick and worried.”

“To be addressed with extra respect, even if someone is asking you about your bowel movements, gives some recognition that you’re still the able, competent person you were before you came into the hospital,” Ms. DeWeese said.

The comments are very interesting as well. Definitely think about forwarding the post to anyone you know who works with the elderly (in any capacity).

Name Your Munchkin after a Munchkin?

If you’re a huge Oz fan — or just a fan of old-fashioned names generally — here’s a list of (most of) the people who played Munchkins in the legendary 1939 movie “The Wizard of Oz”:

Male Female
Adam
Albert
Arnold
August
Bela
Bernard
Billy (2)
Carl (2)
Carlos
Charles (4)
Charley
Clarence
Colonel
Dominick
Eddie
Elmer
Emil
Eugene
Eulie
Frank (3)
Franklin
Franz
Fredreich
Garland
George (2)
Gerard
Gus
Harry
Harvey
Henry
Howard
Jack
Jakob (2)
James (2)
Jimmie
Jessie
John (2)
Johnny (3)
Joseph (2)
Karl
Kurt
Lajos
Leon
Lewis
Matjus
Matthew
Meinhardt
Mickey
Murray
Nels
Nicholas
Parnell
Prince
Robert
Sandor
Theodore
Tommy
Victor
Walter
Willi
William (2)
Addie
Alta
Ann
Betty (2)
Carolyn
Charlotte
Christie
Dolly
Donna
Elizabeth
Elly
Elsie
Emma
Ethel
Eva
Fern
Freda
Frieda
Gertrude
Gladys (2)
Gracie
Hazel (2)
Helen (2)
Hilda (2)
Hildred
Jeane
Joan
Josefine
Leona
Lida
Lillian
Margaret (3)
Marguerite
Marie
Mitzi
Nita
Nona
Olga
Patsy
Priscilla
Ruth (2)
Shirley
Stella
Thaisa
Valerie
Viola
Yvonne

While the majority of the 132 Munchkins in the film were played by little people, a handful of the female Munchkins were actually played by child actresses.

Source: The Wizardry of Oz by Jay Scarfone and William Stillman, via Kansas Wizard of Oz ‘N More.